Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Hijacker Jumps Out Of An A330  
User currently offlineAirbus_A340 From Hong Kong, joined Mar 2000, 1560 posts, RR: 19
Posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 2058 times:

Today a man hijacked a Philipine Ailines A330. The hijacker then jumped out of the aft left door.
This sounds all very dramatic, can anyone add to this story or express you opinions?
thanbks!

heres the type of plane and airline

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Alan Tsui



trev*


People. They make an airline. www.cathaypacific.com
28 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAgrodemm From Greece, joined Apr 2000, 401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1871 times:

I wonder how he got the parachute on the plane... I mean it is not the first time to have guns/grenades in a plane.... but a parachute? Even folded it is still big enough to recognise.
By the way what would you say if you carried a parachute aboard, and being asked about that?
Regards,
emmanuel


User currently offlineIlyushin96M From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2609 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1856 times:

From what I've heard, first, the man took all the passenger's money and valubles, then jumped from the plane using a home-made parachute. As far as the parachute getting past check-in, it was probably only recogniseable as a large piece of cloth or a wrapped blanket, given that it was home-made.

Stranger things have happened. I'm sure many Forum members can recall the story of the famous bank robber D.B. Cooper, who hijacked a Northwest Airlines 727-100, then forced the pilot to fly low over the woods while he jumped from the rear airstairs. He was never found.


User currently offlineAirbus_A340 From Hong Kong, joined Mar 2000, 1560 posts, RR: 19
Reply 3, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1845 times:

Ok on news that i have heard.
A man got a parachute from the cockpit. im thinking, the pilots have parachutes.
OK i think im starting to believe Ilyushin96M now for his explanation. Hehehe imagin you carrying a parachute on board.
"uhh...excuse me sir, why are you carrying a parachute?"

hehe....i think this is humerous in a way but its actually happened.

trev*



People. They make an airline. www.cathaypacific.com
User currently offlineAgrodemm From Greece, joined Apr 2000, 401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1841 times:

Home made parachute?????
This guy must have been really desperate.... I mean, in order to make a jump, one should rely very much on the material-size-shape of the parachute, not to mention the enhancements and reinforcements in some parts. Also, the way the parachute is folded plays a critical part in the jump itself....
Any more details about D.B. Cooper, who hijacked a Northwest Airlines 727-100?
Thanks
emmanuel


User currently offlineAirbus_a340 From Hong Kong, joined Mar 2000, 1560 posts, RR: 19
Reply 5, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1816 times:

I agree with you Agrodemm, i think this man would have been very desperate if he made a home made parachute!!!

Any more news guys?
Has the man been found?
how can there bee such bad security latting an armed man on the plane and even more carying a parachute.
pathetic airport security!
Trevs*



People. They make an airline. www.cathaypacific.com
User currently offlineOozabooza From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1820 times:

Here is a link to the story...
http://cnn.com/2000/ASIANOW/southeast/05/25/philippines.hijack.03/index.html


User currently offlineCALPilot From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 998 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1811 times:

Ouch!

User currently offlineTeahan From Belgium, joined Nov 1999, 5287 posts, RR: 62
Reply 8, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1797 times:

How badly damaged is the plane? The door must have been forced open!

Jeremiah Teahan



Goodbye SR-LX MD-11 / 6th of March 1991 to the 31st of October 2004
User currently offlineDandy_don From United States of America, joined May 2000, 202 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1811 times:

Several years later a skeleton was found along with some of the marked money from that episode. Although there is no positive ID on the skeleton the money was definately the ransom. Most thoughtful observers conclude that DB died. The only other conclusion is that he didn't really want the money and left it behind

User currently offlineIlyushin96M From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2609 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1798 times:

Teahan, the pilot descended to a safe altitude to open the door so the hijacker could jump. Much the way the NWA pilot did for D.B. Cooper in the early '70s (I think it was). At lower altitudes, opening a door would not cause explosive decompression. Actually, I don't believe aircraft doors CAN be opened at high altitudes; I think unless they blow off, they are fail-safe, because pressurisation keeps them tight against the airframe. The pilot would have to descend, then deliberately decrease cabin pressure to allow a door to open.

User currently offlineC72 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1787 times:

If he jumped out of a front door, would he get sucked into the engine?

Steve


User currently offlineFleet Service From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 622 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1780 times:

If he didn't FOD an engine on egress, he'd likely fracture his skull/break his back on the leading edge of the wing or tail.lol


Yes, I actually *do* work for an airline,how about you?
User currently offlineAgrodemm From Greece, joined Apr 2000, 401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 1779 times:

Weird story this one, as well as the one of D.B. Cooper. It reminds me of a very sad incedent that happend in Greece some years ago...
A man (A Dutch citizen if I remember well) with his Scuba diving suit and gear was found burned in a mountain... what really happened: The poor-unlike guy was scuba diving in an area where fire-planes were diving to load with sea water... in one dive he was sucked in the plane and dropped in the burning mountain... He was found (I think) 3-4 years later...
Sad story  
Regards
emmanuel


User currently offlineHisham From Lebanon, joined Aug 1999, 701 posts, RR: 11
Reply 14, posted (13 years 11 months 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 1754 times:

There are no parachutes in the cockpit. Imagine the pilots jumping in front of the passengers: "Sorry guys the landing gear wouldn't go down."
When I was young I used to believe that the life vest under the seats are parachutes.  
Hisham.


User currently offlineTripl7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1725 times:

If you send me an e-mail I'll send you an entire article on DB Cooper from a recent Airliners issue.

User currently offlineHamlet69 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 2703 posts, RR: 58
Reply 16, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1695 times:

I live in Washington, and around here, the D.B. Cooper story is about as famous as Big Foot! I'm not completely familiar with the entire story, sad to say, but from what I've heard: A few bones (not a complete skeleton) were found, but no teeth for a dental match. Near the bones, some of the money was found buried . . . but not all of it. If you believe it, the current theory/folklore goes that these are the bones of a collaborator of Mr. Cooper, which were used, along with the money, to make people believe he had died. Officially, I believe D.B. Cooper is still listed as 'missing.'

Hamlet69



Honor the warriors, not the war.
User currently offlineCmsgop From United States of America, joined May 2000, 137 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1689 times:

I belive they found about $5700.00 by the Columbia River in 1980.

User currently onlineSamurai 777 From Canada, joined Jan 2000, 2458 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1655 times:

Speaking of security at Third World airports, is it any wonder why terroists, hijackers and other scum of the earth find Third World airlines and airports so attractive? Not to mention how easily the security people can be made to look the other way by bribing or other means of corruption.

User currently offlinePanman From Trinidad and Tobago, joined Aug 1999, 790 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1640 times:

Your statement is crass and uncalled for. As if that wouldn't happen in Europe or the USA (see American Airlines employees arrested for drugs).

I've been to a few 'third world' countries and their security has been on par with if not even better than the more 'developed' countries. Why do a fair percentage of these 'third world' countries have better literacy rates and education systems than their more well off counterparts?

Keep your rhetoric off of airliners.net please.


User currently offlineTimobear From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1638 times:

no, we don't have parachutes in the cockpit 
I could just about see the chaos: "well ladies and gents, please brace yourselves for a crash landing. Captain Smith and myself are gonna hand things over to our purser, Ms. Brown. Excuse us while we save our necks and oh yeah, thanks for flying ABC airlines!"
lol


User currently offlineJubilee777 From Singapore, joined May 1999, 528 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1630 times:

Latest is that the body of the "hijacker" was found...
The home made parachtute did not open.

J777


User currently onlineSamurai 777 From Canada, joined Jan 2000, 2458 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1628 times:

I'm very sorry if I have offended or insulted anyone here, and I know I really shouldn't have said that. (hanging head in great shame.) But remember, everyone's welcome to express whatever they want as long as it's on topic and not too hostile with foul and insulting language. While I do tend to say things without thinking first, I am in no way biased against people in developing nations or their ways! And don't even think that I'm some ignorant wanking jackass who doesn't know anything, either! (eyes flashing in anger)

As a matter of fact, it is true that there are quite a few developing nations do have respectable and even very high quality education systems compared to the richer nations. (Relaxing now) And with much lower taxes and more liberal free enterprises, you should see how much faster some of their economies have been growing. Yes, many airports there actually do have good or excellent security. Especially in Southeast and East Asia. But I have had a least a couple of friends who damned well near got detained or stranded, unless they bribed someone! And they didn't do anything criminal! (Once again, eyes growing angry and darkness overcoming my face)

What happens is there are many airports in Third World nations often lack the resources to improve the security checks. And also, there are government which lack the resources to police their countries effectively without having to resort to a large military presence in civilian areas (I'm told this is common in West Africa) even when there's no war, or having to resort to extreme penalties for crimes. The Middle East(not all of it though) is a good example, but that's due to their following the Shari'a, or Islamic law, if I remember correctly. A better example is Malaysia and Thailand, which have a death penalty for drug trafficking, but that is also a whole other story. (no expression here)

I'm not blind to the risks of terrorism or hijacking in the US or Europe, either, thank you. I've heard of quite a few stories about baggage handlers sticking drugs or other illegal stuff in other people's baggage, so that the owner's to blame when the security dogs come a-sniffing. And once, a plan by terrists to blow up as many as 10-12 airliners going in and out of the US was uncovered by the feds and Interpol before these guy got very far. Ever heard of the apalling practice of covering up shoddy security tactics at various US airports? Even after the Pan Am crash at Lockerbie, a good number of US airports still hadn't done much to improve security, even at JFK or ATL, a year later or so.

Many of my friends and relatives have travelled to places like Thailand, Korea and South Africa, and even Nigeria and they have experienced little or no problems at all in travelling there. (Grin)

Hope you accept my sincere apologies, but beware - if this or that "rhetoric" sparks a nasty war or worse, I will ask the administrator to remove the entire posting, topic and all! I am not here to cause trouble or offend others in this forum! (Relaxed stance, eyebrows raised)


User currently onlineSamurai 777 From Canada, joined Jan 2000, 2458 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1628 times:

Authorites did indeed find the body, but not the money. It seems like a grim irony of the D.B. Cooper case! Very likely, the money simply landed in a different location. According to the government, the motive was not political, but rather because the man had family problems.

This is the coverage from CNN:
http://cnn.com/2000/ASIANOW/southeast/05/25/philippines.hijack.05.ap/index.html


User currently offlineScand From Sweden, joined exactly 14 years ago today! , 34 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (13 years 11 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 1617 times:

News reports in Sweden this morning indicates that the man was found in a lake burried deep into the mud. Soldiers had dig the body out. The depth of the body indicates that the man hit the ground at high speed.
Apperntly the parashute seperated from the man right after he jumped. Scand


25 Post contains images Hmmmm... : There is no rule that forbids the carriage of parachutes as cabin baggage. I know of a skydiver who claimed he always flew with his chute as carry-on
26 J32driver : Most airplanes can't remain pressurized on the ground unless maintenance is performing a check. The pressurization systems are linked to a "squat swit
27 Post contains images Hisham : The poor guy! Hisham.
28 Post contains images Hmmmm... : Just for interests's sake, here is the second photo in that "D.B. Cooper" sequence. Notice the perfect skydiver form, arms out to the side, legs sprea
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Man Jumps Out Of Plane In San Diego posted Tue Mar 30 2004 07:46:19 by Futureualpilot
Cost Of An A330 posted Sun Apr 28 2002 09:41:50 by LanPeru
When An Airline Goes Out Of Business posted Sat Jan 7 2006 04:13:21 by Liedetectors
Why Did AN Sell Out Of America West posted Tue Apr 20 2004 00:12:45 by GREATANSETT
Who Is Operating AN-124's Out Of Kbgr Recently? posted Tue Jan 27 2004 03:35:53 by Pwm2txlhopper
An Int'l. Route Out Of MSY That Does Well posted Sat Apr 1 2000 06:08:08 by MSYtristar
When Will The 747 Be Out Of Passenger Service? posted Sat Dec 2 2006 02:17:47 by Scalebuilder
Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner? posted Wed Nov 29 2006 22:10:26 by N231YE
AA (Quietly) Pulling Out Of DAL Love? posted Wed Nov 29 2006 18:56:57 by SeeTheWorld
Secrets Out Of The Middle Seat posted Tue Nov 28 2006 00:45:43 by ATLAaron