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Iowa Airways  
User currently offlineUncGSO From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 344 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 4634 times:

Anyone know specifics about this carrier? I ran across a post card of Iowa Airways my dad got me in Des Moines in the early 80's....Also remember something about them being a Midway (ML) Connection carrier? Just curious as to what routes they flew etc....



23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineUadc8contrail From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1782 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4552 times:

uncgso,
iowa airways went on to become american central airlines in the early 80s and started to hook up with republic back then, they dropped the mdw cnx thing and basically flew from as far west as lnk to as far east as dtw, had a pretty big network but were streched thin by a small fleet, they were based out of dbq or alo(cant remember)and one of the co-owners was a retired chicago cop(neighbor)terry hudak.i flew on them one time from ord-alo and the routing went ord-dbq-rst-alo. they were shut down in dec of 84 by the f.a.a. iirc the only crash they had was a ferry flt from cid-dbq for mx work and it flew into a tornado near dbq



bus driver.......move that bus:)
User currently offlineKnope2001 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2875 posts, RR: 30
Reply 2, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 4427 times:

I think you might be thinking of Mid Continent, which became American Centrlal in 1981. American Central grew into a fairly broad network by about 1983/1984, flying smaller Piper twins and a fair number of Embraer Banderate aircraft. At various times, American Central served Dubuque, Waterloo, Cedar Rapids, Clinton, Marshalltown, Mason City, Ottumwa, Sioux City, Des Moines, Sioux Falls, Lincoln, Omaha, Kansas City, Rockford, Moline, Chicago Midway, Chicago O'Hare, Janesville/Beloit, Sheboygan, Oshkosh, Marshfield, Wisconsin Rapids, Minneapolis, Rochester, Manistee, Cadillac, Traverse City, Sturgis and Detroit. They were shut down in 1984 or 1985 for maintenence violations, and after they started up again they only lasted several more months. Based in Waterloo, American Central never code-shared with anybody and indeed shut down before code sharing became widespread. They were one of several small airlines that Republic joined with in their "One Ticket Way" program that was started back in about 1982 or 1983, and a few former Republic feeder markets taken over by American Central (like Oshkosh) even showed up in some of the Republic timetables. But they never code shared with any of these airlines, and Republic later dumped all these little airlines when they actually did start code sharing with Simmons and Express I as Repubic Express.

Iowa Airways started up roughly after the demise of American Central, although I don't know that there was any relation between the two. I seem to recall that Iowa Airways was related to Tennesee Airways. Iowa Airways flew on their own for a time on routes which included Dubuque-Cedar Rapids-Kansas City and Dubuque-Cedar Rapids-Des Moines-Omaha. Later they become a Midway Connection carrier, flying Waterloo-Dubuque-Midway and Midway-Elkhart-Benton Harbor-Midway. Iowa didn't last more than a handful of years if I recall correctly.


User currently offlineNotdownnlocked From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 929 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 4375 times:

I have an Iowa Airways timetable from 2/2/87 and at this time they had a single route OMA-DSM-CID-DBQ-MDW flown 2-3 times per day. I have more info in OAG's but they are not with me here. The schedule does show connecting services with Midway Airlines but no codeshares. One thing of interest is that if a flight is more than 15 minutes late the passenger gets a coupon for 50% off the next flight. Also their flights from MDW are only shown to DBQ and to no other cities and vice versa i.e. from OMA-DSM-CID-DBQ but not to MDW for some reason.

User currently offlineUncGSO From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 344 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 4274 times:

Quoting Uadc8contrail (Reply 1):
Iowa Airways started up roughly after the demise of American Central, although I don't know that there was any relation between the two.

Good info so far...Wondering if the Bandeirante pictured above was and old American Central plane judging by the N830AC?? And also cannot seem to find the iata code anywhere....any help on that?


User currently offlineKnope2001 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2875 posts, RR: 30
Reply 5, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 4219 times:

>>Good info so far...Wondering if the Bandeirante pictured above was and old American Central plane judging by the N830AC?? And also cannot seem to find the iata code anywhere....any help on that?<<

Wow...great catch on the AC tail number! I'd guess they acquired a former American Central aircraft after they shut down. American Central had more than a dozen Banderante, and at the time American Central stopped flying the aircraft type was still comparably desirable and so they found homes elsewhere pretty quickly. Those Bandits were 2x1 inside although you REALLY got to know your neighbor well if you were in one of the double-seats. I flew Amerrican Central MSP-SUX-LNK once, my first trip on this aircraft, and was stunned to see the little plane was three-across. It makes the current Jetstream J31's 2x1 layout seem spacious.

As for IATA code, that's the two-letter one, right? Iowa Airways was JT and American Central was JR.


User currently offlineAA717driver From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 1566 posts, RR: 13
Reply 6, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 4160 times:

I flew for Iowa Airways from March '86 to Sept. '86. We were owned by Tennessee Airways (aircraft and training from TN). We used the old American Central offices and hanger in Dubuque but there was no relation to ACA.

The aircraft pictured did come from ACA, as the tail number indicates. We had another one too (N850AC, I believe). Those were pretty good airplanes. The other aircraft were N101TN, N102TN and N103TN (I believe that's correct--those are the only others written in my logbook).

The trips started in DBQ. Two airplanes would leave DBQ in the morning for Cedar Rapids. There, one would leave for Kansas City and the other would leave for Omaha with a stop in Des Moines. They would both return to CID around late morning and one plane would go back to DBQ. Then an afternoon crew would take over and do two round trips to OMA and MCI respectively.

We had some really great people there and I still stay in touch with 5 or 6 of them. We were bound together by our disdain for Dubuque. But now we look back with fond memories of our time there. Adversity breeds fraternity or something like that.TC



FL450, M.85
User currently offlinePlanespotting From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3524 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 4145 times:

hey AA717driver, do you remember flying with Chris Faucconiere? His son was my roommate last year at the Univeristy of Dubuque. He used to be the chief pilot for Iowa Airways and is now a 737-900 Captain for CO.

I think everyone who leaves dubuque feels that way during and afterwards: disgruntlement while living there, fond memories after leaving. I left dubuque about a month ago and couldn't wait to leave, but now i talk to my buddies still up there and think of all the wonderful things you could do in dubuque...drinking..drinking...and more drinking...because seriously, thats all there is....



Do you like movies about gladiators?
User currently offlineAccess-Air From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1939 posts, RR: 13
Reply 8, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 4139 times:

Actually,
Iowa Airways NEVER had anything to do with MidContinent/American Central....

Iowa BAsed MidContinent Airlines did Change thier name to American Central in 1981 or so. American Central was originally based in Dubuque, Ia but then moved it Waterloo....
They started out with Piper Navajos and grew into Bandeirantes. They were eventually shut down in late 1985 or so due to a fatal crash with one of their Navajos and serious Pilot Training deficiancies and bad maintanace.
After that their planes did make the curcuit all over the place, especially the Bandits.
As for Iowa Airways.....
Stuart Adcock had a small commuter airline called Tennesee Airways and initially they flew Cessna 402s and later ordered a few Bandierantes.
They were based at Tyson McGhee Airport in Knoxville, Tn. They had even started a nonstop from TYS to IAD with the Bandits offering Meal service if you can belive that!!! I have the article in a Commuter Air magazine some place. Around 1985 he decided to start a local airline based in Dubuque, Iowa much like American Central did. He flew strictly from Dubuque Cedar Rapids to Des Moines to kind of replace the service void left by American Central. Eventually the business in Tennessee dried up and the whole operation was moved up to Iowa as Iowa Airways. Early in 1986, Iowa Airways signed a contract with Midway Airlines to become the first Midway Connection airline. The routes initially were strictly between Dubuque and Midway Airport but eventually included Waterloo. Then with the merger of Air Wisconsin and Mississippi Valley Airlines in May of 1985, 1986 saw the end of Air Wisconsin service in both Elkhart Indiana and Benton Harbor, Michigan. Iowa Airways/ Midway Connection added those two cities to their route system. They also picked up Flint, Michigan. The internal Iowa operations went by the wayside as all the resources were concentrated on the alliance with Midway Airlines. Eventually tho when the losses became too much and not enuff people were riding on Iowa Airways planes to and from Midway Airport...Once again the airline decided to move..this time out west and Changed its name once again, this time to Air LA..They dumped most of the Bandits and flew LAX-TIJ for a time...One of my pictures on here is of an Air LA Bandit I shot in LAX in 1993, in basic Midway Connection colours with a Tennesee Airways Registration and Air LA titles...
Eventually the Bandits were gone and they requipped with Mertos III's and Jetstream 31's....after that I lost track with whatever happened to them......
Maybe this will help you?????

Cheers, Access-Air

**(Not to be confused with Norfolk, Ne. based AAA Air Service that changed its name to Mid Continent Airlines that before ceasing ops, operated as Braniff Express out of Kansas City also using Cessna 402s and Bandits and Metro III's.)
*** Midway Airlines also had another Midway Connection carrier in 1986. Chicago Air Lines, formed by the heads of Midstate Airlines using Midstate's 6 Fokker F.27-500 until SAAB 340s could be added. There is much more to this story but thats another story....Ask me and Ill gladly inform you...



Remember, Wherever you go, there you are!!!!
User currently offlineTornado82 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 4094 times:

Quoting Knope2001 (Reply 2):
Midway-Elkhart-Benton Harbor-Midway

Elkhart had service? That's only a hop, skip, and jump from SBN. Surprising to me, although then again Valparaiso and Michigan City both had service back around that era too... but VPZ is much further from BEH, SBN, MDW, etc. than Elkhart is from SBN.

Quoting Uadc8contrail (Reply 1):
cid-dbq for mx work and it flew into a tornado near dbq

How the *@^* do you fly into a tornado?? First off, the Cb tower would have been overwhelming, not just some little puffy Cu buildup. Secondly, even in the days before the WSR-88D and today's weather technology, how would ATC and whatnot not know that there was some type of strong weather setting up in that general area at least and begin routing people around it. That's very odd to me as a meteorologist of how you could make such a fatal mistake.


User currently offlineAccess-Air From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1939 posts, RR: 13
Reply 10, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 4032 times:

Iowa Airways NEVER had anything to do with MidContinent/American Central....

Iowa BAsed MidContinent Airlines did Change thier name to American Central in 1981 or so. American Central was originally based in Dubuque, Ia but then moved it Waterloo....
They started out with Piper Navajos and grew into Bandeirantes. They were eventually shut down in late 1985 or so due to a fatal crash with one of their Navajos and serious Pilot Training deficiancies and bad maintanace.
After that their planes did make the curcuit all over the place, especially the Bandits.
As for Iowa Airways.....
Stuart Adcock had a small commuter airline called Tennesee Airways and initially they flew Cessna 402s and later ordered a few Bandierantes.
They were based at Tyson McGhee Airport in Knoxville, Tn. They had even started a nonstop from TYS to IAD with the Bandits offering Meal service if you can belive that!!! I have the article in a Commuter Air magazine some place. Around 1985 he decided to start a local airline based in Dubuque, Iowa much like American Central did. He flew strictly from Dubuque Cedar Rapids to Des Moines to kind of replace the service void left by American Central. Eventually the business in Tennessee dried up and the whole operation was moved up to Iowa as Iowa Airways. Early in 1986, Iowa Airways signed a contract with Midway Airlines to become the first Midway Connection airline. The routes initially were strictly between Dubuque and Midway Airport but eventually included Waterloo. Then with the merger of Air Wisconsin and Mississippi Valley Airlines in May of 1985, 1986 saw the end of Air Wisconsin service in both Elkhart Indiana and Benton Harbor, Michigan. Iowa Airways/ Midway Connection added those two cities to their route system. They also picked up Flint, Michigan. The internal Iowa operations went by the wayside as all the resources were concentrated on the alliance with Midway Airlines. Eventually tho when the losses became too much and not enuff people were riding on Iowa Airways planes to and from Midway Airport...Once again the airline decided to move..this time out west and Changed its name once again, this time to Air LA..They dumped most of the Bandits and flew LAX-TIJ for a time...One of my pictures on here is of an Air LA Bandit I shot in LAX in 1993, in basic Midway Connection colours with a Tennesee Airways Registration and Air LA titles...
Eventually the Bandits were gone and they requipped with Mertos III's and Jetstream 31's....after that I lost track with whatever happened to them......
Maybe this will help you?????

Cheers, Access-Air

**(Not to be confused with Norfolk, Ne. based AAA Air Service that changed its name to Mid Continent Airlines that before ceasing ops, operated as Braniff Express out of Kansas City also using Cessna 402s and Bandits and Metro III's.)
*** Midway Airlines also had another Midway Connection carrier in 1986. Chicago Air Lines, formed by the heads of Midstate Airlines using Midstate's 6 Fokker F.27-500 until SAAB 340s could be added. There is much more to this story but thats another story....Ask me and Ill gladly inform you...



Remember, Wherever you go, there you are!!!!
User currently offlineAA717driver From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 1566 posts, RR: 13
Reply 11, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 3947 times:

I'll tell you how you fly into a tornado. On several occasions the summer of '86 we would get reports of tornados on the ground less than 15 miles from our position either in IA or between DBQ and MDW. That was the worst weather I've ever experienced--before or since! (The summer of '92 in STL, when they had the floods was close but not quite.) Nearly every day we had to cross huge lines of TRW's going to MDW or DSM/OMA. I learned about thunderstorm flying from that... We did tons of 200-1/2 approaches in either fog or torrents of rain. Once on approach to RW06 in DSM lightning struck the runway as we were a mile or so out and knocked a big chunk out of the asphalt. Had to circle to 12. Great fun...NOT!

Planespotting--yes, Chris was there during my time. Great guy. Glad to hear he's doing well. TC



FL450, M.85
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 3938 times:

Quoting AA717driver (Reply 11):
I'll tell you how you fly into a tornado. On several occasions the summer of '86 we would get reports of tornados on the ground less than 15 miles from our position either in IA or between DBQ and MDW. That was the worst weather I've ever experienced--before or since! (The summer of '92 in STL, when they had the floods was close but not quite.) Nearly every day we had to cross huge lines of TRW's going to MDW or DSM/OMA. I learned about thunderstorm flying from that... We did tons of 200-1/2 approaches in either fog or torrents of rain. Once on approach to RW06 in DSM lightning struck the runway as we were a mile or so out and knocked a big chunk out of the asphalt. Had to circle to 12. Great fun...NOT!

That's right, brother...sometimes the weather here can open up a can of whoopass....especially when a big old line of storms comes roaring out of Kansas, across the south end of Nebraska and levels out cruising along at about 35 mph due west aiming RIGHT at ya....it's a sobering thing watching it take shape on weather underground...


User currently offlineTornado82 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 3900 times:

I'm well aware of how a line of storms forms... that wasn't my point. I was on a flight into ABE 2 Sundays ago when the lines of storms that basically closed down all 3 NYC airports formed. My point was in a tiny little plane like that, on a route like CID-DBQ which is 54.3 miles (according to Airnav.com)... so like 20 minutes flight time at the most... how would you even be released for takeoff with that kind of weather in the vicinity. It's not like you could get above a storm in that plane, and the weather was definitely at the very least shaping up into a solid TSRA+ before the plane even took off from CID, it seems like there was a case of get-home-itis since it was just a maintenance shuttle or something. Even in the case of pulse convection, it wouldn't go from clear skies to supercells and tornadoes in the time it would take a turboprop to fly 54.3 miles.

User currently offlinePlanespotting From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3524 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3855 times:

Tornado82

obviously you know a little about weather (i checked your profile) but I don't think you understand what it is like in the midwest during the summer time and how the stuff works. We're not talking about line thunderstorms (at least what they're referring to, obviously squall line thunderstorms are relatively predictable even in the summer months, at least a few hours before they are gonna be where you are). but in the summer time in Iowa (much like other places in the summer time) the moisture is present in the air from the 80 degree temps in the morning, which get heated up by the sun and form clouds that start rising, and yada yada yada thunderstorms form. These storms show up on radar first as relatively mundane summer thundershowers. Lots of these show up every day and stay just that (moderately intense thundershowers that quit about 10 mins after they start). However, sometimes these storms can hook up with another storm or if the conditions are just right, they start getting out of hand and may last from 30-45 mins. Often times you take off into some clouds that are reaching for the sky but appear to be the on the tame side, only to find out 5-10 mins later that in fact you have taken off into something you didn't really anticipate and would like nothing else but to get out of it and un-do your take off (often times this is figured out when there is seemingly nowhere to go but farther into the beast). It is a part of flying in the midwest and it's just accepted that if you're summer flyin, you should look out for that sorta stuff to happen.



Do you like movies about gladiators?
User currently offlineTornado82 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3837 times:

Quoting Planespotting (Reply 14):
obviously you know a little about weather (i checked your profile) but I don't think you understand what it is like in the midwest during the summer time and how the stuff works.

I went to school in the Midwest, and have even storm chased the CID area  Smile

Quoting Planespotting (Reply 14):
Lots of these show up every day and stay just that (moderately intense thundershowers that quit about 10 mins after they start). However, sometimes these storms can hook up with another storm or if the conditions are just right, they start getting out of hand and may last from 30-45 mins

My whole point was on a flight that should have only taken approx. 20 minutes of flight time, it had to be a VERY freak occurance for that storm to go from relatively tame (safe enough for a pilot/dispatch/etc to attempt flight through) into a monster in that short period of time. It takes some time for the thunder "showers" to turn to a supercell and drop their tornado, most tornadic supercells were at least stronger-than-average thunderstorms 20 minutes before touchdown of the tornado. If this plane was going DSM-MDW or something it would be more feasible that a storm developed in that kind of time frame, but on such a short little hop as CID-DBQ, it seems strange. If nothing else, while you can fly through those moderately strong thunderstorms, you sure as hell couldn't land in one in something of that size, and a supercell thunderstorm would be even bigger, and is going to have a footprint over a decent sized portion of the flight path of a 54.3 mile route... to the extent that you'd think they would have waited it out. In the 20 minutes it took for that ill-fated flight, that storm had to have at least been pretty menacing when they took off into it.

It just seems strange IMHO that nobody even noticed the evolution of this storm until it was too late on such a short route. I'm guessing that at the time a plane of that size was not equipped with a weather radar (??), and it was also definitely before the times of the "Nexrad"/WSR88D system implementation... so giving the benefit of the doubt I guess the technology just wasn't there for them to detect the situation back in the day. However for this to happen today to an airliner, though small as this one was, would have to be a case of gross negligence because there would just be too much technology out there. Even the AF accident in Toronto is seeming to steer less from the case of meteorological negligence, and more towards overshooting.

Not to discredit anyone's historical accounts... but are we talking an actual tornado... or possibly some type of micro/macro downburst situation instead? That would be MUCH more feasible in that short of an evolution time frame.


User currently offlinePlanespotting From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3524 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3806 times:

Quoting Tornado82 (Reply 15):
I went to school in the Midwest, and have even storm chased the CID area

thanks for the info. i stand corrected



Do you like movies about gladiators?
User currently offlineAA717driver From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 1566 posts, RR: 13
Reply 17, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 3710 times:

Tornados in the Midwest frequently (actually more frequently than from supercells it seems) form at the end of a line of weather. There were many days when we crossed a line between CID and DSM and another between DSM and OMA--then back again as we returned to DBQ.

Why did they release us? Because if they didn't, you would never go anywhere. Many of the lines stretched for hundreds of miles and had only a few breaks to negotiate.

Go over the cell? How about go under? You go to MVA and work your way around the cells or pick the narrowest point of the line. Hang on buckaroo! It worked in an E-110 AND the DC9.

Nexrad? It was 1987. We had green radar in the 110. In fact, this was just after the Air Wisc. Metro crash near OMA and we were only beginning to understand (or at least get the information to pilots) aircraft radar attenuation. Back then, you went and figured how to get through the weather when you were up there.

Like Planespotting said, from your profile, you certainly know the ins and outs of weather. I wish I had a better understanding of the mechanics of weather but there's only so much grey matter available (and it's dwindling!).

All I can say is that it's very different when you are in the air versus on the ground.TC



FL450, M.85
User currently offlineTornado82 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 3683 times:

Quoting AA717driver (Reply 17):
Nexrad? It was 1987.

Yeah I mentioned that too. WSR-88D means that it was developed in 1988.

Quoting AA717driver (Reply 17):
We had green radar in the 110. In fact, this was just after the Air Wisc. Metro crash near OMA and we were only beginning to understand (or at least get the information to pilots) aircraft radar attenuation.

I didn't think there would have even been a radar in something as small as a 110 that far back. Attenuation is never a good thing, green radars weren't very useful either.

Quoting AA717driver (Reply 17):
Tornados in the Midwest frequently (actually more frequently than from supercells it seems) form at the end of a line of weather

I don't know if I'd say more frequently, but yeah, agreed.
As I said before though, was it a definite "tornado" or more of a microburst/downburst situation?

Quoting AA717driver (Reply 17):
Go over the cell? How about go under? You go to MVA and work your way around the cells or pick the narrowest point of the line. Hang on buckaroo! It worked in an E-110 AND the DC9.

Excuse the ignorance, but what's MVA?

We went under a non-tornadic, though still VERY impressive on radar cell on approach to ABE in a ERJ-135 two weeks ago... I was shocked at the smoothness of the ride in a plane that size and a cell of that strength... once we got under the cell. The worst part of the ride was going on the outside of the cell, likely from outflow causing the shear/turbulence. ABE was about our only choice though if the wx had been any worse (it was our scheduled destination too) as many area alternate airports were also in severe wx at the time, so we did a few laps of holding and then shot the approach in a brief lull in the worst of it, followed by 5 other jets (diversions from EWR) in quick succession. 5 jets in a row a little ABE is unheard of  Smile

The outgoing part of the trip a few nights prior we shot approach into a dying thunderstorm which was primarily down to just heavy rain in FWA. That was in a B1900. It wasn't as bad as I expected either, but still pretty rough, and the lightning at night was pretty blinding.


User currently offlinePlanespotting From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3524 posts, RR: 5
Reply 19, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 3618 times:

Quoting Tornado82 (Reply 18):
Excuse the ignorance, but what's MVA?

minimum vectoring altitude (the lowest altitude you can go to where ATC radar can still see you)



Do you like movies about gladiators?
User currently offlineTornado82 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (8 years 11 months 1 week 19 hours ago) and read 3501 times:

Quoting Planespotting (Reply 19):

minimum vectoring altitude (the lowest altitude you can go to where ATC radar can still see you)

Thank you!!!


User currently offlineFlymli From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 53 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (8 years 11 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3424 times:

I realize this is an old thread, I hope someone will read this!
I was a ticket agent for American Central in DBQ. I worked from Jun 1981
to Oct 83. Please read carefully, I was on duty that night Dec 24th 1982,
the night that my friends Kurt Gannon and Kathy Mitchell crashed aprox
3/4 mile from the DBQ arpt. There was no tornado. This was a scheduled
termination flight SUX-DBQ. No pax on board, just some comat. I was
the only agent on duty, also the certified wx observer. It was a typical
snowy day as I recall, and with the snowfall, the visibility fell. I believe
the visibility was right at minimum that night. Its hard to type the rest.
They found them on a hillside on some farmers land near the arpt, aprox
7am Christmas Day. I guess the NTSB said pilot error. They were my
friends.
And by the way, I knew Chris Faucconiere! He was polished and
professional! I was 19 years old he probably doesn't remember me.


User currently offlineAA717driver From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 1566 posts, RR: 13
Reply 22, posted (8 years 11 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 3362 times:

Flymli--Sorry your introduction into aviation had to be so tragic. Chris is a good guy. Glad he's doing well at CAL.

Did you get another job in aviation?TC

P.S.--As much as we wanted out of DBQ, we fondly remember our first house (a rental) at 292 Roland St. in DBQ.



FL450, M.85
User currently offlineAccess-Air From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1939 posts, RR: 13
Reply 23, posted (8 years 11 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3321 times:

Flymli,

did you ever work with MaryBeth that works over at UAX at MLI?? She also used to work for American Central In DBQ...I was just curious.

Access-Air



Remember, Wherever you go, there you are!!!!
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