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Man Caught In Aircraft Propeller  
User currently offlineDogfighter2111 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 1968 posts, RR: 1
Posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 8557 times:

Hey,

Apparentyl this happened today on the Isle of Wight.

BBC News: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/hampshire/4437168.stm

How often does this happen? Not heard of this sort of error in a while.

Thanks
Mike

46 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineJsposaune From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 292 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 8277 times:

Quoting Dogfighter2111 (Thread starter):
How often does this happen? Not heard of this sort of error in a while.

Too often, unfortunately...amazing the guy lived.

Reminds me of the agent killed by a USX DH-8 about 4 1/2 years ago at DCA. Just thinking about it makes me physically ill.

Safety first, people.



There are no stupid questions....only stupid people!!!
User currently offlineDLKAPA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 8183 times:

Its always important to know where the prop is at all times, particularly if you're doing something like jump-starting a metroliner from a tug, where you plug the tug into the metroliner via a socket on the number 2 engine about 2 feet aft of the prop. Wait till both engines are on and running, then carefully approach from behind, pull the plug, and egress from behind. Not that this incident involved jump starting a metro I just thought I'd throw it out there... Safety first  Wink

User currently offlineDogfighter2111 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 1968 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 8081 times:

Thanks for replies guys. I think i remember the incident at DCA. Pretty sad, yet you should be aware of your surroundings.

Thanks
Mike


User currently offlineHPRamper From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4058 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 8041 times:

DCA seems to have an inordinate number of fatal accidents.

User currently offlineGQfluffy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 8032 times:

Quoting DLKAPA (Reply 2):
Its always important to know where the prop is at all times, particularly if you're doing something like jump-starting a metroliner from a tug, where you plug the tug into the metroliner via a socket on the number 2 engine about 2 feet aft of the prop. Wait till both engines are on and running, then carefully approach from behind, pull the plug, and egress from behind. Not that this incident involved jump starting a metro I just thought I'd throw it out there... Safety first

At GQ, all of our old Metroliners had the GPU plugin on the FO's side next to the main gear. Of course these were Metro IIIs and Metro 23s. We did have to bring on another Metro which did have the plugin on #2. One worker in an outstation supposedly slipped on ice while unplugging and his/her foot actually slid underneath the prop. The prop never touched it. This is, of course, just rumor, but still something that actually could happen. Kind of strange they would build a design like this...


User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6385 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 7970 times:

A Few years ago, when I was a lineboy at LRU (general aviation), I was working an airshow, and had marshalled a guy flying a Beechcraft D-17. I had chocked his A/C, and the guy decided he wanted to move to the classic/display ramp. I had to escort him with a "Follow Me" vehicle, but before I could pull the chocks, I heard the starter turn, and immediately dove away from the prop arc. Good thing!

Moral of the story: proper flight line protocol is to yell "Clear!" or "Clear Prop!" before engaging a starter on a prop-driven aircraft. I do this religiously to this day as a private pilot. This guy never said anything, just pulled the starter handle.

BTW I came to find out the Staggerwing owner, who nearly turned me into chopped sushi, was a captain for a major airline who shall remain nameless...



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineDLKAPA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 7942 times:

Quoting GQfluffy (Reply 5):

You'd think it'd be much safer to put the thing out toward the wingtip, it wouldn't be a horrible weight imbalance to add a pound or two of wiring to the wing, hell they could even put one on both sides to "make it easier on ground crews" aka balance the weight.

I'm not sure about the Metro III's configuration but I was standing about 20 feet from a guy while he was plugging the GPU into the engine on a Metro II.


User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 7889 times:

One of the rules I learned growing up around airplanes is always be aware if the nav lights are on. If they are on, steer clear of the ship's engines as the crew is probably about to start them. Our private airplane, a C414A has tiedown points located at the tail and aft end of each engine nacelle. The first thing that we do in the preflight prep is remove the tiedowns and all chocks. Prior to engine start we scan the surrounding area for activity. If there is none, we'll proceed with engine start. If the ramp has a lot of foot traffic, we'll either wait a moment or make the "clear prop" call.


"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 9, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 7864 times:

Safety First.
Always move Around a Propeller as if its Functioning at all times.
Always stand away from a Thrust Reverser as if it would operate anytime.
Thats my method at work,although at times Im ridiculed for it  Smile
But I know Im right.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineDogfighter2111 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 1968 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7640 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 9):
Thrust Reverser

A quick question, if you were to stand where the panels moved to show the inside of the engine when Thrust Reverse is deployed e.g. B767, would you get blown away? Just like if you stood in the wake or behind the engine when it was increasing power.

Thanks
Mike


User currently offlineDLKAPA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 7292 times:

Quoting Dogfighter2111 (Reply 10):

Wanna be our guinea pig? Big grin


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 12, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 7247 times:

Quoting Dogfighter2111 (Reply 10):
A quick question, if you were to stand where the panels moved to show the inside of the engine when Thrust Reverse is deployed e.g. B767, would you get blown away

Yes.A T/R reversers the Thrust.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineEI747SYDNEY From Ireland, joined Oct 2005, 703 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 7219 times:

Guys, there was an incident at DUB round about 1999 involving a guy working on the ramp for servisair. An emereld airways had come in and while he signalled to the pilots side window that the chocks were in he backed into the still moving propeller. I started dispatching there a few years later and this was at the forefront of all the safety talks.

Rob  wave 



''Live life on the edge, Live each and every day like it's your last, Hell you only live once''
User currently offlineFumanchewd From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 7193 times:

You would be suprised with what ground workers do with propellors. When I used to be a lineman, we would turn the props horizontal after the aircraft had been fueled to let both the pilots and other fuelers know that it had been done. Most people are aware to be attentive and to stand clear with just the tips of your fingers when doing it. A broken lead can cause the magnetos to fire and start her up.

Or this could have been the case of a prop-start which is very dangerous, even for people who do it often. I once saw a brand new Mooney owner (don't get me started) leave his wife in the plane while he tried to prop start the plane. He hadn't applied the brakes hard enough and the airlplane broke one of its tiedowns and smacked into a Bellanca that was parallel to it.

ALWAYS WATCH PROPS ON LINE.


User currently offlineEI321 From Iraq, joined Jul 2009, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 7180 times:

Quoting EI747SYDNEY (Reply 13):
Guys, there was an incident at DUB round about 1999 involving a guy working on the ramp for servisair. An emereld airways had come in and while he signalled to the pilots side window that the chocks were in he backed into the still moving propeller. I started dispatching there a few years later and this was at the forefront of all the safety talks.

I remember that. Am I right in saying that poor guy was killed?


User currently offlineEI747SYDNEY From Ireland, joined Oct 2005, 703 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 7170 times:

Quoting EI321 (Reply 15):
I remember that. Am I right in saying that poor guy was killed?

He sure did. The incident report is on the website of the Irish equivalent to the NTSB.

Rob  wave 



''Live life on the edge, Live each and every day like it's your last, Hell you only live once''
User currently offlineFumanchewd From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 7147 times:

Quoting DLKAPA (Reply 2):
if you're doing something like jump-starting a metroliner from a tug, where you plug the tug into the metroliner via a socket on the number 2 engine about 2 feet aft of the prop.

HMMM. I remember both the Merlin and Metro having the plug 2 feet in front of the starboard. It's been awhile, but I definitely remember the Merlin prop behind me when pulling the GPU. Beech 99's and Starships can be pretty hairy too. (Not that Starships matter too much anymore). One of my favorites was pulling a GPU off of a LR24 or LR25. Quite a few times a flame approximately 4 feet long would shoot out of the back of the engine, approximately 2 feet from my face.


User currently offlineDogfighter2111 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 1968 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 6967 times:

Quoting DLKAPA (Reply 11):
Wanna be our guinea pig?

Gee, thanks. Although that may be fun. A bit like a roller coaster Big grin

Quoting EI747SYDNEY (Reply 13):
Guys, there was an incident at DUB round about 1999 involving a guy working on the ramp for servisair. An emereld airways had come in and while he signalled to the pilots side window that the chocks were in he backed into the still moving propeller. I started dispatching there a few years later and this was at the forefront of all the safety talks.

Shame the guy died, but it was his own fault for not looking. And funnily enough i can't remember this one happening.

Thanks
Mike


User currently offlineContrails From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 1833 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 6779 times:

DCA seems to have an inordinate number of fatal accidents.

Really? I can only recall 2 since 1987. Am I missing something?



Flying Colors Forever!
User currently offlineOttoPylit From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 6758 times:

Back around 1998, I believe, a bag driver got killed in ATL by running into an ATR prop. Apparently, it was raining that night, and he was in a hurry to get it done so he could get out of the downpour. He had a couple of bags to drop off at an EV ATR. These birds are loaded a little wierd. The main baggage bin is on the left forward side of the plane, right behind the cockpit. But in the back, there is a smaller bin on the right side of the tail, where you can store any overflow bags as well as the plane-checked carryon luggage. He apparently pulled up to one side, but they told him they were full and to go to the other. It was near departure and one engine was running up. He had his rain gear pulled down low to minimize the rain coming in and his head partially turned to keep rain from flying into his eyes. Instead of pulling away from the plane to go around, he drove under the wing and thats that. Thankfully he probably didn't even know what hit him. I heard the engine was destroyed(naturally) and they had to have a professional pressure washing company come in and wash the stain off the tarmac. Sad.


OttoPylit


User currently offlineGQfluffy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 6550 times:

Quoting OttoPylit (Reply 20):
It was near departure and one engine was running up.

I guess I don't understand why they had one engine turning while they were still loading bags. Sounds like a very stupid SOP to me. They were litterally ASKING for this accident to happen...


User currently offlineDarthRandall From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 302 posts, RR: 3
Reply 22, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 6496 times:

Yikes, ouch! Poor guy. You gotta respect dangerous equipment like that. All I can think of is that one scene in Raiders of the Lost Ark. That always made me cringe.


Ninjas can kill anyone they want! Ninjas cut off heads all the time and don't even think twice about it.
User currently offlineTallguy14 From United States of America, joined Jul 2002, 228 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 6294 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

What about the mechanic who was ingested in the 737-300 engine in Moscow a few years ago? This happened at night, in front of a horrified gateroom of passengers. Pretty gruesome.

http://www.pilotosdeiberia.com/prensa/moscowtimes_150704.htm

Jeff


User currently offlineAccess-Air From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1939 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 6196 times:

I guess also a Ramp Agent at OHare for American Eagle also indasvertently walked into a prop on an ATR. She was of course killed.
A number of spotters along with myself watched, as much as we could tell, a worker had his or her legs crushed by an SAS 763 on the International Tarmac at OHare. They were pushing it back to tow over to CO's gates as that was the practice back in 1989 or 90. Nose gear rolled right over them.
Not fun...
Yeah I remember watching Britt and Air Midwest Metro agents having to plug the GPU into that plug-in on the #2 engine....Eek, I couldnt imagine standing that close to an idling Garret TPE 331 engine. Sheesh the noise is deafening....
ON startup the props seemed to be in fine pitch until the pilots put it into forward pitch. I had observed on occasion that when they would move the props into forward pitch, the plane looked like the props would go into reverse pitch for a second or two and the plane would move backwards a bit and then forward...
One question, I do have is that more ofthen than not, I would also observe many a Britt pilot hand spinning the props on their Metro IIs. Was this to purge unburned fuel out of the engine??? Does anyone know??? I think I have even seen Jestream 31 Pilots do the same thing....
Usually afte the engines had been shut down for a while.

Access-Air



Remember, Wherever you go, there you are!!!!
25 Post contains links and images EI747SYDNEY : http://www.aaiu.ie/AAIUviewitem.asp?id=4024&lang=ENG&loc=1280 This is the incident report........ Rob
26 Dogfighter2111 : Danke Monsieur. Thanks Mike
27 Dougloid : I think I'd have been seriously tempted to open up a can of whoopass on this mofo.
28 GQfluffy : Most pilots are kind enough to change the pitch of the props so there isn't alot of wind while you unplug #2. At GQ, we thankfully only had one aircr
29 Smcmac32msn : I never turn my back on a propeller as a lineman. Last spring, one of the girls I work with parked a King Air 100 and as I put a cone on the outside w
30 Smcmac32msn : This technique is only on Garret engines such as the King Air 100 (only a few with mods), Cessna 441 Conquest, the Merlin/Metro series aircraft.....
31 CWAFlyer : The Metro II and early Metro III had the GPU jack on the nacelle on the right engine. It was a bit hairy to say the least unplugging it. You would unp
32 Post contains images GQfluffy : So...did this chick go out with her "hero" afterwards?
33 OttoPylit : I am not sure if it was that particular aircraft he was driving around to another or what. In ATL, they can stack those AT7's 4 high on one gate. Eve
34 Dogfighter2111 : Do they even wait for the engine to stop? Isn't that what they are supposed to do? Thanks Mike
35 Post contains images EI747SYDNEY : Some ramp agents (not all) can get very used to their job and surroundings and would take chances that you or I might think ludicrous. But they do it
36 Dougloid : I am a factory trained TPE331 heavy maintenance specialist (among my other accomplishments although it HAS been a few years) and I ran a TPE331 overh
37 GQfluffy : I, for one, am guilty of this. I've caught myself walking under our 1900D's wings while the props are turning. Sure there's at least 5 feet between m
38 BHMBAGLOCK : You wouldn't want to be around a high volume skydiving operation. Typical SOP is to load passengers with both engines turning. Several larger operati
39 Smcmac32msn : Your right, I'm sorry. I had a brain fart when I wrote that. It is because of shaft bowing that we do it. No, I didn't get a date from her. I should
40 N723gw : This reminds me of what happened to an F9 ramper in MKE when I was working for C8. (F9 ran the ramp in MKE for C8) The Saab pulled into the gate and s
41 Smcmac32msn : I thought I had heard something about that right after it happened. Heard it from a friend who worked at C8 in MSN at the time. That is a very sad st
42 Bhill : Folks, I'm curious, why not put the connectors in that aft section or out on the wing as others have suggested? Granted, it migh add a bit of weight,
43 GQfluffy : I think Fairchild wised up and changed the location of the plugin. At GQ, the only a/c we had that had the plugin on #2 was a sub for another a/c that
44 DLKAPA : The plugin for the earlier Metro's is one bad type of operational planning, but how about Mitsubishi with their brilliant lack of foresight when placi
45 Crjflyer35 : Another thing to remember as a pilot when yelling "Clear", don't yell it than automatically crank 'er over. Give a good few seconds for anyone who, s
46 Wrighbrothers : This reminds me of the poor guy who got sucked throught a BA ( or was it BOAC) 747 engine, lossing his arm and leg. He was fortunate to suvive, the re
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