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Emergency Escape Lighting  
User currently offlineOxygen From Hong Kong, joined Sep 1999, 674 posts, RR: 1
Posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2837 times:

Hey I have a question:

Why is that on some aircraft, there are flourenscent stripes stuck along the edges of the aisle, presumably for emergency escape, for example on this Cathay Pacific A340-300 economy class:


While some aircraft, the white stripe is not present? for example on this Cathay Pacific A330-300...

MyAviation.net photo:
Click here for bigger photo!
Photo © Jason Lau



The A330-300 in the picture is newer than the A340-300, by the way.
I understand that the flourenscent stripe are some new stuff, but then, where are the emergency escape lighting on the A330-300 in the second picture ?

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineLongHauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 4997 posts, RR: 43
Reply 1, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2810 times:

It is fitted to the underside of the seats, shining downward in an emergency. Both methods are effective and legal.


Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineIcaro From Spain, joined Nov 2004, 229 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2801 times:

In some airbus planes the lighting path is composed of some lights attached to the bottom of the aisle seats, usually every two rows, that's why you don't see anything on the floor.
Also floor lightning with real lights is being gradually changed in many airlines for the fluorescent type, much cheaper.


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2769 times:

The location can be floor mounted,which can be damaged by Pax stepping on them frequently.
The option is also to have them mounted on the outboard side of the seats.
The Idea is to illuminate the path in an Emergency.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineSabena332 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2756 times:

A few weeks ago I read an article in the Lufthanseat (LH's employee newspaper) about the company which is producing these fluorescent stripes, unfortunately I can't find the issue at the moment, the article was pretty interesting.

Patrick


User currently offlineLitz From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1765 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2738 times:
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It's also to be noted that these things DO work; in some of the cell phone pictures taken inside the Air France plane that landed/crashed in Toronto (posted back when the accident occurred), you can plainly/clearly see the emergency lighting at work, including the ceiling spots by the exit door.

- litz


User currently offlineJAFA From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 782 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2717 times:

Most of you are on the right path.

The strip has to "charged" by the cabin lights, so that they will glow in an emergency. They are to indentify where the exits are in a dark and or smoke filled cabin. The exits are always indicated by a contrasting color, or the work exit.

alternatively there are tiny lights mounted facing the aisle on the bottom portion of the aisle seats (only one side) generally they are white, with the exits marked by red lights. They are to NOT to illuminate the aisle but to identify the exits in a dark and or smoke filled cabin. In that scenario you would be low to the ground and possibly crawling on the floor. They do illuminate the aisle a little but that is not thier purpose. There are other lights moounted on the cieling and at the exits for emergency cabin illumination.

an older method are lights mounted on the floor covered by a clear plastic strip. same idea to show exits in a dark or smoke filled cabin. Where you be crawling on the floor.

Advantages are the strip doesn't have to turned on by a switch, but it does have to have exposure to light to be charged. Usually the cabin lights on full bright for about 15 minutes will do the job.

The lights on the seats have to turned on by a switch. On some planes this same switch activates the exit sign lights.


User currently offlineCOEWR From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 273 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2703 times:

PM or email me if you are interested in this information. I have some promo materials from "PhotoLum" (the guys that make the "Saf-T-Glo" product) since I work for CO as the lighting engineer.

-C


User currently offlineTod From Denmark, joined Aug 2004, 1727 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2653 times:

Saf-T-Glo is becoming more popular all the time, but as of January 2005 Boeing's official line (ref: 777-FTD-33-05001) was that it did not plan to certify it's use on the twin aisle aircraft it builds.

That said, I know it was certified by the FAA and installed on the ex-UA 744 that Corsair is operating.

Tod


User currently offlineMatt72033 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 1617 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2636 times:

Quoting Litz (Reply 5):
It's also to be noted that these things DO work; in some of the cell phone pictures taken inside the Air France plane that landed/crashed in Toronto (posted back when the accident occurred), you can plainly/clearly see the emergency lighting at work, including the ceiling spots by the exit door

course they do, there not just there for show! lol
checked on every daily!


User currently offlineCOEWR From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 273 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2637 times:

Saf-T-Glo came installed on COs "new" 757-300s (read: ex-ATA birds). They are the only planes that mainline CO has this product on (of course Express Jet has it on their RJs). It is quite an interesting product.

-C


User currently offlineIFixPlanes From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 239 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (8 years 11 months 3 days ago) and read 2554 times:

The Moderator Sabena332, who criticize LH most of the time, read our Lufthanseat! I am impressed.
Are you searching for new shit you can throw?

Anyone else find Infos for Guideline® here:
http://www.lufthansa-technik.com/guideline/welcome/welcome.html



never tell an engineer he is wrong ;-)
User currently offlineSabena332 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 11 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2471 times:

Quoting IFixPlanes (Reply 11):
The Moderator Sabena332, who criticize LH most of the time, read our Lufthanseat!

Yes, I am reading the Lufthanseat.

Quoting IFixPlanes (Reply 11):
I am impressed.

Wunder gibt es immer wieder.

Quoting IFixPlanes (Reply 11):
Are you searching for new shit you can throw?

In the Lufthanseat?

Patrick


User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 13, posted (8 years 11 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2442 times:

Quoting Icaro (Reply 2):
Also floor lightning with real lights is being gradually changed in many airlines for the fluorescent type, much cheaper.

Also much longer life so much less frequent replacement/testing

Quoting Litz (Reply 5):
It's also to be noted that these things DO work;

You can also find out they work by riding on a NW A3xx with an inopp APU. FA upon arriving at the gate at LAX and after engine shutdown: "Had this been an actual emergency landing you would follow the lights that have illuminated to the nearest exit, and always remember the nearest exit may be behind you. Please do not open the emergency exits and thank you for flying Northwest Airlines"

Quoting FA" class=quote target=_blank>JAFA (Reply 6):
The strip has to "charged" by the cabin lights, so that they will glow in an emergency.

I am, of course, no expert on the subject, but the use of glow "tape" (as we referred to it when I dabbled in theater) makes sense... Any airlines using electroluminescent lighting? I would imagine that the MX impact is similar but you don't have to worry about it being "charged" (or fading out if the cabin lights are off)


Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineOxygen From Hong Kong, joined Sep 1999, 674 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (8 years 11 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 2308 times:

Hey, thanks for the answers! They are much clearer to me now.

Best Wishes,
James


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