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Airbus Has Begun The A380’s Flutter-test Campaign  
User currently offlineKeesje From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 8178 times:

Regulators impose requirements aimed at ensuring double-deck giant’s crashworthiness matches existing airliners



Flight International

The US Federal Aviation Administration and European Aviation Safety Agency are seeking to make Airbus prove that passengers’ chances of survival in an A380-800 crash are equal to or better than in any other airliner.

The FAA proposal notes the A380’s greater volume should allow the airframe to absorb more energy on impact, which could reduce the forces felt by passengers and increase their chances of surviving the crash.

Airbus has begun the A380’s flutter-test campaign, which it expects to complete within 10 or 15 flights. The trials will be flown at progressively higher speeds up to the ultra-large aircraft’s maximum of 375kt (690km/h)/Mach 0.96.

http://www.flightinternational.com/A...vivability%E2%80%99+test+goal.html

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12150 posts, RR: 51
Reply 1, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 8057 times:

Quoting Keesje (Thread starter):
The trials will be flown at progressively higher speeds up to the ultra-large aircraft’s maximum of 375kt (690km/h)/Mach 0.96.

Mach 0.96? I thought the max Mach number for the A-380 is 0.86. But, it should easily be able to get to 375 KIAS, at and below FL290. Above FL290, 375 KIAS will be above Mach 0.86.

Quoting Keesje (Thread starter):
The US Federal Aviation Administration and European Aviation Safety Agency are seeking to make Airbus prove that passengers’ chances of survival in an A380-800 crash are equal to or better than in any other airliner.

The FAA proposal notes the A380’s greater volume should allow the airframe to absorb more energy on impact, which could reduce the forces felt by passengers and increase their chances of surviving the crash.

The A-380 should easily have the same or better crash survivability than any other modern airliner.

But, it's greater volumn (and weight and fuel capacity) would produce greater crash forces than, say a B-747-400 (given the same speed and other factors).

But, the greater size should spread any impact over a larger area. Thus spreading the impact and actually reducing impact forces on different sections while increasing it in other sections.


User currently offlineEatmybologna From France, joined Apr 2005, 412 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 7948 times:

So, how do they test for this? They can't crash one into the ground obviously.

e-m-b



Isn't knowledge more than just the acquisition of information? Shouldn't the acquired information be correct?
User currently offlineVasu From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 3921 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 7809 times:

Quoting Eatmybologna (Reply 2):
So, how do they test for this? They can't crash one into the ground obviously.

I was wondering the same...


User currently offlineOldAeroGuy From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 3527 posts, RR: 67
Reply 4, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 7680 times:

Timing for the flutter testing is interesting. I know flutter clearance is one first things that Boeing does when flight testing a new model. The logic is that if structural changes are needed, they should be started as soon as possible to preserve the Certification date, if feasible. In addition, you should show that the airplane structure is OK for all parts of the flight envelope as you're never sure of the flight conditions you may encounter as you explore handling characteristics.

Starting flutter tests four months after first flight seems a bit late, but I'm not sure if this is an Airbus standard practice.



Airplane design is easy, the difficulty is getting them to fly - Barnes Wallis
User currently offlineA350 From Germany, joined Nov 2004, 1100 posts, RR: 22
Reply 5, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 7194 times:

Quoting Eatmybologna (Reply 2):
So, how do they test for this? They can't crash one into the ground obviously.

They can, but they probably won't do it  biggrin 

Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 1):

But, the greater size should spread any impact over a larger area. Thus spreading the impact and actually reducing impact forces on different sections while increasing it in other sections.

That's a very important point. Actually, it makes the A380 unattractive for terrorists.

A350



Photography - the art of observing, not the art of arranging
User currently offlineVasu From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 3921 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 6958 times:

Quoting A350 (Reply 5):
That's a very important point. Actually, it makes the A380 unattractive for terrorists.

Maybe, but think of all those people onboard ... eek!


User currently offlineUdo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 6925 times:

Quoting Vasu (Reply 6):
Maybe, but think of all those people onboard ... eek!

Not worse than on Corsair or Japanese domestic B747s.


Regards
Udo


User currently offlineStealthpilot From India, joined May 2004, 510 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 6741 times:

The flutter test is an extremely important test. One method is to attach 'fluttering' appendages to the wing tips which cause major disturbances to the aerodynamics and flight control characteristics. It is amazing how something as small as they are can cause a huge aircraft to behave so sporadically.
-Nikhil



eP007
User currently offlineArt From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2005, 3382 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 6714 times:

Quoting Keesje (Thread starter):
The trials will be flown at progressively higher speeds up to the ultra-large aircraft’s maximum of 375kt (690km/h)/Mach 0.96.

Just a query on the figures here:

Mach 1 at sea level = ca 760mph/1260kph

Mach 1 at 36000ft = ca 640mph/1025kph

Can't see 690kph equalling mach 0.96 at any service altitude. Also, would they actually test an airliner up to mach 0.96 - strange things start happening this close to mach 1, don't they?


User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 6681 times:

Quoting Art (Reply 9):
Can't see 690kph equalling mach 0.96 at any service altitude. Also, would they actually test an airliner up to mach 0.96 - strange things start happening this close to mach 1, don't they?

They are talking about indicated airspeed, which indicates far slower than true airspeed due to the thin air at high altitude.

Charles


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