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Exeter Plane Crash Question  
User currently offlineRichM From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 798 posts, RR: 7
Posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3891 times:

Years ago, there was a crash at Exeter. It was on the news. I don't know much about it though. Does anyone know when/what exactly happened? I did search, but didn't find anything.

Thanks.  Smile

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBennett123 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 7359 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3846 times:

There was a Viscount that crashed near Exeter.

User currently offlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19181 posts, RR: 52
Reply 2, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3833 times:

Talking about a 'crash,' a fuel tank from a fighter jet landed in North Devon (my home area) a week or two ago while the machine was in the air. It landed safely in Yeovil.


"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineBennett123 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 7359 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3797 times:

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19800717-0

User currently offlineDiesel1 From UK - Wales, joined Mar 2001, 1637 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3787 times:

July 17 1980

Alidair a small British charter airline operating Viscounts had been contracted to fly some ferry passengers stranded at Santander back to the UK.

The aircraft had already made one successful roundtrip that day, but when refuelled at Santander prior to its next flight to Exeter an error was made by the flight crew in not checking the fuel they thought had been received had actually been loaded to the aircraft.

On approach to Exeter, the Viscount lost power as the engines suffered fuel starvation

Excellent airmanship saw the flight crew safely put the aircaft down in a field a few miles away from the airport
Despite G ARBY, a 27 year old Viscount 708 being written off, no one lost their life, nor suffered serious injury

http://baaa-acro.com/photos/G-ARBY.jpg

In happier times...

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ian Oswald (via Martin Stephen)




I don't like signatures...
User currently offlineRichM From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 798 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3755 times:

Thanks for the replies. Although I am pretty sure this event happened after 1980. I wasn't even alive in 1980 and I remember hearing it on the news..

Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 2):
Talking about a 'crash,' a fuel tank from a fighter jet landed in North Devon (my home area) a week or two ago while the machine was in the air. It landed safely in Yeovil.

Yeah, I heard about that. Apparently the fuel tank narrowly missed a cyclist.


User currently offlinePRM From Burkina Faso, joined Apr 2002, 351 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3645 times:

Do you mean the Air Sofia An-12 a few years back (2001)? I remember it was bringing in some musical? equipment and the undercarriage failed on landing, and it then remained at the airfield for a couple of weeks whilst repairs were made. I think it was LZ-SFK, and it was the first visit of an An-12 to Exeter....

Maybe someone else has more details.

Paul


User currently offlinePRM From Burkina Faso, joined Apr 2002, 351 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3640 times:

www.btinternet.com/~C.C.Evans/html/x-air_news_archive.htm
There you are


User currently offlineEGTESkyGod From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 1712 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3618 times:
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On Tuesday 10th July 2001, an Antonov 124 crashed at Exeter Airport. I was an eyewitness to this, as I was on my second day of work experience with a (now defunct) flying school on the airfield.

The Russian crew had guns and allsorts on board as they were doing a film shoot somewhere in the Westcountry.

They came in on 26, hit the runway a bit hard, bounced about 50ft back into the air, at which point the starboard set of main wheels fell off. When they touched down for a second time, they skewed off to the right, onto the grass just after taxiway 'E', and the airport was closed for 8 hours.

When I came in the next morning, they had towed it a few hundred metres further up and dumped her on the grass beside 'E' for repairs. It was several months before they repaired her, maybe even a year, but on a visit to see my father in the Flybe hangar one day, the Antonov taxied out and departed Exeter.

I have some pictures at home somewhere of where they towed her to, I'll try to find out the registration for you.

[Edited 2006-01-20 10:13:43]


I came, I saw, I Concorde! RIP Michael Jackson
User currently offlinePRM From Burkina Faso, joined Apr 2002, 351 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3605 times:

10th July 2001

The first visit of an Antonov An-12 to Exeter proved rather eventful today. LZ-SFK of Air Sofia suffered an undercarriage collapse on landing on runway 26 at 1:30pm. The aircraft bounced on landing and regained the air. On it’s second contact with the ground the right undercarriage collapsed and the right wingtip contacted the ground. It slewed to the right some 110 degrees or so and came to rest on the northern taxiway after travelling some distance across the grass. Pieces of the aircraft, incuding substantial sections of undercarriage, were left on the runway and the grass in it’s wake. The runway and some runway lights were also damaged. The crew of 12 were able to walk away apparently unharmed. Exeter Airport was closed for some time and flights were diverted to Bristol. Once the aircraft had been inspected by the Air Accident Investigation Branch it was unloaded and, when lifting equipment was made available, moved as the CAA had declared that it was too close to the runway to allow normal services to me. Flight number SFB4401 was inbound from Casablanca with 8 tons of “theatrical props” - said to be weapons used during the making of a film. It is fortunate that the aircraft did not crash further down the runway as it could have slewed into several parked aircraft, including Nigel Mansell’s Citation. It looked a very sad sight with it’s right wingtip touching the ground and the left pointing skyward. Expect it to be at Exeter for quite some time.


User currently offlineEGTESkyGod From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 1712 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3585 times:
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From the AAIB website:

Antonov 12, LZ-SFK
AAIB Bulletin No: 11/2001 Ref: EW/G2001/07/11 Category: 1.1
Aircraft Type and Registration: Antonov 12, LZ-SFK
No & Type of Engines: 4 A1-20M turboprop engines
Year of Manufacture: 1964
Date & Time (UTC): 10 July 2001 at 1226 hrs
Location: Exeter Airport, Devon
Type of Flight: Public Transport (Cargo)
Persons on Board: Crew - 8 Passengers - 1
Injuries: Crew - None Passengers -
None
Nature of Damage: Right landing gear collapsed, right wing scraped.
Commander's Licence: Airline Transport Pilots Licence
Commander's Age: 46 years
Commander's Flying
Experience: 10,885 hours (of which 6,958 were on type)
Last 90 days - 33 hours
Last 28 days - 15 hours
Information Source: Aircraft Accident Report Form submitted by the
pilot
The aircraft had flown from Casablanca to Exeter carrying 7.7 tonnes of freight. The maximum
permitted landing weight for the aircraft was 58 tonnes and the actual landing weight was 51
tonnes. The weather at Exeter airport was; surface wind 250°, variable between 220° and 280°, at
11 kt, 5,000 metres in rain showers with cloud FEW at 800 feet, SCT at 1,600 feet and BKN at
2,500 feet with the runway surface reported as damp.
At FL 260 the autopilot was disconnected and the First Officer (FO), who was undergoing line
training flew the aircraft. ATC provided radar vectors for an ILS to Runway 26. On the base leg the
aircraft entered a heavy shower and conditions became turbulent but the aircraft was accurately
flown to intercept the ILS localiser. The aircraft commander had briefed the FO to carry out the
approach, which was to be flown manually with the commander following through on the controls.
It was the commander's intention to land the aircraft himself with the FO following through. The
aircraft was configured with 35° of landing flap and the landing gear was confirmed as locked
down. The approach was stabilised at an approach speed of 270 kph and at about 800 feet the crew
saw the approach lights. Due to the heavy rain and despite the windscreen wipers being selected on,
the forward visibility was poor and the crew continued flying on instruments down to decision
height (DH) of 200 feet. In order to maintain the glide slope, power was reduced below the 45%
torque normally required. After DH the approach was continued visually, aiming to touch down at
a point near the threshold of Runway 26. At approximately 50 feet the commander took control and
the aircraft nose pitched up. He found that the aircraft had a marked nose up trim, which required a
large force on the control column to overcome in order to adjust to the correct landing attitude. The
commander closed the throttles and the aircraft landed on the main landing gear, bounced a short
distance before touching down a second time. The right main landing gear collapsed during the
landing roll and the right wing tip sank to the ground as the speed reduced. The No.4 engine
propeller contacted the runway surface and the aircraft left the runway in a gentle arc to the right
some 500 metres from the runway threshold. It came to a stop on a grass area north of Runway 26
and adjacent to the northern taxiway approximately 800 metres from the touch down point. The
crew carried out the emergency shut down drills and vacated the aircraft through a side door in the
cargo hold. The airfield Rescue and Fire Fighting Service attended immediately.
The commander assessed the cause of the accident as an abrupt change of wind direction and speed
on the final approach after crossing the threshold. Additionally a breakdown in the co-ordination
between the commander and FO in allowing the aircraft to become so markedly trimmed nose up
had occurred. He also considered that the 3.5° glide path combined with his aiming for a point
before the ILS touch down zone might also have added to the aircraft's high rate of descent."


To see it yourself, visit

http://www.aaib.dft.gov.uk/cms_resources/dft_avsafety_pdf_501831.pdf



I came, I saw, I Concorde! RIP Michael Jackson
User currently offlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19181 posts, RR: 52
Reply 11, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3534 times:

Quoting RichM (Reply 5):
Apparently the fuel tank narrowly missed a cyclist.

Yeah, that's right.



"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineEGTESkyGod From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 1712 posts, RR: 12
Reply 12, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3387 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

There have, of course, been more recent accidents, of smaller aircraft, which wouldn't have made the news.


I came, I saw, I Concorde! RIP Michael Jackson
User currently offlineRichM From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 798 posts, RR: 7
Reply 13, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3230 times:

Quoting EGTESkyGod (Reply 10):

Thanks for that Charlie, I believe that was the accident that I was wondering about.  Smile

What caused the recent accidents that you were referring to?

Thanks again.  Smile


User currently offlineEGTESkyGod From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 1712 posts, RR: 12
Reply 14, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 3101 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting RichM (Reply 13):
What caused the recent accidents that you were referring to?

Hi. Details are on the AAIB website, www.aaib.gov.uk



I came, I saw, I Concorde! RIP Michael Jackson
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