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Boeing Use Of Rfid On 787 Program  
User currently offlineMrComet From Ireland, joined Mar 2005, 561 posts, RR: 8
Posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 4443 times:

I thought this was pretty cool. Boeing is mandating all supplies tag their parts with radio frequency identification devices that allow Boeing to store supply and maintenance information directly on the part. I am not sure if this helps them build them faster, maintain them better or both but it seems pretty cool.

The article can be found here


The dude abides
5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBlatantEcho From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1922 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 4377 times:

hope they have more success than Wal-Mart.

George



They're not handing trophies out today
User currently offlineStoney From Switzerland, joined Jan 2005, 199 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 4313 times:

There was some big talk in Switzerland about that being used in the future for all kinds of stuff, foremost food. The fridge would notice what would be missing and order that stuff by itself over internet from some market..

The big problem with that is that every chip costs about 70 cents (once mass production begins) and that's too expensive for such a large quantity of cheap things.

But because Boeing is using it for expensive stuff, these 70+ cents don't really matter and I guess once RFID is used for all the supplies they could save lots of money (labor costs)

Anyway, cool system......

Greetz
Stoney



BAZL - Bundesamt gegen Zivilluftfahrt - royally screwing around with swiss aviation
User currently offlineBoeingBus From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1597 posts, RR: 17
Reply 3, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 4239 times:

I believe Airbus has a joint agreement with Boeing and their suppliers to do the same. This is the direction the industry is heading.

US passports will start using these tags. Therefore, even before you head through customs they will know you are there. Real cool


Walmart is not having success is not due to the technology but politics and privacy issues.



Airbus or Boeing - it's all good to me!
User currently offlineN328KF From United States of America, joined May 2004, 6491 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 4205 times:

Quoting BoeingBus (Reply 3):
I believe Airbus has a joint agreement with Boeing and their suppliers to do the same. This is the direction the industry is heading.

http://www.globalaviationrfidforum.com/



When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.' T.Roosevelt
User currently offlineJet-lagged From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 877 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4124 times:

Quoting MrComet (Thread starter):
I am not sure if this helps them build them faster, maintain them better or both but it seems pretty cool.

My understanding is that the primary area of benefit is in the area of maintenance after consruction. For example, keeping information about a parts installation, testing, etc. It can also help to find parts, literally, in spares rooms or on the aircraft itself. It may also help avoid counterfeits.

On the 'build' side, when components are made, they or their packing often end up getting covered in numerous bar codes with different data and formats, which could potentially all be replaced with a single RFID tag that gets updated through the value chain.

Quoting BoeingBus (Reply 3):
I believe Airbus has a joint agreement with Boeing and their suppliers to do the same. This is the direction the industry is heading.

Yes, they've run a number of joint conferences and have been agreeing common standards.

There are three major RFID initiatives - retailers (EPC standard from GS1 as promoted by WalMart, Tesco, Metro, etc) using 96 bit tags for cases and pallet supply chain visibility, the DOD which I think also uses the EPC 96 bit tags, and Boeing/Airbus which use 64M tags for item level processes. I think that Airbus/Boing will eventually become the standard for other industrial products and markets too.

Quoting BoeingBus (Reply 3):
Walmart is not having success is not due to the technology but politics and privacy issues.

Also, the business case for their manufacturers is not as good as for the retailers. So, with the exception of some of the largest, most innovative consumer goods companies, they are reluctant to implement and foot the bill for millions and millions of tags.


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