Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Question About Concorde  
User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1741 times:

I know that the Concorde has been retired, but are Concordes still operational in any way?

The reason I ask is that I saw this photo:

http://www.airliners.net/open.file/986087/M/

The photo information says it was taken just a week or two ago.

Thanks in advance.

Also, to the Staff: I didn't know where to post this message, so I chose Civil Aviation. Sorry if it's misposted -- please feel free to redirect it to the correct one.

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDogfighter2111 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 1968 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1722 times:

hehe...

They are just lights in the engines. If that were real, you'd see Concorde shooting off into the sky.

All parts hat could be re-used would have been removed.

Thanks
Mike


User currently offlinePositiveClimb From Germany, joined Jun 2004, 214 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1715 times:

No, Concorde is on stationary display at CDG. You can see the mountings on the wheels. The afterburner glow is created by red lights which are installed in the engines, I suppose.

In my opinion the photographer just wanted to stress the 'ready to go' look with his remark... (and by the way... isn't she beautiful?! )


Best regards,
Fabian/PositiveClimb


Edit: Have to learn to type faster...

[Edited 2006-01-05 12:27:22]


Proud Airbus employee
User currently offlineCO7e7 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 2848 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1702 times:

Are you asking because of the after burn in the engines ???
In think they might be lights.




View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Bernard Charles


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © TZ Aviation



User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1669 times:

Thanks for the comments!  

I love the Concorde, and wish I could have flown in it. Perhaps one day, there'll be another SST, but for now, we civvies are stuck with subsonic.

Years from now, maybe there will be a "son of Concorde". Here's hoping.  

[Edit: I truly feel like an idiot. I just noticed that the Concorde in the photo was elevated on a couple of stands. I should have realized that it was a static display. In the immortal words of Homer Simpson: "D'Oh!"  Embarrassment )

[Edited 2006-01-05 12:53:04]

User currently offlineFlySSC From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 7401 posts, RR: 57
Reply 5, posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1623 times:

Quoting PositiveClimb (Reply 2):
The afterburner glow is created by red lights which are installed in the engines, I suppose.

Right.

This is what it looked like, for real :


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ryan Hemmings
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Sunbird Photos by Don Boyd



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Bernard Charles
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Tommy T



User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1599 times:

Quoting FlySSC (Reply 5):
This is what it looked like, for real :

Woo! Great photos!  Smile

Methinks Air France and BA should do a yearly flight for people who simply want the experience. (Yes, I know it's probably completely uneconomical and unreasonable, but there are things that are beyond price.  Wink )


User currently offlineGlom From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 2815 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 1517 times:

If it's flying, why is it on a pedastal?

[Edited 2006-01-05 16:41:43]

User currently offlineAirEuropeUK733 From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2004, 976 posts, RR: 11
Reply 8, posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 1508 times:

Quoting AerospaceFan (Reply 6):
Woo! Great photos!

Aren't they just - sadly missed. I was fortunate enough to travel on both G-BOAF and AG back in the early 90s - what a fantastic experience! Flying along the English Channel at 1,350 mph sipping champagne and eating lobster - them were they days.

Shame she'll never fly again  Sad

AE733



It's nice to fly with firends
User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13159 posts, RR: 78
Reply 9, posted (8 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 1436 times:

It is not possible to resume any kind of operations, the type certificate is withdrawn, the aircraft decommissioned (permanently), the support network 2 years gone and pretty impossible to bring back.

BA and AF did provide much lower cost trips, we at BA called them 'round the bays', as they originally went around the Bay Of Biscay.
These were the most common charters, AF were doing them until the end, BA did not post the 2001 re-launch, as they had become barely profitable, for BA that is, not the charter company!

In 1999, the last full year BA Concorde did a charter operation (which at best, provided just 9% of Concorde revenue), there were 36 LHR-LHR charters.
Including one on Christmas Day.
Including two (OAA and OAC), which chased the Aug 11th eclipse.

However, some were also operated from other UK airports, like MAN, BHX, LBA, EXT, FZO, MSE, even some abroad, such as from CDG.

Plenty of other types of charters too, but the basic, 90-100 min, 10 mins or so at Mach 2, BA9010C LHR-LHR, was the cheapest way to get on a supersonic flight.
Though rather a short flight, the BA9010C's, with 100 pax, but no baggage and a much lower fuel load, really got away fast, even by Concorde standards.

The first was in 1978, an early BA Concorde pilot was urged by his local pub to charter one for a pleasure trip.
From the early 80's these sort of charters steadily increased, good PR, easy to do, the aircraft being increasingly profitable on it's scheduled routes anyway.

But it's gone and not coming back, a new SST is at best decades away, it happens at all.
Whilst I feel sorry for those that wanted to, but missed flying Concorde, both operators did offer this more affordable way to experience it for many years.

I wanted to see a Saturn V launch from Kennedy Space Centre, but was way too young when the last one went, life is sometimes like that.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
A Question About Concorde Deals From LHR posted Sat Jun 7 2003 16:37:47 by EGGD
Question About Concorde Pilots posted Wed Nov 7 2001 20:31:01 by PolAir
Question About EMA posted Thu Dec 14 2006 05:11:38 by Pe@rson
Question About Antrak Air (Ghana) posted Wed Dec 6 2006 14:08:08 by ENU
Question About US Dividend Miles posted Tue Dec 5 2006 09:30:49 by QXatFAT
Question About Intl. Ops At PDX posted Mon Dec 4 2006 16:01:23 by Planenutz
A Question About Route Maps posted Wed Nov 29 2006 21:48:21 by LY777
Question About SIA 744 Vs 773ER Route Assigments posted Wed Nov 29 2006 18:59:58 by NA
Question About Steward's Uniform! posted Thu Nov 23 2006 18:31:55 by RootsAir
A Question About St Maarten Airport (SXM) posted Mon Nov 20 2006 21:00:40 by Aero145