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Titanium & Security  
User currently offlineAvi8tir From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 409 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1409 times:
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I have been thinking about this for a while, and since I experienced it again today, I thought Id ask the question. I own a Breitling Aerospace. It is constructed of high grade titanium. I read years ago that titanium is anti-magnetic. So understanding that, I realized that I could wear it through security. so I tried it out. it worked. I have worn it through every time since without a hitch. 100+ times. its kind of funny sometimes because the person monitoring the detector will often point out to me that I am still wearing my watch in order to remind me that it will set off the machine. I just smile and walk through and I often see a look of disbelief on their face. this raises a question to me about the possiblities of other titanium made items making it through security. perhaps in larger amounts, it would set off the detector. any thoughts on this?


*Long live the Widget*
9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 1368 times:

Along with being very expensive titanium is also very hard to work with. In order to make anything using it you need skilled labor and specialized facilities. Nothing to lose sleep over.

User currently offlineAvi8tir From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 409 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1346 times:
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I would think that certain "organizations" would have the funds.


*Long live the Widget*
User currently offlineDALMD88 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2533 posts, RR: 14
Reply 3, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1329 times:

Let's see, I could steal a small piece from work, and I know I can sharpen it enough to cut myself. So I would think it is a problem.

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 4, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1320 times:
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Quoting DALMD88 (Reply 3):
Let's see, I could steal a small piece from work, and I know I can sharpen it enough to cut myself. So I would think it is a problem.



Well, it's a mistake to believe that commercial airliners can be sterilized, and that all weapons can be screened out.

The single most secure and heavily monitored environment...maximum security prisons...regularly have problems with weapons being created and smuggled in.

If you think think the TSA...or any airport security force...can achieve, or can be expected to achieve better results, you're fooling yourself.

All you can do is make your best effort to minimize the risk.




2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1298 times:

Quoting Avi8tir (Reply 2):
I would think that certain "organizations" would have the funds.

Why would these "organizations" want to spend the money on titanium when you can use other non-ferrous metals that are cheaper and easier to work with?


User currently offlineSinlock From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 1637 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1297 times:

Quoting LMP737 (Reply 1):
Along with being very expensive titanium is also very hard to work with. In order to make anything using it you need skilled labor and specialized facilities. Nothing to lose sleep over.

It's simpler than any of you think...............

NOW AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL EBAY!!!!!

http://search.ebay.com/search/search...&satitle=Titanium+knife&category0=

I'll feel a little safer when body scanners start showing up.



My Country can beat up your Country....
User currently offlineDeltaGator From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 6341 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1284 times:

Quoting Sinlock (Reply 6):
I'll feel a little safer when body scanners start showing up.

I'll feel safer when the US Government allows profiling and we start looking for the terrorist instead of lookign for the weapon and bothering nuns, old ladies, and kids at the security lines (unless of course they are the terrorists then kick the crap out of them.)



"If you can't delight in the misery of others then you don't deserve to be a college football fan."
User currently offlineJayinKitsap From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 769 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1266 times:

I heard on the news that at least one airline will not let an unaccompanied minor sit next to any man (I guess is they think they could be a pedophile). So it is OK to use profiling there but not to catch the bad guy boarding the plane?

Cops profile all the time: hot looking cars and junkers get pulled over more often. Why, because they have a high probability of violations. The minivan needs less scrutiny. Why can't the TSA.

Males in their 20's that look scruffy, have wild eyes, and raise suspicion should get more scrutiny. Grannines and older businessmen should get less but still some. Statistically balance your security to the threat instead of being PC.


User currently offlineCloudyapple From Hong Kong, joined exactly 9 years ago today! , 2454 posts, RR: 10
Reply 9, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1250 times:

I believe the security scanners can be adjusted to various sensitivties to detect different materials.

But hey - a plastic fork or a woman's handbag could be a weapon, should they be banned too? What about mobile phones? They can receive signals and trigger things planted onboard! Ban them! Or you can spend some time to invent a scanner to detect bad guys instead. Stop being ridiculous about security. Many tourists are put off by these over the top so-called "security arrangements". I am one.



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