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What If I Leave My Airline After 11 Years?  
User currently offlineWobbles From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 149 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3828 times:

Can anyone with HR/Hiring knowledge give some advice on what I may do (quit) or what may happen to me (firing)? I am vested with the airline I am with but I am really sick of their harrasment and brutal treatment. I am not saying I have not done anything wrong but have received absurd punishment for things that did not fit the crime and most of the "checkered past" is over 7 years old, but how some people just don' t want to let go.
If I got a new job, particulary with another carrier, how could I explain leaving the old carrier (or current) and downplay the certain supisicions that a manager would have. People don't leave airlines (generally speaking) after 11 years, particulary with a topped out wage like I have. Especially if god forbid, I got fired, proably for a trumped up charge. What could I say during an interview? I know I could just say laid off or quit, but with my seniority it seems it would be hard to remove all doubts that something trobulesome did not fit into my leaving, if I did leave......Thanks in advance...

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBrokenrecord From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 772 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3814 times:

Perhaps that you were looking for more carreer fulfillment? A new adventure perhaps?

User currently offlineJtamu97 From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 658 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3788 times:

Be honest, sounds like what you wrote here would be enough to suffice during an interview. Here in Texas, we can only ask former employers woould you re-hire this person again. Even if that person gives detail, you cannot legally use that to sway your decision. Nothing wrong with getting tired with the BS of any company whether it be an airline, law firm, etc. On another note, if you feel you have truly been harrased and or discriminated for something that happened in the past, I would write a nice letter the the HR department of the airline. I do not know what your did nor do I care, but if you truly feel the glove does not fit, you must aquit and find a new job!

Later,
J



Propeller, we don't need no stinkin propeller
User currently offlineBobnwa From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 6477 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3711 times:

Quoting Wobbles (Thread starter):
most of the "checkered past" is over 7 years old,

How much of the checkered past is recent and what were the incidents?


User currently offlineNWOrientDC10 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1404 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3678 times:
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One option you have is to send out resumes. If you can afford it, have your resume done by a pro and explain your situation. Maybe this person can give some good advice.

I am sorry about your treatment by "higher-ups". I've experienced harassment myself, not only by higher ranking employees but by co-workers of equal standing. If things are that bad maybe it's only a matter of time before you get fired on some trumped up charge.

One thing you do have in your favor is continuous employment with the same company for eleven years. A lot of perspective employers are reluctant to hire those who go from job to job. Continuous employment is a sign of loyalty and maybe willingness to put up with a lot of bs.

Use the eleven years of being with one company to your advantage in an interview. Also, make a list of co-workers, supervisors, and managers with whom you are on good terms. They may give you a good reference (and even a letter of recommendation).

It's not unusual for senior employees to find work elsewhere for various reasons (more money, relocation, do something different, ...). CEO's do it, so can you.

Keep in mind that if you do find other employment, you may have to start at the bottom of the ladder. However, starting over may be better than staying in your current situation.

I hope this helps and good luck  Smile

Good day, Russell



Things aren't always as they seem
User currently offlineLono From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 1335 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3639 times:

I recommend you leave... I did after 14 years.... never looked back and made twice as much money the first year I left.... Do not be afraid.... go man go.... trust in yourself... the airlines don't pay enough for you to put up with their crapola....


Wally Bird Ruled the Skys!
User currently offlineFrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3766 posts, RR: 11
Reply 6, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3625 times:

What if you quit after 11 years? Well, too bad for them, for starters!

If you feel harrassed, or simply if going to work everyday is an unbearable pain in the back, it is reason enough to quit (while you're ahead...), and I think any HR person could understand that. But as said above, I think you need to try and stay in good relations with your previous employer so it doesn't affect your future job searching.

Maybe a nice, calm, courteous, straight forward talk with your superior, to ask him what he thinks of you and why is it you think you are not appreciated in the airline. He will probably be honest with you, if not you'll probably be able to 'read between the lines'... From there you can say you fear for your present job, and that in the event that you were let go, you'd like to find a way that it wouldn't affect any posterior job search.

Play the honest card. And I think a direct conversation is better than a letter.

Of course, I've never worked more than 4 years with the same employer, so I don't know how I would feel in your place. But maybe it helps.



Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
User currently offlineWobbles From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 149 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 3565 times:

Responding to Bob at NWA, I will not get into every incident or share one that I feel uncomfortable talking about, however this may give you some idea. I really let a manager have it for extending a qualification period that I was on without any warning, in fact, he told one of my supervisors I would pass 2 weeks earlier. The next day or two, he asked a stand in supervisor to write evaluations on all the agents on probation/qualification, including me (he asked for all the agents so it would not look so obvious). I got all ones or twos, the worst ratings, from this, again, stand in supervisor. I learned later on that they were friends who lived together (he was a gay man, she a 26 year supv, so they were just friends, but still). I wound up passing 5 weeks later, but not before that left a black mark. That happened 9 years ago, but that is just one example of how I have been treated.

User currently offlineWobbles From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 149 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3403 times:

Just wanted to try to keep the thread going folks, so that is why I moved it to the front again, any other feedback is welcome. If there is not anymore, thanks to all who did respond.

User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3363 times:

Get out of the airline industry, period. Seriously. Look at it now vs. 11 years ago, and hopefully you'll realize that it's not worth it anymore. A prospective employer would most likely understand why someone would want to find a more secure industry.

Look at some growing professions that are in hot demand today, and find a way to train yourself for one of those that you might find interesting. Looking at your profile, I don't know if you're closer to 36 or 45, so that might play a role, too.


User currently offlineSlashd0t From Canada, joined Dec 2002, 221 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3335 times:

It's very simple to change roles/jobs without looking suspicious. Tell them you feel you met your maximum growth there and are searching more new and fresh opportunities and a place to expand your growth potential. Being at one place for 11 years is quite an accomplishment. It's always good to have a fresh change.


/.
User currently offlineAA7573E From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 475 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3322 times:

Perhaps you should focus on doing your job and not getting bad reviews, and assume that the rest will take care of itself wether you stay at your current job, or seek new employment.


See you up front!
User currently offlineFlyGuyClt From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 537 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3307 times:

Do a great interview. Focus on your future and career objectives.

Remember. A previous employer may only legally give the dates for which you were employed. They may not discuss your work record in detail or file.

Safe Flying  Smile



Florida Express, Braniff II and ......
User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3280 times:

Quoting FlyGuyClt (Reply 12):
Remember. A previous employer may only legally give the dates for which you were employed. They may not discuss your work record in detail or file.

When I left a company a few years ago, the only way they could say anything beyond the basics was if I signed a release. I didn't.


User currently offlineType-Rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3200 times:

Usually it's:

Date of Hire?
Date of Departure?
Eligible for rehire? or "retired on "date".

At our company the referrals are handled by telephone. Your prospective employer calls an 800 number and is told to enter the Soc Sec number of the employee in question and a recording plays the information outlined above. So you can be guaranteed that nothing outside the legal limits is stated.

Another thing you can do is look for employment in another area of your airline.
Sometimes a transfer to a different department can do wonders for your career.


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