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How Is An Aircraft's Safety Tested?  
User currently offlineFlyingRev From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (8 years 8 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2480 times:

I am band new to the site and this is my first post. I am a pastor, flying is my hobby; my goal is to someday be a missionary pilot. Excuse me if I am not as knowledgeable as you, the experts. I am just honored to be a part of the site! I have searched the topics and have not found this question.

Here it is: I fly quite a bit. I love aircraft, commercial history and the like. I have read forums in the past as a guest about how old NW DC-9s are. B/C of that I try to avoid NW like a plague! Is the fleet safe? We have seen other A/C of that age retired from commercial service. As planes ages, what about the stress and possibility of fatigue to the aircraft itself? How much more life can be left in the good Ol’ work horses? Thanks, I am honored to be here with you!
 Smile

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12250 posts, RR: 35
Reply 1, posted (8 years 8 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2451 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

If you'd read the countless DC9 threads, you'd see that they are perfectly safe. They go thru strict maintenance procedures, and thus are just as safe as any newer plane.


911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineFlyingRev From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (8 years 8 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2430 times:

KaiGywer:

Ah Yes...But How do we go about testing things like:

Metal fatigue...cracks in the wings...These planes have been in the air for over 30 years in some cases. I used to fly TW every month when she was still in the air. The date on one of her -30s was over 28 years of age and that was 10 years ago! When does the point in time come when someone says enough is enough, its time to move on?

ARE THERE ANY OTHER US LEGACY STILL USING THESE OLD DC-9s?

[Edited 2006-01-18 14:34:51]

User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12250 posts, RR: 35
Reply 3, posted (8 years 8 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2381 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting FlyingRev (Reply 2):
Ah Yes...But How do we go about testing things like:

Metal fatigue...cracks in the wings...These planes have been in the air for over 30 years in some cases. I used to fly TW every month when she was still in the air. The date on one of her -30s was over 28 years of age and that was 10 years ago! When does the point in time come when someone says enough is enough, its time to move on?

ARE THERE ANY OTHER US LEGACY STILL USING THESE OLD DC-9s?

Several ways. X-ray, Eddy Current, ultrasound, and other NDT methods.

No, nobody else uses DC9s in the US.



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineGoaliemn From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 463 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (8 years 8 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2374 times:

Quoting FlyingRev (Reply 2):
Metal fatigue...cracks in the wings...These planes have been in the air for over 30 years in some cases.

They get taken apart and inspected on a regular basis. They remove the interiors and parts of the exterior to do inspections of the airframe itself.

Quoting FlyingRev (Reply 2):
When does the point in time come when someone says enough is enough, its time to move on?

Planes are rated for X number of compression/decompression cycles. The DC-9s in service haven't hit this number, and they do get their regular inspections.


User currently offlineBoeing757/767 From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 2282 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (8 years 8 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2340 times:

Also please keep in mind that more than half of its domestic fleet is comprised of A320s, A319s, 752s and 753s -- much newer.


Free-thinking, left-leaning secularist
User currently offlineBennett123 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 7605 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (8 years 8 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2254 times:

http://aviation-safety.net/database/...&page=1&field=Operatorkey&var=5561

This may be of interest to you.


User currently offlineFLyingRev From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 8 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2161 times:

Thank you all very much! I have a lot to learn. You have been a big help! Honored to be with you! Happy flying!

FlyingRev....


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 8, posted (8 years 8 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2110 times:

Quoting FlyingRev (Thread starter):
what about the stress and possibility of fatigue to the aircraft itself

Maintenance checks Hard Time,On Condition,Condition Monitoring are carried out on Aircraft.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlinePurdueAv2003 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 251 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (8 years 8 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 2077 times:

Another thing to remember is that the older birds were built with a more robust airframe than modern jetliners. In turn, they are rated for more cycles and have a longer life span. The down side was that these older planes weigh more. Over the years, engineers have worked to strike an economic balance between a/c life limits vs strength of the airframe. Saving money now with a lighter airframe balances out the cost of having to scrap the airframe at an earlier age. The older planes, though, are still very viable and I would not hesitate to fly on one. I know a lot of mechanics that wish we had the old DC-9's back due to their reliability!


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