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Airbus/Boeing Plane Ads In Magazines: Why?  
User currently offlineSNATH From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3243 posts, RR: 22
Posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 5881 times:

Hi all,

I have a (probably daft) question.

I have noticed that both Airbus and Boeing run ads about their latest plane types in magazines. For example, Boeing has been running a two-page ad on the B787 in Flight International for some time now. Airbus also recently started a multi-page ad on the A350 in FI too.

My question is: who are these ads targeted to? I really can't see an airline / leasing company executive flicking through FI and saying: "Oh cool, the A350 looks really great", calling up Leahy, and then ordering 50 of them. Also, I can't see them being targeted to passangers, as they emphasize the efficiency / low operating costs of the planes, instead their passanger-pleasing features.

So, the question is: what's the point of such ads?

Tony


Nikon: we don't want more pixels, we want better pixels.
22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEZEIZA From Argentina, joined Aug 2004, 4967 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 5866 times:

Maybe it is intended to create another A vs B battle on A.net Big grin


Carp aunque ganes o pierdas ...
User currently offlineFlyingNanook From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 830 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 5817 times:

The ads are targeted to the passengers. They see how great and shiny and new these planes are and they want to fly on airlines that use these planes. Airlines then have the pressure to fly the shiny new planes that passengers want because they saw them in a magazine.

At least that's how I heard it explained somewhere.



Semper ubi sub ubi.
User currently offlineSWISSER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 5807 times:

Quoting FlyingNanook (Reply 2):
The ads are targeted to the passengers. They see how great and shiny and new these planes are and they want to fly on airlines that use these planes. Airlines then have the pressure to fly the shiny new planes that passengers want because they saw them in a magazine.

At least that's how I heard it explained somewhere.

That is perfectly explained!
remember the Airbus video ad's about there no middle seats etc.
I think they are still downloadable at A.com


User currently offlineCentrair From Japan, joined Jan 2005, 3598 posts, RR: 20
Reply 4, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 5791 times:

Its just like seeing an Airbus commercial on TV. I think they are great Commercials but...I know I can't afford them.

Sometimes on BBC World, you can see an Airbus commercial followed by a commercial for an airline that operates them. I recently saw one where they advertised the A330 and then there was a commercial for Qatar Airways.

I have to say Airbus commercials are just fun to watch. Love the one about the A340-500 with the two Chinese guys waiting on a tarmac for planes to land. When they don't show up, they decided to play table tennis on the baggage cart.

My wife has seen these commercials and thought, "Why?" But when we flew on a Garuda A330 to Bali, she mentioned the commercial to me. She is not a plane fan...what...so...ever. I guess they get the general public thinking about the experience.

Wish Boeing did some TV spots. Would love to see them. Might be fun.



Yes...I am not a KIX fan. Let's Japanese Aviation!
User currently offlineZone1 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 1035 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 5718 times:

Quoting Centrair (Reply 4):

Wish Boeing did some TV spots. Would love to see them. Might be fun.

They do, and you can! http://www.boeing.com/companyoffices/aboutus/advertising/



/// U N I T E D
User currently offlineAfterburner From Indonesia, joined Jun 2005, 1211 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 5693 times:

They create "brand awareness".

In Indonesia (and many other countries in the world, I'm sure), Boeing, for lots of people, is the best aircraft manufacturer they know (and maybe it's the ONLY one they know). So when the government allowed private airlines to use jet aircrafts (only the state-owned Garuda was allowed to have ones before), they bought/leased mostly Boeing 737-200. In the fuselages, they put the words "BOEING 737" quite boldly. And Lion Air, whose fleet consists mostly of MD82s, names them "BOEING MD82". And in the newspapers' ads, they (the airlines) always write "We use large aircraft, Boeing 737" (sure they're larger than the turboprops they had used before ).

[Edited 2005-08-12 04:00:44]

User currently offlineSNATH From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3243 posts, RR: 22
Reply 7, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 5506 times:

Thanks all for the replies!

Quoting FlyingNanook (Reply 2):
The ads are targeted to the passengers. They see how great and shiny and new these planes are and they want to fly on airlines that use these planes. Airlines then have the pressure to fly the shiny new planes that passengers want because they saw them in a magazine.

This is what I was thinking too. But, given that most passangers have no clue what plane they are flying on, I can't see how it helps. Also, apart from a.nutters, most people make their reservations without any idea on what type of plane it will be.

So, I personally remain sceptical on the effectiveness of these ads.

Tony



Nikon: we don't want more pixels, we want better pixels.
User currently offlineStirling From Italy, joined Jun 2004, 3943 posts, RR: 21
Reply 8, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 5472 times:

Investors.

The number one goal of any publicly traded company is to maintain shareholder value.

Shareholder value in accomplished through many efforts, one of them is to instill demand for the stock.

Driving demand for the stock can be done is many ways; such as the marketing department setting the product line apart from its competition, or expounding the features and benefits of the product.

Boeing commercials are frequently seen on CNBC....the cable business news channel. But I've also seen them on MSNBC and CNN. Also present in other non-av related publications such the Wall Street Journal and New York Times.

The appearance of Boeing advertisements in av-related periodicals are targeted to the aerospace/aviation professional who is more likely to have such businesses he is familar with in his portfolio.

It's all about the Stock.



Delete this User
User currently offlineKappel From Suriname, joined Jul 2005, 3533 posts, RR: 17
Reply 9, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 5433 times:

Quoting SNATH (Reply 7):
This is what I was thinking too. But, given that most passangers have no clue what plane they are flying on, I can't see how it helps. Also, apart from a.nutters, most people make their reservations without any idea on what type of plane it will be.

So, I personally remain sceptical on the effectiveness of these ads.

Tony

exactly, besides, ads in FI won't be read by "mainstream" passengers either. Only by people interested in aircraft, and they'll know about the new planes already.



L1011,733,734,73G,738,743,744,752,763,772,77W,DC855,DC863,DC930,DC950,MD11,MD88,306,319,320,321,343,346,ARJ85,CR7,E195
User currently offlineSNATH From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3243 posts, RR: 22
Reply 10, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 5416 times:

Quoting Stirling (Reply 8):
Investors.

...and that is the most plausible explanation so far! Thanks!

Tony



Nikon: we don't want more pixels, we want better pixels.
User currently offlineORDagent From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 823 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 3 hours ago) and read 5345 times:

I also have seen LOTS of adds for Boeing Partners winglets in Airways and Airliners. Do that many airline executives read these wonderful geek magazines?!? They are pretty fun ads.

User currently offlineSATX From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 2840 posts, RR: 6
Reply 12, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 5291 times:

Quoting SNATH (Thread starter):
So, the question is: what's the point of such ads?

Not found until Reply #8

Quoting FlyingNanook (Reply 2):
The ads are targeted to the passengers.

It's targeted to small-time individual investors, many of whom are likely to also be passengers.

Quoting Centrair (Reply 4):
I guess they get the general public thinking about the experience.

This is just a side effect.

Quoting Afterburner (Reply 6):
They create "brand awareness".

Just another side effect.

Quoting SNATH (Reply 7):
But, given that most passangers have no clue what plane they are flying on, I can't see how it helps.

You've got the right amount of skepticism.

Quoting SNATH (Reply 7):

So, I personally remain sceptical on the effectiveness of these ads.

Hold tight, the correct answer is in the next reply...

Quoting Stirling (Reply 8):
Investors.

This is 100% absolutely correct. Small time, individual investors are the target audience for most ads that feature products the average consumer has no chance of purchasing. Actual clients and institutional investors have direct communication with the corporations who sell planes and other high-dollar commercial products.

Quoting Stirling (Reply 8):
Boeing commercials are frequently seen on CNBC....the cable business news channel. But I've also seen them on MSNBC and CNN. Also present in other non-av related publications such the Wall Street Journal and New York Times.

Excellent comment. Of course, if you get the bulk of your investment information from these sources, you're about a year or five too late to the party.  Big grin

Quoting Stirling (Reply 8):
It's all about the Stock.

100%!

Quoting ORDagent (Reply 11):
also have seen LOTS of adds for Boeing Partners winglets in Airways and Airliners. Do that many airline executives read these wonderful geek magazines?!? They are pretty fun ads.

Regardless if they do or do not, the ads are intended to sell stock to individual small-time investors.



Open Season on Consumer Protections is Just Around the Corner...
User currently offlineSNATH From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3243 posts, RR: 22
Reply 13, posted (9 years 1 month 1 week ago) and read 5170 times:

Quoting SATX (Reply 12):
Small time, individual investors are the target audience for most ads that feature products the average consumer has no chance of purchasing.

I take it these are potential investors both in the manufacturer ("We build the best planes, invest in us!") and in the airlines ("We are bying the best planes, invest in us!")?

Tony



Nikon: we don't want more pixels, we want better pixels.
User currently offlineIRelayer From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1073 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (9 years 1 month 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 5058 times:

It is the same principle as ads for British Petroleum or Exxon (not the station ads, but the actual corporate ads that tout their exploration for oil, or the recent BP "beyond petroleum" ads) or something, etc...you see these ALL the time and #1: people are going to buy gas no matter what, #2: noone cares about specific oil companies so long as they can fuel up their cars and #3: there is no direct consumer link between the TV audience and the product/service that is being promoted in the ad.

The purpose of these ads, in general, is public relations. These companies want to be viewed in a positive light by the general public, whether it be for selling stock, goodwill, public trust...there are a variety of reasons, some obvious, some subtle. They are confidence builders that convey a sense of the company to the general consumer with slick advertising. That is how you build a brand and become a household name. Boeing also has many, many ads that tout its space and defense buisnesses, an area that will never impact consumers in a direct way.

-IR


User currently offlineOHLHD From Finland, joined Dec 2004, 3962 posts, RR: 25
Reply 15, posted (9 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 4956 times:

SATX: perfect post!!!!!  Big grin

Very well explained!


User currently offlineYOWza From Nepal, joined Jul 2005, 4887 posts, RR: 15
Reply 16, posted (9 years 1 month 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4846 times:

SATX = on the ball.

YOWza



12A whenever possible.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 17, posted (9 years 1 month 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4792 times:

Quoting Afterburner (Reply 6):
They create "brand awareness".

 bigthumbsup 
Keeping people aware.A means of Advertising the Product.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineBackfire From Germany, joined Oct 2006, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (9 years 1 month 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 4746 times:

Quoting FlyingNanook (Reply 2):
The ads are targeted to the passengers. They see how great and shiny and new these planes are and they want to fly on airlines that use these planes. Airlines then have the pressure to fly the shiny new planes that passengers want because they saw them in a magazine.

Sorry - but that's nonsense. Passengers generally don't care which aircraft they're flying on. Boeing/Airbus don't advertise in business-to-business publications (and Flight International is a business publication, not a consumer magazine) to influence passengers.

It's partly to attract investors. High-profile advertising generates investor confidence in the company's stock, especially if it drives home a message of future success.

There is also a strong draw to maintain brand awareness. If Boeing is advertising and Airbus isn't, your first question wouldn't be: Why is Boeing advertising? Your first question would be: What's happened to Airbus? Companies don't like being noticed by their absence.

In addition there is still a degree of truth in the theory that advertisers are buying content. While reputable publications will maintain independence, there is always pressure to spin content to attract advertising.

Companies also like to reinforce their presence by placing, for example, glossy advertisements next to magazine features relevant to their product - because it's direct target marketing to those interested in its field of business.

If a trade magazine like Flight International writes an in-depth feature on the A350, Airbus might want to add its own bit of polish - and with an advertisement it can underline its own message and spoon-feed contact details to the reader. Don't underestimate the power of this sort of publicity.


User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5712 posts, RR: 18
Reply 19, posted (9 years 1 month 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 4722 times:

Quoting FlyingNanook (Reply 2):
They see how great and shiny and new these planes are and they want to fly on airlines that use these planes. Airlines then have the pressure to fly the shiny new planes that passengers want because they saw them in a magazine.

I think what really matters to most pax is the price, the service and maybe the ffp perks - not the make of an a/c - definitely not when it comes to A vs. B.
What's the point of flying "shiny new planes" when it's a flying cattle carriage aka Ryanair or some "legacy" airline with poor service, broken IFE and rude cabin crew?


User currently offlineKaitak744 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 2377 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (9 years 1 month 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4572 times:

GE made an add a while ago for their GE90 engine.

User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8964 posts, RR: 39
Reply 21, posted (9 years 1 month 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4565 times:

Quoting Kaitak744 (Reply 20):
GE made an add a while ago for their GE90 engine.

Check a Time magazine, always something of the sort. GE has it with pictures of their engines, locomotives and endless list of products.



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineRedChili From Norway, joined Jul 2005, 2284 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (9 years 1 month 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 4418 times:

Quoting Afterburner (Reply 6):
And Lion Air, whose fleet consists mostly of MD82s, names them "BOEING MD82". And in the newspapers' ads, they (the airlines) always write "We use large aircraft, Boeing 737"

Once, I was going to fly together with an Armenian guy on an SU B734. He knew beforehand that it was a Boeing plane, but when he saw how small it was, he refused to believe that it was a Boeing. He apparently thought that all Boeings are 747 size.

Boeing has really managed to get average people thinking that Boeing = big.



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