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When Is The Decision Made To Divert For A Medical?  
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Posted (8 years 8 months 4 weeks ago) and read 8056 times:

Hi All,

I was flying today (12/25, Christmas), and on the IAH-ONT segment, about an hour before we were scheduled to arrive at Ontario all of a sudden "[Ding] At this time we need to ask that any licensed medical professionals on board, such as a M.D., R.N., or E.M.T. please ring your flight attendant call button immediately, again, any licensed medical professionals..."

There was a gentleman on board who was a paramedic (coincidentally, we had been talking about that in the gate area prior to boarding), who went to the rear galley (738) and did his thing... From what one of the flight attendants was telling us, a defibrillator was involved, and there was quite a bit of interphone dinging and flight attendants running from front to rear and viceversa. The gentleman continued working in the back of the aircraft until just prior to landing.

We continued on to Ontario, landed and taxied to the gate normally, where we were met by quite an assortment of equipment (3 airport police vehicles, 2 ambulances, 1 non-airport fire vehicle, 1 airport CFR vehicle, and a few trucks just labeled ONT), and paramedics came on board before anyone was let out of their seats (understandably)

Anyways, this event I was wondering (a) what drives the decision to divert or continue to the original destination, (b) who makes that decision (I guess ultimately it's the captain's, but does the 'medical professional' have input?) (c) what would have happened had there not been anyone with a medical background on board?

Also, just as a side note, the cabin crew on this flight was one of the best I've ever had (and that's saying something for CO!) -- and their reaction when I gave them Merry Christmas/Thank You cards was quite unexpected (made the effort feel very worthwhile).

Lincoln


CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
45 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineWerdywerd From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 573 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (8 years 8 months 4 weeks ago) and read 8031 times:

Here at jetblue we have "Medlink" where FA's can contact a doctor on duty on the ground to tell him/her the situation on board. The doctor will give their recommendation as to whether divert immediately and land or continue on to the final destination. If the recommend a diversion the FA will notify the Captain and the captain will make the final decision which 99.9% along with whatever the doctor says to do.
If they are close enough to the final destination and the final destination is closer than a diversion, the Capitan will obviously land at whatever destination will get them to the ground quicker. Also I believe with a situation like this that the aircraft gets priority landing wherever they are headed.


User currently offlineCO767FA From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 532 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (8 years 8 months 4 weeks ago) and read 8016 times:

At CO, we also have "Medlink", but we also ask for additional assistance from any qualified Nurses, Doctors and/or EMT's. In the OP message it appears s/he was traveling aboard one of our flights.

The customers health and well being is paramount, but we try to avoid unnecessary diversions because of the expense and inconvenience; but sometimes that just can't be avoided.


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (8 years 8 months 4 weeks ago) and read 8015 times:

Quoting Lincoln (Thread starter):
Anyways, this event I was wondering (a) what drives the decision to divert or continue to the original destination, (b) who makes that decision (I guess ultimately it's the captain's, but does the 'medical professional' have input?) (c) what would have happened had there not been anyone with a medical background on board?

A) The Captain...
B) The Captain...
C) The Captain would land the plane at the closest airport...



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineChiGB1973 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 1615 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 7994 times:

I guess ultimately it is up to the captain, but Medlink is the decision maker. The captain can choose not to, but it is highly doubtful that this would ever happen. If the medical is obvious as to what the captain should do, of course, he is going to do it. Most of these guys are very smart. I do not recall any I did not trust, obviously, with my life. Some had personalities that left a little to be desired, but that is a moot point.

One of the last trips I flew was out of Bangor and just short of half way to SNN, we had a medical and had to return to YQX. I believe that was the routing. The cool thing is I did get to talk to Medlink on the radio. There were so many things to consider. This guy would have been in SNN vs Gander, which was a lot closer to home, there was weather, communication problems, overweight problems. It was a mess. He wound up being fine on the trip back to Gander. As far as follow-up, I have no clue. I wish I knew.

What a long day that was!

M


User currently offlineGo3Team From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3267 posts, RR: 16
Reply 5, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 7942 times:

As heartless as it may sound, has any airline ever tried to recoup the expenses incurred during a divert? Say if a passenger was feeling ill, and thru a fit about needing medical attention, the plane diverted, and all it was, was a case of gas. In that situation, I can see no problem with the airline wanting its lost money back. On the other hand, someone feeling ill before a flight, they have a heart attack, and a diversion is necessary for them to get the medical attention they need. Should the airline try to get their money back then?


Yay Pudding!
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6204 posts, RR: 30
Reply 6, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 7905 times:
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Today, most airlines have "Medlink" Some airlines as SOP will try to get someone trained in medicine alongside Medlink. Some don't. Defibrillators are very nice, but, as far as I know, they are useless in a heart attack. They are used for cardiac arrest, which might be a consequence of a heart attack. You'd be surprised however how many airlines carry "first aid kits" that actually look like operating room kits, and the amount of training in medical emergencies that the F/A's have.

If the airline has access to Medlink, the captain will follow their reccommendation. If they don't, but have a doctor or other medically trained person reccommend the diversion, the captain will also follow that advice. If no medlink, and no medical trained passengers on board, the captain will require constant updates on the passenger's condition. If it is obviously worsening a diversion will be the likely result.



MGGS
User currently offlineMas777 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 1999, 2935 posts, RR: 6
Reply 7, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 7889 times:

I was called to an emergency on a flight once - this was probably in the infancy of Medlink and other medical link-ups now in operation. I saw this chap and figured he might have been having a coronary.

There was a nurse on board too who came to see what was happening but she was very odd and I found her to be rather useless. The captain basically gave me the decision to make. He came back to the rear of the plane where the passenger was and advised me of 'our' options and he asked 'do you think we should turn back?'. I remember replying (in a slightly nervous state) - 'you're the captain' and he smiled and replied 'you're the doctor!'.

It was a fairly easy decision to make (as I failed to agree with the 'nurse' (?) who seemed more bothered about her connection and suggested we gave him some soup (???)) as we had a long flight ahead.

We turned straight back to KUL as I scoured through the medical kit (looking for a coat-hanger and bottle of whiskey... I remember thinking... - lol - as that incident had just happened) having just crossed over Sumatra and the passenger was off-loaded to an awaiting medical team at KUL.

I wish I could find out what happened to the passenger. I will always remember his wife being so distraught and as I spoke to the medical team at KUL - it turned out that her husband was in a rush to get back to the UK to see his cardiologist and she was concerned that he would now miss his appt...

...good call I thought to myself when I heard her say that...


btw - post-script and disclaimer - to anyone who might want to try this - there is absolutely NO use for a coat-hanger and a bottle of whiskey in treating a possible myocardial infarction - apart from hanging up your coat and drinking that bottle of whiskey perhaps.  Smile


User currently offlineRDUDDJI From Lesotho, joined Jun 2004, 1483 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 7887 times:

Here at UA, we have our own medical department who is generally involved with these type of situations. When I started with UA, I had to get a physical at ORDEX and while I was there I heard a flight call in with a medical emergency (it was relayed from the flight deck onto their speakerphone). One of the Nurses went to get a Doctor who took the call and went through everything with the crew. I thought it was pretty cool that UA had their own medical team.


Sometimes we don't realize the good times when we're in them
User currently offlineShlomoz From Israel, joined Jun 2000, 95 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 7879 times:

I was on an El Al flight last week from TLV to JFK that diverted to Rome for a medical emergency. The call, ultimately, was made by the captain, but it was a doctor among the passengers who was asked to give medical attention that told the captain what to do.

We landed and were diverted to what seemed like a remote part of the airport - no jetway - just stairs. El Al security (not Rome police) appeared out of nowhere and secured the perimeter of the aircraft and even checked-over the paramedics who came onboard to take the passenger off.


User currently offline3201 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 7821 times:

Dr. Rumack:
Captain, how soon can you land?
Capt. Clarence Oveur:
I can't tell.
Dr. Rumack:
You can tell me, I'm a doctor.
Capt. Clarence Oveur:
No, I mean, I'm just not sure.
Dr. Rumack:
Well, can't you take a guess?
Capt. Clarence Oveur:
Well, not for another two hours.
Dr. Rumack:
You can't take a guess "for another two hours"?

Quoting Lincoln (Thread starter):
(a) what drives the decision to divert or continue to the original destination,

Usually if there's a MD on board the captain asks their opinion, just like in Mas777's story... and of course,

Quoting Mas777 (Reply 7):
the 'nurse' (?) who seemed more bothered about her connection

the folks on board want to get where they're attempting to go, not to divert!  Smile But obviously if it really is life-threatening, they'll advise, as did Mas777, to divert.

I know a physician who has been called to help at least 2 times, I think actually more (he flew a lot), and always advised to continue to planned destination. This was a while ago, but he reported signing something saying that he was opening the sealed first-aid kit, and got thank-you letters from the airlines in question afterwards.

Quoting Mas777 (Reply 7):
apart from... drinking that bottle of whiskey perhaps

yeah I think he got offered some of that from the FA's as well.  Silly


User currently offlineAirlinerfreak From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 7812 times:

A question here, is the person who is ill held financially responsible for the diversion?

User currently offlineChiGB1973 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 1615 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 7802 times:

There is a "cocktail" for heart attack that includes aspirin, nitroglycerine and oxygen, all of which are available on the plane. The fourth ingredient is a clot-busting medication that is not available on the plane, nor in most pre-hospital settings. So, the ingredients are there, it is a matter of training that makes the difference.

In 1/2 of heart attacks, the heart does go into a ventricular rhythm with the only treatment, except in very, very few cases, is defibrillation.

As a flight attendant, I attended one chest pain customer in 2 1/2 years. There were a few other medicals, but nothing like this poor guy. He insisted on not diverting as he was going to see his dying sister in PIT. Medlink was contacted and agreed to the continuation of the flight to Chicago. I doubt he was allowed on to PIT, but I do not know. I am also a paramedic. The training was helpful with this and one other case, but otherwise I was fairly lucky not having sick people on the plane.

M


User currently offlineTheGreatChecko From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 1128 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 7773 times:

In my experiences, the captain, FA, and dispatcher are all on the "phone" with Medlink. If the doctor recommends a diversion, he will also recommend a city, and the dispatcher and captain must concur (obviously). The doctor doesn't have all the airport info on hand (weather, etc.) so if it doesn't work, the Captain would then ask for another option.

Quoting AR385 (Reply 6):
Defibrillators are very nice, but, as far as I know, they are useless in a heart attack. They are used for cardiac arrest, which might be a consequence of a heart attack.

Actually, its the other way around.  Smile

A defibrillator converts an irregular rhythm to a normal rhythm by momentarily stopping the heart and allowing it to "reset" itself. It will not do a thing if the heart has completely stopped and is in asystole (aka flat line). Medications would be needed to assist the heart in that situation.

Automatic External Defibrillators are very useful and will save the life of someone that has recently experiences a sudden cardiac arrest, especially if applied in the first two minutes.

GreatChecko
EMT-B



"A pilot's plane she is. She will love you if you deserve it, and try to kill you if you don't...She is the Mighty Q400"
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 7767 times:

The Medlink doctor makes the decision to continue or divert, and while the doctor may suggest a certain airport, it's up to the captain and dispatcher to determine if the airport the doctor mentions is suitable. For example, the doctor may suggest AMA, but the doctor has no way of knowing that AMA is 1/8 mile in fog with RVR below minimums. The captain and dispatcher hash that out, and if another close-by airport has good weather, say, LBB, we'll divert there, or someplace else that's suitable.

User currently offlineAPFPilot1985 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 7754 times:

In the days before medlink, I was on a flight with my mother from RSW to BUF and they asked for medical professionals to please press the button. My mom was the only one on board who called. She is a nurse and a former FA. A gentleman on-board was having angina attacks. Basically she just got him on 02 and the captain called her up to the flight deck and asked her if we should divert.

User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 16, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 7722 times:

Thanks for all the replies, it's interesting to know what goes on when something like this happens (and that I'm in good hands if something unforseen were to happen).

Quoting CO767FA (Reply 2):
At CO, we also have "Medlink", but we also ask for additional assistance from any qualified Nurses, Doctors and/or EMT's. In the OP message it appears s/he was traveling aboard one of our flights.

Yep... I love you guys I (a he) was on CO1723 IAH-ONT. Your colleagues were great (as always) on that flight. (On a selfish note, after my trip home I will finally have enough miles to qualify for silver elite status)

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 3):
A) The Captain...
B) The Captain...
C) The Captain would land the plane at the closest airport...

Wow...It's even more clear-cut than I thought.

Quoting Airlinerfreak (Reply 11):
A question here, is the person who is ill held financially responsible for the diversion?

I'm curious about this, too, and would appreciate it if an authority on the subject could speak. I would imagine costs of diversion could, depending on circumstances, be tens of thousands of dollars. On one hand, I beleive it's common (at least in some areas of the US) for paramedics to bill for their services [but luckily, I have not needed paramedics [knock on wood] so I can't speak from first hand knowledge], so it would make sense to charge the pax for essentially the same service; on the other hand, if the pax knew that they were going to be billed, insisted that the flight not divert because they were 'feeling fine now', and later died the airline may be involved in a wrongful death suit, so they may just view diversions as a cost of doing business.

Also, for anyone curious, the ill pax did walk off the aircraft under his own power (though closely followed by paramedics) and was then brought down to the ambulance where (I assume) he was given a full checkup.

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 7684 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 3):
Anyways, this event I was wondering (a) what drives the decision to divert or continue to the original destination, (b) who makes that decision (I guess ultimately it's the captain's, but does the 'medical professional' have input?) (c) what would have happened had there not been anyone with a medical background on board?



Quoting EMBQA (Reply 3):

A) The Captain...
B) The Captain...
C) The Captain would land the plane at the closest airport...



Quoting Lincoln (Reply 16):
Wow...It's even more clear-cut than I thought.

Well, actually, no it's not. In reality (IMHO), it's:
A) What drives the decision is what's in the best medical interest of the passenger...
B) The Medlink doctor makes the decision to continue or divert (in concert with captain and dispatcher as mentioned above in reply #14)...
C) If no Medlink, and no doctor/nurses/EMTs aboard, the captain makes his/her own decision and that's usually to land at the nearest suitable airport.

In the years before Medlink, you'd be confronted by all sorts of medical situations that you had to deal with:

1/ PHX-AUS, over ELP captain calls up and says there's a 13 year old kid traveling by himself and he managaed to stick a marble in his ear and it was now causing him alot of pain. Captain wanted to know if we needed to land in ELP, or could he make a long shallow descent into AUS for a more gradual pressure change. My spouse at the time was an ICU nurse, so I called her and we had a 3-way call with an ER doc. Before a concensus could be reached the marble popped out on its own, and the situation solved itself.

2/ Enroute somewhere to somewhere else, 30 year old female complains of typical heart attack symptoms. Not the typical age patient for such a malady, but we divert, EMS meets flight, and pax (and her boyfriend) get off the aircraft. No room in the ambulance for boyfriend, so he catches a cab to hospital. In the ambulance, after boyfriend leaves in cab, and just before ambulance is to leave the airport, female patient announces she faked the whole thing to get away from her abusive boyfriend, gets up, and bails from ambulance. Poof, she's gone.


User currently offlineGrbld From Netherlands, joined Dec 2005, 353 posts, RR: 3
Reply 18, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 7604 times:

It is really a difficult subject, as we discovered over some hostile territory not too long ago. A passenger was passed out and had sympthoms that could've been a severe heart problem but could also be hypoerventilation. The airports around us were all place that you didn't want to land, let alone put someone in the hospital. The thing is that medical personnel (as passengers) on board was not willing to make a decision, let alone advise one. So either it was life threatening or not. In the end we flew on and the passenger was greeted by an ambulance, but improved his condition during the remainder of the flight (which, according to the medical personnel, still did not exclude a heart problem!).

I talked to some family members of mine who are also in the medical field about the chance that you're taking and they said that it's normal to allow for a 4% margin of error. So in fact, when someone complains about chest pains and you tell them to just wait it out for another day, it's more or less acceptable if 4% turns out to be a problem after all.

This shocked me, but it's understandable on the other hand. If you had to commit everyone with chest pains to the emergency room, 96% would go home again with nothing serious, but they would take up the staff's time and cost a lot of money (see your insurance premiums quadrouple if they have to perform scans and checks on everybody, let alone where they'd find the capacity and personnel) and in the end, some people who are in trouble die in the waiting room because the hospital is so backed up and cannot deal with the number of patients.

It's a raw deal, to know that in healthcare, you may be faced with a doctor's decision based upon a chance that things may be okay. And just as a comparison, where it is okay in healthcare to be wrong 4% of the time (that's one in 25), in the cockpit we train emergencies that on average may occur one in a billion times. Quite the difference, isn't it?

But it does put the diversion scenario into perspective. Should you divert any time, just to be safe? Perhaps not, doctors don't work that way either. But it remains difficult.

Grbld


User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21626 posts, RR: 55
Reply 19, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 7584 times:

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 17):
1/ PHX-AUS, over ELP captain calls up and says there's a 13 year old kid traveling by himself and he managaed to stick a marble in his ear and it was now causing him alot of pain. Captain wanted to know if we needed to land in ELP, or could he make a long shallow descent into AUS for a more gradual pressure change. My spouse at the time was an ICU nurse, so I called her and we had a 3-way call with an ER doc. Before a concensus could be reached the marble popped out on its own, and the situation solved itself.

 rotfl 

Oh, what kids do these days....

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineUltrapig From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 585 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 7396 times:
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Are pasengers for who a me is declared then blacklisted for that airline--if not balcklisted is there a list prepared for lets saymulti diversion people?

User currently offlineRobertS975 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 941 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 7142 times:
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Lufthansa was successfully sued by the family of a passenger who died aboard a trans-Atlantic flight when the flight crew ignored recommendations from medical folks on board to divert.

But care must be taken to divert to an airport that has proper facilities. Recall the Virgin 747 London-LAX that put down at Iritusk (?spelling) in the Canadian arctic for an onboard medical emergency. Successful landing but wingtip hit a building while taxiing. The whole planeload had to be transferred to smaller planes and flown out. Of course, the sick passenger was also airlifted out to a better facility. So in reality, the 747 landed at an airport that was a proper diversion point if it were on fire, but not suitable for a medical diversion.


User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13596 posts, RR: 61
Reply 22, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 7025 times:
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Quoting Go3Team (Reply 5):
As heartless as it may sound, has any airline ever tried to recoup the expenses incurred during a divert?

In former Eastern Air Lines CEO Col. Frank Borman's autobiography "Countdown," he recalled an incident where he and his wife were on an EA flight in First Class where a passenger got up, staggered into the aisle, and collapsed. He and the crew tended to the man's needs while they diverted and the customer was taken away by ambulance.

A few days later his secretary says there's a very irate man on the phone, threatening to sue. Turns out it's the SAME GUY - claiming that he was sleeping and that the crew mistook his sleeping for a medical problem and that he woke up in a strange hospital. Col. Borman didn't miss a beat and told him that he was on the same flight, and personally held an oxygen mask over the man's face while they made a costly emergency landing in a different city - and that EA was prepared to countersue for their costs!

The guy gulped and said, "You were on that flight?"

Borman replied, "I sure as hell was."

And the guy hung up.



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 6951 times:

Quoting EA CO AS (Reply 22):
The guy gulped and said, "You were on that flight?"

Borman replied, "I sure as hell was."

And the guy hung up.

Great story!

Quoting Go3Team (Reply 5):
As heartless as it may sound, has any airline ever tried to recoup the expenses incurred during a divert?

I see where BA is trying to fet $58,000 USD out of the boffing couple that forced their LHR-MBJ flight to divert to BDA, but, of course, that wasn't a medical diversion.

I don't know of any airline that has tried to re-coup the costs of a medical diversion, and as far as I'm concerned, such diversions (if for confirmed or truly suspected medical issues) are just the cost of doing business. If someone intentionally fakes it for other purposes (as I mentioned in an earlier post), that's a different story and an airline should go after them.

I would think that one of the downsides of an airline going after recompense after a diversion (one for a true/suspected medical problem) is that you run the great PR risk of looking live an evil corporate monster that's trying to take advantage of the poor helpless passenger. Pretty soon, the media starts writing stories to that effect, and before you know it, the general populace thinks that Airline-X is charging people to administer oxygen, or charging folks to use the defibrillator. Better to just quietly consider the diversion cost as an normal, yet unexpected cost.


User currently offlineLetsgetwet From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 609 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (8 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 6925 times:

Quoting Lincoln (Thread starter):
There was a gentleman on board who was a paramedic (coincidentally, we had been talking about that in the gate area prior to boarding), who went to the rear galley (738) and did his thing... From what one of the flight attendants was telling us, a defibrillator was involved, and there was quite a bit of interphone dinging and flight attendants running from front to rear and viceversa. The gentleman continued working in the back of the aircraft until just prior to landing.

Just a side note, if a medical professional such as an RN or even an EMT responds to such an emergency, that person has no choice but to stay with his patient until he is relieved by a higher medical authority. He can't just return to his seat because could be held liable for deserting his patient.


25 Firiko : I was once on a Turkish Airlines flight from LHR to Ist Just after take off one of the passenger's got up shouted for help and collapsed. The first th
26 MarkATL : I would think that the costs of diversions, Medlink, defibulators, sealed medical kits, etc. are a nominal fraction of what the liability expenses of
27 RIXrat : I thought that I posted a reply to this thread, but it seems to have vanished into the ether above us. I'll try to repeat what I said. I recently read
28 Lincoln : I'm not suprised by that at all, especially in the US, but... I thought that "Good Samaritan" laws in many states would protect off-duty medical prof
29 3201 : Yeah, but it's too easy to find 12 high-school-dropouts who can be convinced that *anything* is "grosly neglegiant" -- we have subjective laws and le
30 Letsgetwet : The "Good Samaritan Laws" will protect a lay person, but not a trained medical professional (off-duty or not)
31 RobertS975 : That's why any medical professional will recommend diversion... why would the professional want to keep responsibility for the situation when more lik
32 AsstChiefMark : Whenever I board a flight, I tell the lead FA that I'm an RN/medic. In case they need help, it could save time and avoid an announcement that would dr
33 Ken777 : I was on a BA HKG-LHR flight several years ago when a FA got rather sick and a local (HK) Dr cared for him. Four hours into the flight the decision wa
34 Debonair : Hi, very difficult... but I can give u some inside information in european aviation, it is very different... 1.some airlines have a list with "check-b
35 Post contains images TheGreatChecko : I'm thinking this may not be the smartest idea. 20 minutes to the airport, 5 minute taxi. That's at least 25 minutes if an IMMEDIATE diversion was ma
36 BA380 : IIRC, Cuba is famous for having one of the best health care systems in the world!!!!!
37 Don81603 : Man, talk about nerve! Does anyone know the final outcome of this? Sounds interesting.
38 LTBEWR : Two issues - although very rare - I would be concerned with as to a medical emergency would be where a fake situation is part of a hijacking/terror ac
39 GeorgiaAME : I've dealt with several medical emergencies, including one diversion. I made the decision to divert, and it was the captain who specifically asked a)
40 Post contains images Boeingfanyyz : I was reading something a while back that states that many carriers who offer non-stop service between continental US and Asia are to use the wine cel
41 Itsjustme : Seriously? Nitroglycerin is carried on a commercial aircraft? If that is true, the obvious question would be, is there always someone on board who is
42 ChiGB1973 : So can Aspirin and Tylenol if given to someone allergic. There is stuff in the medical kit that made me cringe to think someone untrained has assess t
43 Itsjustme : Yep and you're right, it's not a pretty sight. Actually, medics sometimes get a kick out of seeing the Docs (and nurses as well) sweat prior to being
44 ChiGB1973 : We had automatic B/P machines and that was part of the work sheet to be filled out prior to contacting MedLink. I wish I could find the list. It was
45 Mas777 : On my flight - British Airways was superb and I did get quite a few 'perks' on the remaining flight back to London. I second that 'scary as poop' rem
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