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Why Would AA Get This Fine?  
User currently offlineWhataboutme From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 173 posts, RR: 1
Posted (9 years 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2071 times:

http://money.cnn.com/services/ticker...ONESDJONLINE000707_FORTUNE5.htm...
I read this and thought that yes AA was a little at fault here, but if a person does not have a ticket shouldn't TSA have stopped him at security checkpoint.
Ann Davis stated he had an itinerary on a paper ticket, looking like a boarding pass. Correct me if I am wrong here, but isn't TSA personal suppose to look at photo ID to match a name on a ticket or boarding pass to the ID. HMMMM... I feel TSA needs to be blame for this because someone at the checkpoint did not do their job properly.
What do you A.netters feel about this? Who do you think should be held accountable for this incident?

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineWhataboutme From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 173 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (9 years 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2054 times:

Sorry the link isn't coming up. Here is the article.

American Air Faces Fine After Ticketless Man Boards Plane

November 8, 2005: 13:32 p.m. ESt

NEWARK, N.J. (AP)--American Airlines could be fined up to $25,000 for allowing a New Jersey man to board a flight without a ticket or boarding pass.

Airline and federal officials were left baffled this weekend when Danis Ballard, 29, of Irvington, N.J., boarded the the plane. American Airlines officials say that federal airport screeners should have kept Ballard off the Miami-bound flight Saturday morning.

A spokeswoman for the U.S. Transportation Security Administration said it was the airline's job to keep him off the flight. The airline could be fined up to $ 25,000 for allowing Ballard on board.

Ballard was found and taken off the flight before it took off. He was charged with criminal trespass.

Authorities said the man used a worthless, printed flight itinerary to board the plane.

TSA spokeswoman Ann Davis told The Star-Ledger of Newark for Tuesday's newspapers that the man inquired with a ticket agent at the airport about buying a same-day ticket. He didn't buy one, but he was given an itinerary on paper stock similar to what is used for boarding passes and used that to get past security.

(END) Dow Jones Newswires


User currently offlineIAirAllie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (9 years 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2024 times:

TSA is responsible for allowing the passenger through the security checkpoint. They are responsible for checking ID and tickets. Correct me if I am wrong but didn't AA catch the mistake and remove the pax prior to departure? If that is the case then they were doing their job.

User currently offlineWhataboutme From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 173 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (9 years 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2013 times:

AA did catch it and removed him from the aircraft, but how did he get on. An AA agent wasn't doing their job either. They made the mistake for boarding him, however if TSA stoppped him at the airport, he would not have made it back to the gate and this would not have happened.

User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21562 posts, RR: 59
Reply 4, posted (9 years 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1993 times:

Quoting IAirAllie (Reply 2):
They are responsible for checking ID and tickets. Correct me if I am wrong

You are wrong. There is another thread about this, but basically, TSAs sole responsibility is to confirm the person has A ticket or ITINERARY to fly that day, and isn't carrying weapons.

The airport is the one checking IDs against tickets or itineraries. That's why they wear rent-a-cop uniforms, not TSA uniforms. And they did their job, because this guy likely showed the printed itinerary, on proper airline card stock, and his ID to security, and they matched!

It is the Airline, in cooperation with DHS, that is required to check who the pax are and make sure there is nobody onboard who shouldn't be onboard. So it is AAs fault that they provided a valid itinerary to someone who isn't flying, then let that person on their aircraft. That's why they were fined. They were COMPLETELY at fault...

TSA is a DEPARTMENT of DHS, it is not ALL of DHS and doesn't do all of DHS's jobs.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineIAirAllie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (9 years 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1963 times:

I know I am correct about the first part of my post. The "correct me if I am wrong" was in reference to the latter portion. The airport security personelle TSA, rent a cop whoever at the checkpoint is responsible for verifying that every person to pass through that checkpoint has a ticket. If that is not the case then why I am I required to show my ID/Airline badge/and or ticket when passing and "keep it out!" (as some Agents are so fond of barking) when I go through the magnometer?

User currently offlineWhataboutme From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 173 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (9 years 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1963 times:

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 4):
The airport is the one checking IDs against tickets or itineraries. That's why they wear rent-a-cop uniforms, not TSA uniforms. And they did their job, because this guy likely showed the printed itinerary, on proper airline card stock, and his ID to security, and they matched!

If you get a paper itinery at the airport with an Airline's ticket stock on it, it doesn't have a persons name on it. So that intinery he had would not have had his name on it. So TSA should have seen no name on that paper ticket looking thing he had.
I know when I travel TSA always looks at my ID and the name on the ticket I have to see that it match. Why would a AA agent at the ticket counter put
Danis Ballard's name on it, if he wasn't purchasing the ticket?


User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21562 posts, RR: 59
Reply 7, posted (9 years 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1937 times:

Quoting IAirAllie (Reply 5):
The airport security personelle TSA, rent a cop whoever at the checkpoint is responsible for verifying that every person to pass through that checkpoint has a ticket.

The TSA and rent-a-cop do not work for the same agency! How hard is this to understand.

TSA checks for weapons and explosives.

The rent-a-cops work for the airport and are required to be there by DHS.

The airlines are required by DHS to make sure that the people on their planes are supposed to be there.

TSA did it's job. Everyone is getting on TSA's case here and in the other thread, but did this guy have a gun or a bomb or a knife and get through? Not that I read...

And there may be a failure of the rent-a-cops if they didn't check the ID, but there is no evidence that they didn't check the ID.

Quoting Whataboutme (Reply 6):
So TSA should have seen no name on that paper ticket looking thing he had.

You know that for a fact? You know that the itinerary he had on AA card stock or printed on paper from AAs computer did not have his name? Funny, because I have had itineraries printed for me in the past with my name clearly at the top, both by AA and CO. I've also had some that didn't. So I'm not willing to claim his didn't have his name on it until I know more.

Something tells me though that he probably got the idea to try it because it did have his name on it and once he got past the rent-a-cops, he felt emboldened. But that's just a guess.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineWhataboutme From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 173 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (9 years 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 1791 times:

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 7):
You know that for a fact? You know that the itinerary he had on AA card stock or printed on paper from AAs computer did not have his name? Funny, because I have had itineraries printed for me in the past with my name clearly at the top, both by AA and CO. I've also had some that didn't. So I'm not willing to claim his didn't have his name on it until I know more.

I have received many itineraries from airlines at the airport and I never recalled my name being on it, but I did not look at it that clear, but why would an airline print an itinerary on paperstock with a passengers name on it,especially if that person wasn't planning on flying? Just my thought on that.
2 mistakes were made here and AA should not be the only one to get blamed for it.


User currently offlineElectech6299 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 616 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (9 years 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1620 times:

Quoting Whataboutme (Reply 8):
AA should not be the only one to get blamed for it.

That's true, but the cruel fact is AA's gate agent failed to verify that the passenger had a boarding pass. That's a serious offense. Whatever else went wrong isn't clear yet...

By the way, hundreds of people go through TSA's gates every day without a boarding pass. Those who work for FAA, the airport or vendors, the airlines, and various other trades, some of whom will fly and some who won't. If it's true that this person got past the checkpoint with a printed itinerary and no other "passable" ID, then I suspect that itinerary procedures will be changed, or else lots of people will be getting itineraries to see loved ones off at the gate like we all used to...



Send not to know for whom the bell tolls...it tolls for thee
User currently offlineKahala777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (9 years 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1593 times:

The American Airlines Gate Agent, was guilty of not verifying the fact that the passenger was sans a boarding pass. How on Earth, did this happen? Was this a case of a Ground Staff trying to puch for an ontime? Was this a case of an employee that didnt take their job seriously?

KAHALA777


User currently offlineAa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3350 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (9 years 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1569 times:

How did this happen at all? What did the computer do when the agent scanned the "boarding pass"? I know it is virtually impossible to board the wrong aircraft these days, as the computer knows where the boarding flight is flying, and where you are flying. Shouldn't the computer raise a red flag when the paper being scanned isn't even a boarding pass?

AAndrew


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