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First B787 Engine Test Successful  
User currently offlineFlytweed From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 84 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3274 times:

Here's the story:

http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wi...story?coll=ny-region-apconnecticut

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSthPacific787 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3213 times:

A bit misleading as it was only the APU  confused 

User currently offlineMD80fanatic From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2660 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3191 times:

APU startup is considered a "milestone". Hmmm, sensationalistic reporting I'd say.

User currently offlineLehpron From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 7028 posts, RR: 21
Reply 3, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 3071 times:

Quote:
SAN DIEGO, Calif. -- Hamilton Sundstrand announced Monday that it has completed its first engine test of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner's auxiliary unit.

Well it doesn't have quotes, so the responsibility falls on the journalist for being as ignorant as the rest of the world. Hence: Only a negligible percentage of the population will notice.  Yeah sure



The meaning of life is curiosity; we were put on this planet to explore opportunities.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 4, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2985 times:

Change the Title in the Thread.  Smile
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineScbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12568 posts, RR: 46
Reply 5, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2971 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

And they said the A380 progress was over-hyped?  scratchchin 


Time flies like an arrow, but fruit flies like a banana!
User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5824 posts, RR: 11
Reply 6, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 2830 times:

Considering that the whalejet crashes anything that flies within 50 miles of her wake, yes, I'd say THAT whole project was over hyped.
And yes, the development of a new APU is news worthy, particularly to our community. What happened, you don't like aviation news any more? Of all people to be interested in a new airliner APU, one would think it would be that members of AIRLINERS.net.... duh...
If it were to be attached to the A350, it would still be newsworthy, in my opinion. I'm not being pro-Boeing here.
And in the hometown of the manufacturer, well, of course the paper publishes it. Would you expect the Toulouse News, Reviews, and Skews to ignore the development of the A380? Hardly.

Anyhow, good job Hamilton.


User currently offlineLY4XELD From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 857 posts, RR: 15
Reply 7, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2751 times:

Quoting SthPacific787 (Reply 1):
A bit misleading as it was only the APU   

An APU is an engine, just not one that provides thrust, so it's not that misleading.



That's why we're here.
User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2547 times:

Quoting MD80fanatic (Reply 2):
APU startup is considered a "milestone". Hmmm, sensationalistic reporting I'd say.

What exactly is your definition of a milestone? While it's not exactly earthshattering great news, it's still a milestone. APU startup has to happen. APU's are very important for an aircraft. Therefore, the functioning of the APU is a milestone that both A & B consider to be important. Sit down and read about the pains B went through to make sure the APU on the 777 would be ETOPS ready when the plane launched.



There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlineDLKAPA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2504 times:

How far along is GE in their engine development?

User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9643 posts, RR: 52
Reply 10, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2398 times:

Quoting MD80fanatic (Reply 2):
APU startup is considered a "milestone". Hmmm, sensationalistic reporting I'd say.

It was a huge mile stone for Hamilton Sundstrand since that is one of the most sophisticated parts that the company is putting on the airplane. Although you will never see the Hamilton Sundstrand brand name on the 787, the company makes some of the most important electrical (and other) parts on the plane that are essential to operation. Some of these are small, but also some of the most expensive parts on the airplane. Hamilton Sundstrand announced this accomplishment with a press release today. That doesn't mean that you have to read it, but rather for those that want to know about the development progress of the 787, then it is good information to have.

The APU somehow warranted a press release while other key parts have not. However the release came out today yet the test was October 31. This is a huge deal for all of the engineers at Hamilton Sundstrand. It took a lot of work to get that done. The massive electrical generator for the 787 is in the test phase as well. I am working on that project and it is a huge undertaking spending millions and millions of dollars. While the generator isn't a significant milestone as far as the public is concerned, it is a huge deal within Hamilton Sundstrand. While it may not seem like a big deal to aviation enthusiasts, hundreds of engineers along with countless more people have been working hard to keep the various 787 power generation units on schedule.

I take pride in the fact that I as an individual am one person at Hamilton Sundstrand in a giant group encompassing multiple corporations that are working hard to get this plane ready to fly on and on schedule. I have definitely worked some late nights to make sure that parts on this plane does not fall behind schedule. I may be one small person doing a seemingly small part, but the test stands to test the generators (and other 787 electrical components) that I design and implement are extremely important. While I am not asking you to get incredibly excited over this event, I ask that you respect that fact that it is a major accomplishment that many people have dedicated months of their lives to see happen. I am proud of the fact that if the work I do doesn't get completed, then the 787 will not be able to fly. I love aviation and love the fact that I am working towards the future of air travel. It is not sensationalism to release a press release, so I request that people don't belittle the accomplishment.

Here is a copy of the press release that is almost exactly what the article says:

November 15, 2005

In a major program milestone, Hamilton Sundstrand successfully completed its first engine test of the APS 5000 auxiliary power unit (APU) for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner airplane.

This first test was performed on Oct. 31 at HS Power Systems facility in San Diego, California.

Hamilton Sundstrand was chosen by Boeing to provide a wide array of systems for the 787 and expects the program will generate more than $8 billion in revenues over its life.

The APU was started using the new HS auxiliary starter generator and operated at 100% speed under the control of the auxiliary power unit controller. Following an inspection, the APU will undergo a series of performance and load-transient testing.

"We have power!" said Walt Gillette, Boeing vice president and program manager for the 787, as he noted the successful test marked a significant milestone for the Dreamliner program. "To go from contract award to testing a system in only 22 months demonstrates the agility and skill of Hamilton Sundstrand and the Dreamliner team. Working with our international team of partners, we are making terrific progress on the airplane."

Tim Morris, president of HS Aerospace Power Systems, said, "This is just the start of many key milestones for an array of systems to be developed for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and typifies the system integration capability that Hamilton Sundstrand brings to the program."

Bob Ridgeway, vice president and general manager of Hamilton Sundstrand Power Systems, said "Clearly, we could not have achieved this major objective without the outstanding leadership of Joan Inlow and the dedicated Hamilton Sundstrand APU team in San Diego, our suppliers and the guidance and support of Dan Buchacher and the Boeing APU team in Everett."


[Edited 2005-11-15 20:10:50]


If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineMauriceB From Netherlands, joined Aug 2004, 2490 posts, RR: 25
Reply 11, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2364 times:

djeez before you know they pop-up a topic wich say's ''first window for 787 produced'' wich is NOT interresting , just like this

User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4896 posts, RR: 16
Reply 12, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 2157 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 10):

RoseFlyer, keep up the great work, and feel proud of what you have accomplished - all us a.netters are grateful to you and the many engineers that make the miracle of aviation possible.

It's unfortunate that so many engineers make these amazing and creative contributions, but never get the credit for it. There's no credit roll like in the movies, so you just have to be satisfied with a job well done with the rest of your team, and move on to the next challenge.

I, for one, am glad that there are dedicated young engineers like you who make my life a lot better and safer. Kudos to your team of unsung heroes at Hamilton Sundstrand!


 thumbsup 


User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 977 posts, RR: 51
Reply 13, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 2122 times:

Quoting DLKAPA (Reply 9):
How far along is GE in their engine development?

Propulsion test will begin in 2006.


User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9643 posts, RR: 52
Reply 14, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 2030 times:

Quoting Comorin (Reply 12):

Thanks for the kind words. It seems that a lot of people take it for granted that planes are meticulously designed to the highest standards possible. Aviation is such a safe mode of travel because of the work of thousands of engineers designing every system with multiple fail safes along with the work of those that go on to maintain and operate the airplanes. Airplanes don't grow on trees. It is a lot of work from dedicated individuals. Even things as simple as a piece of glass were meticulously designed and selected to meet strict safety requirements. Everyone on Anet gets caught up in the big press events like first flight, formal launch, and order announcements, but the true work goes on where no one sees it and it isn't lauded as a spectacular event.

I say congratulations to my colleagues in San Diego that were able to successfully build and test the APU. Of course there is still a lot of work to be done, but congratulations on what has been accomplished. Let us show some American pride in that quality aviation products can still be designed and tested in this country and that Americans are hard workers and capable of achieving many milestones as some of us are the best that there is!



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineWhiteHatter From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 2012 times:

Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 6):
Considering that the whalejet crashes anything that flies within 50 miles of her wake, yes, I'd say THAT whole project was over hyped.

and then...

Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 6):
I'm not being pro-Boeing here.

Really?

Anyway congratulations to whoever for testing the APU. Hopefully it won't get hot and start melting plastic...


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