Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Russian Aircraft And Their Market Share  
User currently offlineOurboeing From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 475 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 10 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 4832 times:

I have always wondered about why Russian Aircraft are not given a fair chance in the aviation market. And I have heard many different answers and the most common ones being, their safety record and unavailability of spare parts.

I personally feel that Russian Aircraft are not given a fair chance to prove themselves as the aviation industry does not want anything beyond A and B. I think Tupolovs and Ilyushins and Yaks are as good.

Are Russian aircraft banned from flying into US Airspace? If not, why does Aeroflot use only Boeing aircraft on it US routes?

Thanks

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTaromA380 From Romania, joined Sep 2005, 334 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 10 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 4788 times:

- prior to sell, you have to invest *lot* of money preparing the market, the russians doesn't have it right now
- some of their aircrafts doesn't meet all the western certification requirements
- the engines are noisier
- the fuel burn is higher
- the technology level is a little older than western competitors
- maybe the airframe would cost less to acquire, but the costs to run and maintenance would cost more
- they don't have (yet?) any revolutionary product to make a strong impression on the market


User currently offlineFlySSC From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 7401 posts, RR: 57
Reply 2, posted (8 years 10 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 4788 times:

Quoting Ourboeing (Thread starter):
Are Russian aircraft banned from flying into US Airspace?

Well, not really !!!
You seem to forget that until the late 90s, Aeroflot and most of the former "East-European" countries were flying ONLY Russian (Soviet) aircraft to the U.S, particularly the IL62


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ken Rose
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ken Rose



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Frank C. Duarte Jr.
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Howard Chaloner



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Howard Chaloner
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Alastair T. Gardiner - WorldAirImages



SU still sends regularly its IL-96 to the U.S


User currently offlineRedChili From Norway, joined Jul 2005, 2208 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (8 years 10 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 4766 times:

Quoting Ourboeing (Thread starter):
I personally feel that Russian Aircraft are not given a fair chance to prove themselves as the aviation industry does not want anything beyond A and B. I think Tupolovs and Ilyushins and Yaks are as good.

Yaks? Do you seriously believe that for example Lufthansa should consider buying the Yak-42 to replace their 737s?

Quoting Ourboeing (Thread starter):
Are Russian aircraft banned from flying into US Airspace? If not, why does Aeroflot use only Boeing aircraft on it US routes?

Some of the older, noisier types are banned. I know that the T154, T204 and IL-96 are allowed to fly to Europe, but I don't know about the US.

Aeroflot uses Boeings because they only have six IL-96 planes, and because the dispatch reliability on those planes is really low. The IL-96 spends more time on the ground than in the air.

A few years ago, when Aeroflot had a fleet of some 115 planes and only 27 of them were A and B, those 27 actually earned 50 percent of the total SU revenue.



Top 10 airplanes: B737, T154, B747, IL96, T134, IL62, A320, MD80, B757, DC10
User currently offlineOURBOEING From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 475 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 10 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 4655 times:

Thats a lot of new info. Thanks guys.

User currently offlineAlessandro From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 10 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 4641 times:

Fair chances? A,B and E will dominate civilian air traffic in the future.
Beriev could sell some Be-210s though...


User currently offlineTripleDelta From Croatia, joined Jul 2004, 1114 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (8 years 10 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 4608 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
PHOTO SCREENER

The success of Russian airliners abroad depends also, at least it did back in the 90s, on an important fact - that Russian airliners are designed for Russian conditions and may be "overengineered" by Western standards. While yer average 737 (just an example, no offense to the plane  bigthumbsup  ) will fly in normally predictable and stable wx conditions, in a normal continental temperature range, from paved runways with a host of navigation and service equipment (that is the Western standard), a Tu-154 was designed with -40-ish temperatures, snow, rough runways, lack of ground support and survivability in mind. Hence their tough airframes and simple, time-tested systems.

The open spaces and low population density over most of the former Union, as well as present Russia, meant that noise pollution wasn't an issue, and the abundant oil reserves of the Azov Sea region, as well as the Urals, also placed fuel economy second to survivability.



No plane, no gain.
User currently offlineCOAMiG29 From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 515 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (8 years 10 months 4 days ago) and read 4501 times:

The safety??????? Russian planes are built to withstand much punishment than almost any others around, most are rough field capable and built to last. i think that honestly people are scared of what they don't know and something from behind the iron curtain is just that. do i have trouble flying on a soviet built jet? ABSOLUTELY NOT ive even worn a soviet Aeroflot shirt to the local mall and gunranges


If Continental had a hub at DFW with nonstop flights I would always fly them, unfortunantely good things take time.
User currently offlineRedChili From Norway, joined Jul 2005, 2208 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (8 years 10 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 4441 times:

The Russian planes are generally very safe if you take care of them properly. But if a major Western airline would buy some of these jets, I think that much of the traveling public would be scared away from the airline at the though of flying a Russian built plane.


Top 10 airplanes: B737, T154, B747, IL96, T134, IL62, A320, MD80, B757, DC10
User currently offlineJoni From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (8 years 10 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 4404 times:

I think that entering the large civil airliner market might be one good way to invest some of Russia's windfall from high oil prices. That would protect Russia's aerospave industry from declining and develop new know-how.

Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Boneyard Aircraft And Their Doors? posted Mon Apr 25 2005 06:36:38 by OptionsCLE
Aircraft And Their Cars posted Fri Apr 5 2002 11:06:29 by N2805WWest
Televangelists And Their Aircraft posted Mon Jun 5 2006 01:39:24 by CitationJet
NFL Teams And Their Airlines/Private Aircraft? posted Wed Feb 8 2006 17:51:13 by Sabena332
Famous/wealthy And Their Aircraft? posted Sat Oct 22 2005 17:07:33 by Gib
Heads Of State And Their Aircraft posted Sat Nov 20 2004 17:09:38 by Derico
MSY Market Share Info And Random Stats posted Wed Jun 30 2004 18:42:48 by MSYtristar
Iran And Russian Aircraft posted Thu Feb 21 2002 17:24:33 by Aviatsiya
Air Tran And Their Aircraft posted Tue Jan 1 2002 06:20:44 by 767-332ER
Will Aeroflot Ever Replace Their Russian Aircraft? posted Mon Jun 4 2001 01:38:32 by Airplanetire