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Iata Codes: Where Did HP And WN Come From?  
User currently offlineAirRyan From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2532 posts, RR: 5
Posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 8725 times:

Just wondering how they have got HP from America West and Southwest came up with WN? I know that SW was already taken but does the WN or HP stand or mean anything else?

39 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineNewark777 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 9348 posts, RR: 30
Reply 1, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 8719 times:

The story goes that WN stands for "We're Nuts," but that's just a rumor.

Harry



Why grab a Heine when you can grab a Busch?
User currently offlineTxAgKuwait From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 1803 posts, RR: 43
Reply 2, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 8671 times:

In fact, the "WN=We're Nuts" is nothing more than a rumor.

When Southwest started flying in 1971, its original two letter designator was OE. There waqs not much available...Seaboard World (as I recall) had SW tied up.

When something with a W came available, Lamar Muse (then Pres & CEO) said to grab it, and they did.


User currently offlineFCYTravis From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 1191 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 8557 times:

When a small startup dereg airline in Phoenix went looking to get off the ground, it found that another startup airline had gotten its operating certificate issued, and then promptly run out of cash. That airline was Hawaiian Pacific.

So the new airline's investors bought Hawaiian Pacific's operating certificate, and with it, the IATA letters HP.

America West Airlines was born.



USAir A321 service now departing for SFO with fuel stops in CAK, COS and RNO. Enjoy your flight.
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 8543 times:

Quoting TxAgKuwait (Reply 2):
In fact, the "WN=We're Nuts" is nothing more than a rumor.

I'll second that...  Wink


User currently offlineMandargb From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 195 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8437 times:

WN = "'W'e provideon only pea'N'uts" thats what I always thought.
BTW their stock ticker is "LUV" - Smile


User currently offlineDalb777 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2192 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8424 times:

How about B6 for Jet Blue and F9 for Frontier?


Geaux Tigers! Geaux Hornets! Geaux Saints! WHO DAT!!!
User currently offlineANother From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 8295 times:

Quoting Dalb777 (Reply 6):
How about B6 for Jet Blue and F9 for Frontier?

Normally new airlines are given a choice, from what is available. I guess JB and FR weren't available at the time.


User currently offlineN844AA From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1352 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 8285 times:

Here's something I've wondered about: it seems like there are more airlines than IATA codes.* How is that handled? Are duplicates issued, or do some airlines not receive an IATA code?

* I estimate there are at least 1350 airlines listed at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_airlines. But, there are only 1296 potential IATA codes (36 alphanumic characters * 36). I could be wrong about the number of airlines, but if anything, I'd imagine 1350 is an underestimation; I recall reading that 400 different airlines were created from the ashes of the Soviet Aeroflot alone.



New airplanes, new employees, low fares, all touchy-feely ... all of them are losers. -Gordon Bethune
User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 9, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 8265 times:

Quoting ANother (Reply 7):
I guess JB and FR weren't available at the time.

One reason is because Ryanair already got FR.  Wink

Quoting Newark777 (Reply 1):
The story goes that WN stands for "We're Nuts," but that's just a rumor.

 rotfl  rotfl  rotfl  rotfl 


User currently offlineBlsbls99 From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 345 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 8252 times:

I thought someone had told me when America West was chosing it's code that HP and one other two letter code wasn't used...one that began with V and ended with D...so they chose the HP code.
How long have the letter and number combination codes been around?



319 320 313 722 732 733 735 73G 738 739 742 752 763 772 CRJ D9S ERJ EMB L10 M88 M90 SF3 AT4
User currently offlineCPH757 From Denmark, joined Sep 2005, 684 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 8210 times:

Quoting N844AA (Reply 8):
* I estimate there are at least 1350 airlines listed at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_airlines. But, there are only 1296 potential IATA codes (36 alphanumic characters * 36). I could be wrong about the number of airlines, but if anything, I'd imagine 1350 is an underestimation; I recall reading that 400 different airlines were created from the ashes of the Soviet Aeroflot alone.

It seems that HU is used twice. For Hainan Airlines, and Antigua Paradise Airways. I once got at Hainan ticket confirmation with the Antigua name printed on it  Smile



Last flight: SAW-CPH on H9 on 02/11/09 - Next Flights: 23/12/09 CPH-AAL on QI, 30/12/09 CPH-LHR on SK, 19/01/10 CPH-CDG-
User currently offlineANother From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 8150 times:

Quoting N844AA (Reply 8):
How is that handled?

Not all airlines require a two letter code - for example non scheduled operators, they can use their three letter ICAO code. As of last June there were 792 codes assigned, 49 blocked (codes used by industry associations and codes such as I1 (letter i + number 1) leaving 355 'Available'.

Quoting CPH757 (Reply 11):
It seems that HU is used twice

There are 211 codes which are 'controlled duplicates'. The rules for these are quite complex - for example is usually pax with cargo, the two can't operate in the same area, etc. etc.


User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8416 posts, RR: 11
Reply 13, posted (8 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 8136 times:
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Quoting TxAgKuwait (Reply 2):
Seaboard World (as I recall) had SW tied up.

SW is Air Namibia. (From the old name of the country, South West Africa).



After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 8076 times:

Quoting Andz (Reply 13):
SW is Air Namibia. (From the old name of the country, South West Africa).

It may be now, but what TxAg was referring to was in the context of what was happening back in the late 1960s/early 1970s. Was Air Namibia in existence back then, or did they just get the code subsequent to Seaboard World going out of business?


User currently offlineBlooBirdie From Lesotho, joined Sep 2003, 250 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 8057 times:

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 14):
Was Air Namibia in existence back then

It was called Suid-Wes Lugdiens (Translates as South West Airservice).

Perhaps there was a duplicate in use?


User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 8021 times:

Quoting BlooBirdie (Reply 15):
It was called Suid-Wes Lugdiens (Translates as South West Airservice).

Did they have the "SW" code back in the late 1960s/early 1970s, or did Seaboard World (with Suid-Wes Lugdiens using something else)?


User currently offlineANother From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 7895 times:

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 16):
Did they have the "SW" code back in the late 1960s/early 1970s, or did Seaboard World (with Suid-Wes Lugdiens using something else)?

Well, according to this website it did have the code SW until it was absorbed by Flying Tigers in 1980. Also, it was known as Seaboard and Western Airlines until 1961. Amazing what a little googling will reveal.


User currently offlineMalaysia From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 3317 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 7876 times:

Quoting ANother (Reply 17):
Well, according to this website it did have the code SW until it was absorbed by Flying Tigers in 1980. Also, it was known as Seaboard and Western Airlines until 1961. Amazing what a little googling will reveal.

Such as Ozark used its self describing IATA code of OZ

but after TWA took them over, Asiana took OZ grrrrr



There Are Those Who Believe That There May Yet Be Other Airlines Who Even Now Fight To Survive Beyond The Heavens
User currently offlinePgtravel From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 446 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 7804 times:

Quoting Blsbls99 (Reply 10):
I thought someone had told me when America West was chosing it's code that HP and one other two letter code wasn't used...one that began with V and ended with D...so they chose the HP code.

This is the story I was told when I worked there. Of course, I was also told that HP stood for "Happy Passengers"! Corny? Oh yeah.


User currently offlineFlyCaledonian From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2050 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 7711 times:

Well British Caledonian used the code BR until it was taken over by BA. Now Eva Air uses the BR code.


Let's Go British Caledonian!
User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 7680 times:

Quoting Dalb777 (Reply 6):
How about B6 for Jet Blue and F9 for Frontier?

The two letter code used by the original Frontier wasn't available either, as a little start up out of MCO was using the FL code.


User currently offlineCoronado990 From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 1593 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 7653 times:

Take note: WN is Northwest backwards.


Uncle SAN at your service!
User currently offlineN844AA From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1352 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 7587 times:

Quoting ANother (Reply 12):
Not all airlines require a two letter code - for example non scheduled operators, they can use their three letter ICAO code. As of last June there were 792 codes assigned, 49 blocked (codes used by industry associations and codes such as I1 (letter i + number 1) leaving 355 'Available'.

Thanks for that helpful information. I appreciate it.



New airplanes, new employees, low fares, all touchy-feely ... all of them are losers. -Gordon Bethune
User currently offlineA319XFW From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 7562 times:

I prefer the 3-letter ICAO code, as you can (usually) tell which airline it is, for example:

EZY - easyJet
BAW - British Airways
DLH - Deutsche Lufthansa
UAL - United Airlines

And so on....


25 Post contains images N1120A : Given that they hired you, I would tend to agree with the WN = We're Nuts explanation JB is used by Helijet in Canada and FR is the well known Ryanai
26 Midex461 : I was told that HP stood for "Happy People". An even BIGGER joke!
27 Post contains images OPNLguy : Mais oui Josephine, I am as sane as you...
28 Post contains links and images A319XFW : That's why I said "I prefer" and not A.net... B6 = JBU HP = AWE WN = SWA AY = FIN SK = SAS From http://www.airlinecodes.co.uk/airlcodesearch.asp
29 Flyawa : HP began with on-board ticketing forcing many pax to "hold pee" until arrival. AW was held by Air Niger in the early 80s.
30 ScottieDog : EZS actually belongs to easyJet Switzerland - this airlines was originally TEA Basel AG and easyJet took a 40pc holding in it in 1998. This holding w
31 HoosierCFI : I had always heard and thought that WN stood for "Why Not?", in reference to the code SW already being taken
32 Devil505x : They don't exist anymore so why not get it now? Why did HP want to get HP so bad?
33 Post contains images JetBlueAtJFK : I don't know about that one but their new code us US! B6 was J6 when they first started off I believe because in old A.net posts when B6 started ever
34 ANother : As noted these are two separate companies (and AOCs). But the NEXT BIG THING in two letter codes will be driven by 'flight number exhaustion'. i.e. S
35 Cricket : Oh god, as if ticketing isn't bad enough already.
36 Knope2001 : Until the early 80's airlines were limited to two-letter codes (no numbers) and so startups from that era tended to get the best two-letter code they
37 Pgtravel : At last check, AW is now used by Dirgantara Air Services out of Indonesia and has been for quite some time. (Do they still fly?) Still, more than one
38 RobK : There are no need for 5 digits numbers. All the airlines have got to do is use alpha-numerical trip numbers, like several already do. AZA7C1 being a
39 N1120A : Yes, I know, but if you are figuring out an EasyJet flight, you could get confused The main reason any airline (or airport) doesn't change its code i
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