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Carrier Callsigns Assignment  
User currently offlineFaroeFlyer From Faroe Islands, joined Aug 2005, 87 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 4 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1932 times:

Who decides which callsign, IATA and ICAO code, a carrier gets?


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5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineZakHH From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 4 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1923 times:

IATA and ICAO, I guess...  Wink

User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4575 posts, RR: 41
Reply 2, posted (9 years 4 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1897 times:

Since it's an operational thing, I'm pretty sure it is just ICAO that designates an airline's callsign.

Unsurprisingly, the IATA code is designated by IATA, and the ICAO code by ICAO...

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlinePhilb From Ireland, joined May 1999, 2915 posts, RR: 13
Reply 3, posted (9 years 4 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1877 times:

Callsigns, as distinct from designators, are chosen by the airlines and some are historic: Speedbird, Springbok, to name but two.

The only interest the authorities have is that there is no duplication in the same operating area, the callsigns are both short and distinctive and are standardised.

These are all ATC concerns. Some years ago Arrow Air started using the call sign Big A unofficially. Both the British and German ATC authorities had this stopped until Arrow Air notified them officially of the change.


User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2255 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (9 years 4 months 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 1852 times:

Quoting Philb (Reply 3):
Callsigns, as distinct from designators, are chosen by the airlines and some are historic: Speedbird, Springbok, to name but two.

The only interest the authorities have is that there is no duplication in the same operating area, the callsigns are both short and distinctive and are standardised.

Years ago FEDEX used the callsign "express" but made the change to "fedex' for a couple of reasons. One there was some other carrier that started using an express call and there were some confusing moments plus I think fedex wanted a little more exposure with the "fedex" call.


User currently offlineFalcon Flyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1332 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 4 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1758 times:

UPS also changed their radio call from "upsco" to "ups" a while back. Prior to the Arrow/Fine Air merger when both carriers were competitors, Fine's radio call was "big eff", obviously as a dig to Arrow's "big a"


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