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Mechanic Sucked Into CO 737 Engine In El Paso  
User currently offlineRadiocheck From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 32 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 54493 times:

Making matters worse, there were passengers on the aircraft, some of whom witnessed the event. I can't even imagine seeing something like that.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/01/16/airplane.fatality/index.html

152 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 54311 times:

Wow. Talk about your worst nightmare coming true.

PLEASE be careful out there folks....rampers, mechanics, agents, fuelers. We all get so complacent out there day after day, and in reality, we're just as susceptible to this sort of thing as anyone else. We almost had a ramper die on Friday after he fell from a K-Loader at A300 cargo door height. Had to use the paddles to get him back, and he's not in great shape.

My thoughts and prayers go out to the family of that mechanic.


User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11581 posts, RR: 52
Reply 2, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 54304 times:

Holy crap!!!

That is so incredibly sad.  Sad



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User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4863 posts, RR: 25
Reply 3, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 54035 times:
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Wow...

Working on the ramp, I always wonder how often this kind of thing happens. It is very easy to get too comfortable around those engines. I've seen mechanics crouching under engines during a test-run and it is quite a sight to see them so close.

I have always wondered. Can a 737 engine at idle fully suck a person into an engine? For some reason they just do not appear to be moving fast enough to create enough suction for that...which is another reason it is so easy to get to comfy with them. Not that I'm going to dare stand right in front of an idle engine, but it's just that these accidents seem to always occur during engine run-ups where the engines are running at a higher than idle power setting. Just something I have wondered...



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineDtwclipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 53973 times:

So, what is unclear to me, is was this being done at the gate?

The article is a little mis-leading.


"Continental Airlines Flight 1515 was preparing to take off for Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston when "a maintenance-related engine run-up of the right-hand engine".


Preparing for take off or preparing for departure from the gate?


User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 5, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 53925 times:

Damn, I wouldn't want to be in their shoes after having seeing this. This is absolutely horrifying. My sympathies are with the family of the victim and with the passengers who unfortunately had to see this.

Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 1):
PLEASE be careful out there folks....rampers, mechanics, agents, fuelers.

I couldn't agree more.


User currently offlineDeltaGator From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 6341 posts, RR: 13
Reply 6, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 53913 times:

Quoting Dtwclipper (Reply 4):
"Continental Airlines Flight 1515 was preparing to take off for Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston when "a maintenance-related engine run-up of the right-hand engine".

Probably a poorly written article by someone who doesn't understand aviation or its terms completely. I believe what was happening was the mechanics were working on the engine as the passengers were boarding. They then did a run-up of the engine, although not at full power, and that is when he got sucked into the engine.



"If you can't delight in the misery of others then you don't deserve to be a college football fan."
User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4863 posts, RR: 25
Reply 7, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 53850 times:
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It apparently happened at the gate. It is common for engines to be run at the gate prior to a flight if some sort of inspection is necessary. Reports still seem a bit unclear as to whether this was a mechanic or a ramper of some kind. If it was a ramper, another possibility would be that this happened during an airstart. Disconnecting the hose sure gets that adrenaline pumping.

[Edited 2006-01-16 23:52:52]


ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineMaverickM11 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 17828 posts, RR: 46
Reply 8, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 53683 times:

Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 1):
We all get so complacent

I just can't fathom getting to that point; I just about wet myself every time I had to chock a running B1900D or DHC-8, especially when it was icy out!



E pur si muove -Galileo
User currently offlineGoose From Canada, joined Aug 2003, 1840 posts, RR: 15
Reply 9, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 53661 times:

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 7):
It apparently happened at the gate. It is common for engines to be run at the gate prior to a flight if some sort of inspection is necessary. Reports still seem a bit unclear as to whether this was a mechanic or a ramper of some kind. If it was a ramper, another possibility would be that this happened during an airstart. Disconnecting the hose is quite exhilarating.

Procedure at every airline I've worked is that, during an air start, the air start unit is on the #2 side and the #1 engine is started, after the gate is pulled back. The hose coupling on a 737 is underneath the aircraft and slightly on the #2 side.

Getting sucked in to the running angine during an airstart under such procedures are nearly impossible - unless the guy decides to go under the aircraft to the #1 side. This, of course, isn't safe nor smart.

I've disconnected the hose of an airstart hundreds of times. I can hardly describe it as "exhilarating."



"Talk to me, Goose..."
User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13767 posts, RR: 61
Reply 10, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 53655 times:
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When working for CO in PHX many moons ago, I saw "Friends Don't Let Friends Become FOD" signage in OPS... sad that such things can and do happen.  Sad


"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4863 posts, RR: 25
Reply 11, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 53581 times:
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Quoting Goose (Reply 9):
Procedure at every airline I've worked is that, during an air start, the air start unit is on the #2 side and the #1 engine is started, after the gate is pulled back. The hose coupling on a 737 is underneath the aircraft and slightly on the #2 side.

I'm asking for another WN safety debate here, but at WN both engines are typically running before the hose is disconnected. I have done a couple where they gave us the OK to disconnect after the #1 engine was started, but typically, they wait until both are started. Proper procedure for us is to keep your right shoulder along the fuselage as you walk along the aircraft to disconnect the hose and then do the same with your left shoulder on the way back.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineSeptember11 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 3623 posts, RR: 21
Reply 12, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 53511 times:

Heartbreaking news.

Quote from article: the person killed was a mechanic who worked for one of the airline's suppliers.

[Edited 2006-01-17 00:18:06]


Airliners.net of the Future
User currently offlineDash8tech From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 732 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 53495 times:

Hard to say why or how it happened, but tragic nonetheless....

...even if there is three threads about it now!


User currently offlineMiCorazonAzul From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 53348 times:

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 11):

I'm asking for another WN safety debate here, but at WN both engines are typically running before the hose is disconnected. I have done a couple where they gave us the OK to disconnect after the #1 engine was started, but typically, they wait until both are started. Proper procedure for us is to keep your right shoulder along the fuselage as you walk along the aircraft to disconnect the hose and then do the same with your left shoulder on the way back.

That doesn't seem very safe if you ask me.

Procedure at Jetblue is to start #2 engine since the connection for the airstart hose is closer to engine #1. Once #2 is started, hose is disconnected and the plane is PUSHBACKED with only ONE engine running. Normal pushback procedure is followed and then #1 engine is started.

As for this terrible accident, it is a sad tragedy indeed. When I was in training, the instructor emphasized the danger of being sucked into an engine NUMEROUS times....it really freaked me out. The way I see it is, NEVER take anything you do lightly on the ramp. Regardless of whether you are a new hire or 10 years on the ramp, you MUST be careful. The ramp is a very dangerous place......

[Edited 2006-01-17 00:26:37]

User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4863 posts, RR: 25
Reply 15, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 53310 times:
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Quoting MiCorazonAzul (Reply 14):
That doesn't seem very safe if you ask me.

Yeah, well all I can say at this point is, I only do what I'm taught.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineDash8tech From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 732 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 53216 times:

Silver, have they had any incidents? If not, it seems like a safe enough practice. If you have to do it that way, it's harder to be complacent than if there's nothing other than "be careful" to guide you.

Talk about tricky situations...walking around the flight deck of an aircraft carrier, give that a try! I worked nights too, with the idea that if you can't see it, it won't scare you!


User currently offlineNonrevman From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1302 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 52556 times:

I remember the safety training we had when I first started on the ramp. There was a video about this very topic--being ingested into an engine. Hopefully very few people saw the actual event, because it is something that one will remember for a long time--it is quite graphic. We were told that the 737 in particular was the most dangerous of the airliners because the engines are very close to the ground and are on the same level as someone walking around the tarmac. Most of the other jets had the engines somewhat higher off the ground or they were mounted at the tail section (727 or MD-80). That is a terrible way to die, and my heart goes out to this guy's family and friends. As for the training the airlines give on safety, it is one of the most valuable things about the job--even more than the flight benefits.

User currently offlinePlanespotting From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3541 posts, RR: 5
Reply 18, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 52059 times:

Quoting DeltaGator (Reply 6):
Probably a poorly written article by someone who doesn't understand aviation or its terms completely. I believe what was happening was the mechanics were working on the engine as the passengers were boarding. They then did a run-up of the engine, although not at full power, and that is when he got sucked into the engine.

i hate to get picky here, but the article is not written poorly. To the common folk, preparing for take-off could mean anything from doing preflight checks outside of the airplane before pushback to taxiing the airplane to the runway.

In any case, this is a very sad event. I was at ELP a little over a year ago and I sat in the Continental gates inside the terminal to spot...so tragic



Do you like movies about gladiators?
User currently offlineHPLASOps From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 51975 times:

Quoting Goose (Reply 9):
Procedure at every airline I've worked is that, during an air start, the air start unit is on the #2 side and the #1 engine is started, after the gate is pulled back. The hose coupling on a 737 is underneath the aircraft and slightly on the #2 side.

It could be different depending on the aircraft (many times I've seen the airstart engine on the #1 side while starting #2) but as long as you're starting the engine opposide the side where the cart is, it's all okay.


User currently offlineType-Rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 51611 times:

"Continental is coordinating assistance for passengers who need help dealing with this tragedy," Kellner said"

I would assume this is for those who actually witnessed the event. And I imagine witnessing that would be a life changing event. Sympathies to the guy and his family....

BTW, I thought that Larry had moved on over a year ago....


User currently offlineFlybynight From Norway, joined Jul 2003, 1031 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 51355 times:

How much thrust would have to be produced to suck in a human? It seems the plane must have been revving unless the poor guy was literally right in front of the engine. Horrible.


Heia Norge!
User currently offlineImperialEagle From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2630 posts, RR: 22
Reply 22, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 51318 times:

Sad to hear of this tragedy. I recall back in the mid-sixties the folks at the old cargo area on the northeast side of ATL were re-positioning an Airlift DC-7CF-------with the front cargo door still open. An unsecured tractor wheel rolled out right into #2 prop and was promptly flung right into the poor guy directing the re-positioning. Dead on the spot--- traumatizing both victim and co-workers I'm sure.

That was a real problem in the days of the old "windmills" with all those blades whirling -------seems like news was always drifting around about some luckless person who ended up being chopped.

Yeah, the ramp can be a very dangerous place!
Please be safe! You are worth it!



"If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough!"
User currently offlineBh From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 525 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 51268 times:

I'm in 737 FAM class right now and this really helps reiterate what the instructors have been saying about the inlet and exhaust safety area's. This could happen to anyone, all its takes is one freak thing to happen to set things the wrong way.

Deepest sympathy to the family and everyone be careful out there.


User currently offlineAirTran737 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3708 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (8 years 11 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 51223 times:
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My question is, did the flight go out on time?

Seriously though, this is a completely avoidable accident and when the investigation is complete the responsibility will most likely fall upon this mechanic. This accident once again proves that common sense must be used and attention must be paid at all times on the flight line. I'm glad to see that CO is doing everything that they can to help out the employees and passengers who witnessed this.



Nice Trip Report!!! Great Pics, thanks for posting!!!! B747Forever
25 Hmmmm... : When I worked for an airline in 1988, I was warned of the 737 engine menace. I can't believe this type of thing is still happening.
26 Amazonphil : No...plane now has a scheduled engine change and aircraft out of service. Pax were put on another plane. amazonphil
27 Rdwelch : I totally agree. Regardless of fault and circumstance, I have a heavy heart for the family. I impress upon my students and colleagues to no small deg
28 Post contains links and images Desh : My sympathies to all those involved - the mechanic - the family and the passengers who has to see it happen .... I cant help but ask the question - es
29 CO7e7 : Very sad indeed.. RIP to the CO employee My thought and prayers to his friends and family.
30 Post contains links and images Silver1SWA : Was that a serious question?? The flight was probably delayed in the first place due to the need for a run-up inspection. And a small bird being inge
31 Wjcandee : Well, it's a crime scene, so I would assume that the aircraft is impounded until the police, medical examiner, NTSB, OSHA, FAA, etc. are satisfied th
32 Rdwelch : Silver, great photo! The job of a MX is hours of boredom with the spike of what you see in the pic. Thnx, Gus.
33 FlyHoss : Crime scene? No. Accident scene? Yes. So the aircraft will be held until the NTSB is done investigating. Reported to NOT be a CO employee, but an "ou
34 Jumpseatflyer : Very sad indeed. Being a ramp worker, I always wonder how many people are killed by propellers, but it has never crossed my mind with concern to jet e
35 AirRyan : Interesting pic there of the mech underneath a running CFM-56 - when I was in the Marines and worked on helicopters we never wore any head gear onto t
36 IAHERJ : I would venture to guess that this mechanic was not wearing the required harness that would have prevented this under most conditions. I heard that th
37 EMBQA : A crime scene..? What crime was commited..? I'm not really sure if the NTSB would get involved in an accident like this, but I do see in there data b
38 TPASXM787 : Wow dude thanks for the nitpick when we're discussing someone that was killed. It made the thread so much better. I especially like the caps on to em
39 Boeingfever777 : I have questions: 1.) Does the engine not auto-shut down when a foreign object hit it? 2.) Article states: "He said the incident occurred during a mai
40 Silver1SWA : It depends. I've seen it many times for various reasons.
41 Type-Rated : The NTSB will sure as hell get involved in this one as the incident resulted in a loss of life and damage to an aircraft while operating a flight as a
42 PurdueAv2003 : 1.) A: No. If a plane flies through a flock of birds on take-off, affecting both engines, would you want the engines to auto-shut down? Absolutely no
43 FlyHoss : Yes, it is relevant. If you're family or friend of a CO mechanic, it's very relevant. Did you bother to read all of my reply?
44 Post contains images FXramper : Man I'm sorry to read about this. Can't imagine standing there on the ramp and watching one of my mates get sucked into an engine...
45 Post contains images Wjcandee : Yeah, yeah. I used that argument in a case once: "I object to them calling it a crime scene because no crime was committed; the shooting was ruled ju
46 Post contains images Bruce : A person can't get FULLY sucked in, right? I mean, there are the fan blades there. So you'd get pulled up against them? If so, there is very little sp
47 MX757 : Horrible! Just horrible! My prayers go out to the family and friends of this mechanic and to all the people that had to witness such a horrific event.
48 OPNLguy : Many years ago, we had a 737-300 coming into a gate under its own power, and 15-20 feet out, the brakes failed. The crew went into reverse thrust, bu
49 Post contains links KELPkid : The word from the ELP media: http://www.kvia.com/Global/story.asp?S=4368085 You could also try http://www.elpasotimes.com tomorrow morning, I'm sure t
50 Wjcandee : Years ago, I had a friend who was a senior maint guy at the old ML. He liked to tell war stories, which I enjoyed. One of the things that he discusse
51 OPNLguy : Some more info... Reportedly, the mechanic actually worked for this outfit: Julie's Aircraft Service, Inc. El Paso International Airport 6805 Boeing D
52 Post contains links Wjcandee : Or now... http://edit.elpasotimes.gannettonlin...e?AID=/20060116/NEWS/60116003/1001 Although this doesn't say much, they also say that they'll have m
53 Wjcandee : That's a truly wonderful idea. Although that takes more effort than simply tapping at a keyboard, it isn't that big of a deal to get a card and a sta
54 AirWillie6475 : No kidding, you think he might have been conscious halfway through the engine? I have seen test videos of 15 pound birds going through a jet engine t
55 EridanMan : *edit* prudence suggested my figures were unecessary... except to say that... unfortunately, yes, they probably would. But for what its worth, my kno
56 KELPkid : Wow, Julie's used to work on my late flight instructor's 172. Cutter Beechcraft used to take care of most of the turbine/turbojet aircraft on the fie
57 OPNLguy : I read a post on another board that said this is indeed what happened. A big difference between the JT8D-series of engines and the CFM-56 family is t
58 Wjcandee : That's a good point. The explanation to me was of course based in part on the existence of those vanes, as was the discussion of some stuff that happ
59 Markabcan : My thoughts and prayers go out to the family, friends and loved ones of the poor mechanic involved! A truly tragic accident and may his life always be
60 SparkingWave : There was a report that I read once where passengers who fell out of Pan Am 103's fuselage when it broke apart in midair were also sucked into and "ea
61 HAWK21M : Reffered to as Inlet Guide Vanes. The Ramp is a Dangerous place.One has to be Alert at all times & aware of the surroundings. When we carry out a Grd
62 Post contains images MxCtrlr : Its a tragedy but it illustrates the point that the tarmac is a dangerous place - even when you are paying full attention. When you lose your focus, i
63 Post contains links and images MX757 : In case any of you were wondering which CO aircraft it was: View Large View MediumPhoto © Tim Perkins Once again what terrible tragedy.
64 AerospaceFan : My deepest condolences to all affected by this tragic loss!
65 Post contains images Scarebus03 : As a fellow mech. my heart goes out to all affected by this terrible tragedy. For those of you who don't know the cfm56 equipped 737 is the most dange
66 Post contains images Silver1SWA : Now I'm scared to disconnect another airstart. I think from now on, I will request to be on the headset instead.
67 AerospaceFan : I wonder if there can be a tether system that might be explored as a safety measure. For example, during any test at which there is any risk of ingest
68 PeachAir : Not very often. It happens more with people walking in to propeller driven aircraft. Also - the smaller the intake, the greater the suction. The 737-
69 Wjcandee : For what it's worth, the El Paso paper really doesn't have much new in its article this morning. The NY Times seems to quote an NTSB official as sayin
70 OPNLguy : I now have the name of the deceased, but I won't post it until I see it in the media for the same reasons. He did contract MX for us in ELP as well,
71 Devil505x : I felt the same way! I know many times when we were deicing DHC-8s they would keep an engine or both running to save time. I hated getting in the dei
72 Hmmmm... : There are safety procedures in place to prevent this type of accident. So somebody failed to follow precedure. Perhaps 737s should have several thin b
73 Scarebus03 : How on earth is that possible? The -500 is only 1ft longer than the -200, the CFM is considerably more powerful than the JT8D, has an intake 3 times
74 CLE757 : That is very unsafe, at CO we NEVER start the number 2 engine with a air-start hooked up...only RJ's start the number 2 engine!
75 Aukahkay : Why was the #2 engine being run-up while the plane was at the gate with a full passenger load preparing to depart? I thought that engine run-ups shoul
76 Post contains links OyKIE : http://www.elpasotimes.com/apps/pbcs...?AID=/20060117/NEWS/601170325/1001 Here are some additional information on this tragic accident. My greatest sy
77 Post contains images Wukka : Ugh... I was on that bird out of IAH over the Christmas holiday. Poor guy. Bruce, perhaps you're thinking about a fan blowing air out the front of it?
78 Hiflyer : I agree...pulling 70% on a gate is normally not permitted on most AOA's that I have been at domestically in the states.
79 Dash8tech : For my airline too, really sad. I didn't want to mention the specifics of the incident when I started the original 'aircraft incident in El Paso' thr
80 UAXDXer : Keep in mind the plane was parked at a hard stand and not at an actual jetway.
81 Stretch : A grim and serious reminder to all that work on the ramp. My heart goes out to the family, friends, and co-workers of this man. RIP. Even with your he
82 Litz : I think I remember this also happening last year, or the year before, in Russia, or elsewhere in eastern europe, also with a 737. This is the critica
83 BWI757 : Do you have a picture/description for us non-rampers? Where would such a harness be hooked to? Many Thanks! BWI757
84 Rdwelch : The card from each one of us (or a many as we can) is a great idea. I've learned in my short time with A.net that we are a family, albeit a disfuncti
85 Post contains images AirEMS : My thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends and co-workers... Please be careful everyone although I love A.net I would rather not have any a.
86 PeachAir : Exactly my point the B737-200 (at idle) beacuse of the smaller intake, has greater suction than the -500 at idle. This was covered extensively in our
87 Post contains images OPNLguy : Yes, it did... 14 JUL 2004 Man sucked into jet engine A Russian aircraft maintenance engineer died at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport after he was suck
88 Post contains images 777DAD : This is for all involved truely tragic. I'm not an expert by any means when it comes to flying or it's logistics. What I learn, I learn on A-Net and r
89 Post contains links and images OPNLguy : In case anyone is wondering what the inlet guide vanes on a JT8D look like, check out the large version of this photo: View Large View MediumPhoto ©
90 MD11Engineer : I've never seen such a harness, unless at some select and well equiped heavy MX facilities. Most stations don't have them. I have worked quite a few
91 ALB2ATL : Pardon me for saying this, but I think this idea is quite ridiculous. Unless you know the deceased or are a friend of the family, sending a sympathy
92 Wjcandee : And all those flowers outside of the Buckingham Palace when Diana died were what? Or those people who sent flowers, burned candles, and paid for the
93 Type-Rated : I would have to agree with ALB2ATL on this one. Let's remember that Princess Diana was a public figure beloved my many people in the world. This was a
94 OPNLguy : No apologies necessary... If sending a card seems ridiculous/creepy to you, then by all means don't send one yourself. I made the original suggestion
95 GOCAPS16 : Agreed! Every mechanics worse nightmare but it's preventable with the correct training and Operational Risk Management. Use it. My condolences to his
96 MissedApproach : I remember reading an old RCAF Flight Safety article. The guy was...I dunno, removing gear pins or something, on a Starfighter. He wasn't too worried
97 MD80fanatic : How far does the danger zone extend from the sides of the intake? If there was only a way to disengage the fan assembly from the engine core...this wo
98 Junction : I think I remember from ramp training several years ago that once you can actually see the white spiral arrow spinning in the center of the engine tha
99 Post contains images AndrewUber : At my company, we are doing CFM safety training today due to this incident. As a rule of thumb, a CFM engine is extremely dangerous until you can hear
100 Post contains links OPNLguy : http://www.faa.gov/data_statistics/a...reliminary_data/media/D_0117_N.txt
101 Wjcandee : I don't disagree with that. [And I probably sounded a little snippier than I should have.] But that's why I also mentioned the little girl here in Ne
102 Jeffry747 : Just my little piece of advice to all the ramp guys out there: If the aircraft's red beacon lights are flashing, then play it safe and and DO NOT go n
103 Gigneil : This is where the horror begins for real... can you imagine being the Mx tech that changes that engine, or then overhauls it later? Ghastly. I can't
104 Tom in NO : I can't anser your question specifically, but I can say that.....on some of our gates here at MSY (WN's IIRC without actually going outside to look),
105 Wukka : Does this make sense to any A&P mechs out there? Is there a way to run a jet engine without the first-stage compressors feeding the core? If the fan
106 Post contains links OPNLguy : Name has been released... http://www.airliners.net/discussions...eneral_aviation/read.main/2554528/
107 MD80fanatic : I think the fan is directly attached to the N2 spool (turbine exhaust)....which is why I was wondering if the fan blade disc could be hydraulically mo
108 Wukka : Ahhh... I think I get what you're saying, but from what I understand, the engine would no longer work. N2 is the core that actually fires up the inje
109 5T6 : A very tough couple of days for us in the ELP area. Don was a very well respected A&P. I never had the honor of meeting him in person, but his signatu
110 EMBQA : The fan is physically connected to the core engine so there is no way to 'disconnect it'. Also, the fan provides nearly 80% of the thrust of the engi
111 Silver1SWA : Not sure if this is standard on all engines, but at least on WN engines, there is a small diagram on the side cowling that illustrates the danger zon
112 Fumanchewd : Noone does engine runups in hangars. That would be the most dangerous place in the world to do them, not to mention the problem of jetblast/propwash.
113 5T6 : A runup at idle? How do you do that? DUH? Sorry...just trying to keep everyone's eye on the ball that a guy's life was lost here for whatever reason,
114 Post contains images AAtakeMeAway : I thought they were boarding at the time of the incident.
115 Fumanchewd : Good job, I'm sure the guy's wife and family are desperately looking for condolences from absolute stranger's on a.net.. Yes, mechanics do it all of
116 Prinair : I work at ELP and let me just say the overall mood yesterday and today has been very somber. Don was a very nice person and very well known mechanic.
117 Post contains images FXramper : We had to watch a safety video at work tonight to remind of us what is required when working on the ramp around the a/c. Also, was told anyone not wea
118 Post contains links CCA : There is some more info here including some pictures of the aircraft involved. http://www.clear-and-a-million.com/v...c.php?p=15239&highlight=paso#152
119 Wjcandee : Talk about immature posts on that other web site. Really callous and childish, and it claims that it is the website of "professional" pilots. Right. T
120 Teresa : My husband and I recently found this page. Donald Buchanan, who very tragically lost his life on Monday is my Father in law. My husband Wade and mysel
121 Wjcandee : Teresa, you and your family are most definitely in our prayers. Although I didn't know him, I have thought of your father-in-law many times in the pas
122 Dl_mech : Our hearts all go out to you and your family, Teresa. From the way people have described Donald, it sounds like he was a real team player and someone
123 AvFan4ever : The low pressure spool and the high pressure spool rotate independently from each other. The low pressure spool includes the fan, low pressure compre
124 777WT : 13-15 feet radius at idle power from the intake area. I understand about your idea but clutches for high powered application would add cost, be heavy
125 Post contains links OPNLguy : Some more info... http://www.elpasotimes.com/apps/pbcs...?AID=/20060118/NEWS/601180320/1001
126 ContnlEliteCMH : If you've never witnessed a fatal accident, you don't imagine it skews your viewpoint on life; you experience it firsthand. About six years ago I wit
127 American 767 : That's right. There is a safety sign about this on the CFM engine cowling of the aircraft. If you fly on a 737 (unless it's a 100 or 200 Series but t
128 AKelley728 : Dear Buchanans: My heart goes out to you and your family. You have my utmost sympathy in this tragic loss. You are in my prayers!
129 AKelley728 : You're thinking of Gordon Bethune, who retired from CO at the end of 2004. Larry Kellner took over from Larry. I heard the same thing happened with U
130 StuckinMAF : I think it would be a nice gesture for everyone to add Teresa to their RU list. She paid and signed up specifically to write this thank-you note as t
131 AKelley728 : That's a great idea, I'm doing it now...
132 Rdwelch : Done. May God bless Teresa and Wade and their families. Gus
133 American 767 : I just added her to my respected user's list. Ben Soriano
134 Nisson : *my sympathies and deepest condolences for your loss* For all of us who work on the ramp and near engines " lets be careful and safe at all times".
135 Silver1SWA : Yesterday was my first day of work since the accident in ELP. I had been off since Sunday. I realized today how much that accident affected me. I seem
136 Wjcandee : I'm a little intrigued that your employer hasn't rolled out some extra briefings, offering of counseling, etc. A lot of ramp training is done by coll
137 Post contains images OPNLguy : How do you know that they didn't? Ground Ops Training had a memo out 2 days later on the 18th...
138 Post contains links OyKIE : Can anyone tell me how to post pictures on airliners.net? http://www.airliners.net/open.file/992126/L/ Here you have an engine running with a mechanic
139 OPNLguy : photoid:992126 and put as < > at the respective ends... The F/O's side would have been the better side to use...
140 AeroVodochody : May he rest in peace, this is terrible news.
141 Post contains links and images OyKIE : View Large View MediumPhoto © Piotr Marek (EPGD Spotters) Thank you OPNLguy. I would have felt much more safe at the other side of the plane. I h
142 Post contains links OPNLguy : Anytime... That and lots of other info can be found here: http://www.airliners.net/discussions/help.main?open=new (It's the small link at the bottom
143 Wjcandee : Poor phrasing on my part. My point being that Silver, at least, was still apprehensive. I think that lots of folks at lots of airlines will be so, an
144 AR385 : I do not believe in accidents. To me, they are a chain of events that leads to a conclusion, in this case, fatal. It is imperative to identify the lin
145 OPNLguy : Some updated info... Plane accident victim service to be Jan. 28 Times staff report Saturday, January 21, 2006 Family and friends of Donald Gene Bucha
146 Rdwelch : OP, thanks for all the information. Your'e a Mensch. Gus
147 MX757 : Actually he is well out of the ingestion hazard range. The range in front of a running engine (737NG/CFM56-7) is 14ft/4.2M. The picture is a little d
148 Silver1SWA : Yeah, there is a memo posted in our breakroom. It just reminds us of proper safety procedures. I'm fine. It's just now I understand a little better t
149 BAW716 : When any airline employee dies, we all mourn. When they die needlessly, we ask the question why? Working on the ramp is dangerous business. The chance
150 IAHcsr : The NTSB is finished with the aircraft ... It was ferried ELPIAH Sunday night, and will be back in service Monday. I will always remember Mr. Buchanan
151 AKelley728 : I think that's a great idea. However, has CO ever named its aircraft?
152 OPNLguy : If ever there was a tightrope to walk, this would be it. On one hand, doing something to honor his memory would be a nice gesture (with the family's
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