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We're Sorry, The Price Of This Flight Has Changed  
User currently offlineAMSMAN From Ireland, joined Jan 2002, 1016 posts, RR: 6
Posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 14282 times:

So there I was checking out DUB - SEA for November this year and as I am shopping around, I checked out expedia.co.uk.

Found a decent fare: £339.30 (€496.50) via JFK.

Decided to check it out, and when I clicked on 'Choose this flight' I was greeted with We're sorry, the price of this flight has changed from £339.30 to £371.30 and asked to either choose again or accept.

How can they advertise it for one price, only for someone to proceed and find out the fare's been hiked up?

Also, I then checked via AMS for the advertised price of £417.10 only to be told that the price, this time, had been reduced to £359.50.

ALSO, the cheapest fare they have is the above £339.30 which, as I said earlier, is decent while the most expensive is £7,752.90. Who in their right mind would pay over 7k for a flight when they could pay £339.30.

Anyone experience this before with Expedia? It really makes ya think.

Cheers
AMSMAN


Aer Lingus, Proud to be Irish.
42 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineJbmitt From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 546 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 14273 times:

I'm sure it has to do with availibility of the fare bucket. If other people book the same leg it can bump classes.

User currently offlineBond007 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 5394 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 14253 times:

Quoting AMSMAN (Thread starter):
Anyone experience this before with Expedia? It really makes ya think.

Yes, all the time.

That's how the airline business works. Prices change by the minute depending on seats sold.

Extremely complicated pricing programs ... one more of the reasons they aren't doing well.


Jimbo



I'd rather be on the ground wishing I was in the air, than in the air wishing I was on the ground!
User currently offlineTWAAF9 From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 88 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 14205 times:

Ahh, the beauty of yield management.

However, I've also experienced the opposite happen: I don't really remember if I was TW or AA at the time, but I built and priced a PNR at the ticket counter and when I tried to ticket the reservation, the response was something like "NEW FARE FOUND--REPRICE" and the passenger ended up saving around $20. Same thing has happened to me years ago on lowestfare.com.

But it sounds like you got the fuzzy end of this lollipop.



Ahh, the power of SABRE...
User currently offlinePA110 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1989 posts, RR: 24
Reply 4, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 14160 times:
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Actually, this has often to do with the underlying GDS software being used by the various third-party interfaces like Expedia, Travelocity, etc...

Any travel agent who has tried to sell something via standard availability and not checked direct access knows how this happens.

Sometimes, the closeout message sent by airlines gets tied up in teletype channels, and is not immediately updated in the underlying GDS used by online vendors. When the actual selection is made, a sell message goes out to the carrier, hits the sold out flight. Some web interface systems will simply respond that the requested fare was not in fact availale, forcing you to search again. Systems like Expedia and Travelocity will save you that extra step by returning the next lowest fare.

I'm not saying that this definitely what happened in your case, but it is one of the reasons why sometimes a requested selection comes back at a higher price.



It's been swell, but the swelling has gone down.
User currently offlineRaffik From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2006, 1713 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 19 hours ago) and read 13755 times:

I've quite often had this problem with Expedia. There I was, last year- I had found a BHX-CDG-BEY-CDG-BHX flight, priced at £340 (coincidence). I rushed upstairs, grabbed my wallet.. I REALLY wanted this flight as the CDG-BEY-CDG sectors were operated by AF 773s. I got back to the pc, proceeded to check out, credit card in hand, only to be told that "We're sorry, the fare has changed to £480". I called Expedia and asked them why it had been changed and was told that all of the cheap seats had been sold, and the pricing on the website takes a while to update. I finally managed to find another flight, but the CDG-BEY-CDG sectors were opd by ME A330s, which is still nice  Smile

I don't think much of expedia- their customer service is lacking. They have rebooked my flights and not informed me in the past, as well as issuing me tickets in the wrong name, leaving me stranded at Heathrow trying to catch an ME flight to Beirut, only to be told by the airline that expedia hadn't even booked me on the flight. They never offered an apology, neither admitted it was their fault. On the other hand, you can often find cheap fares on their site, and it's fairly easy to book them, unless you come across the above mentioned problem regarding the fare increase. I do use them, because they tend to be the cheapest option.



Happy -go- lucky kinda guy!
User currently offlineHS748 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 13600 times:

This is a consistent feature of Expedia. I now use Expedia only to check fares - when I find one that looks good I simply go to the airline's own website where in 99% of cases the fare is the same or even slightly lower.

User currently offlineBicoastal From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 13575 times:

I've found that the airlines' own websites offer the best fares. I don't know why people even use Expedia, et. al. United even has a low fare guarantee on its site.

User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9097 posts, RR: 29
Reply 8, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 13552 times:

Quoting HS748 (Reply 6):
This is a consistent feature of Expedia. I now use Expedia only to check fares - when I find one that looks good I simply go to the airline's own website where in 99% of cases the fare is the same or even slightly lower.

That's exactly they way I do it as well. Back in the days when you had to call the Travel Agent for a booking, it could happen that while she offered you several price/carrier options by the time you made the decision, that particular price category was sold out. So the problem is not new at all.

The portals are good to check the market prices and for those people who don't care which carrier they fly once a year.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineBoeingguy1 From Ireland, joined Jan 2006, 415 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 13522 times:

Quoting Bicoastal (Reply 7):
I don't know why people even use Expedia, et. al. United even has a low fare guarantee on its site.

For reasons stated already... to check fares then buy them at the websites..  Yeah sure



Gatwick South! Id rather crash in Brighton!
User currently offlineBHMBAGLOCK From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 2698 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 13467 times:

I mostly use Travelocity and had not run into this until this past Monday. It jacked up my hotel by $5 per night but it's still a great deal.


Where are all of my respected members going?
User currently offlineBond007 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 5394 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 13454 times:

Quoting Boeingguy1 (Reply 9):
Quoting Bicoastal (Reply 7):
I don't know why people even use Expedia, et. al. United even has a low fare guarantee on its site.

For reasons stated already... to check fares then buy them at the websites..

Correct. If I'm flying between non-hub airports, I'm not going to check 4 or 5 airline websites just to see what is available and who flies there. Sure, If I'm flying from CLT, I go to USAir.com.

As for prices, they are usually the same (except Expedia $5 booking fee), with some exceptions.

Also, the Expedia interface is so much better than most of the airline's. The seat maps, list of flights, etc. etc. are very user-friendly.

It's usually my starting point at least.


Jimbo



I'd rather be on the ground wishing I was in the air, than in the air wishing I was on the ground!
User currently offlineGritzngravee From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 128 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 11944 times:

No one ever reads, READ THE FINE PRINT!! Same thing I tell borrowers signing the Note and Mortgage to their homes. Price changes are always explained in the FINE PRINT, easiet way to tell the consumer any price increase is justifiable or a written policy. Also the placement of words and vocabulary is used to further their policies, so again, READ THE FINE PRINT!! Even though no one wants to, it could save you heartache down the road in the future.

User currently offlineJetdeltamsy From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2987 posts, RR: 8
Reply 13, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 11698 times:

Quoting PA110 (Reply 4):
Any travel agent who has tried to sell something via standard availability and not checked direct access knows how this happens.

Sometimes, the closeout message sent by airlines gets tied up in teletype channels, and is not immediately updated in the underlying GDS used by online vendors. When the actual selection is made, a sell message goes out to the carrier, hits the sold out flight.

Exactly correct.

Expedia and other systems display the fare that was available the last time they checked the host system. You go onto Expedia and ask for that fare. When Expedia tries to book the fare, it is no longer available giving you the response you mentioned.

The only way to avoid this is to access the host system by going to the individual airline's web sites.

No matter what fare you find on Expedia, Travelocity or any of the other, ALWAYS double check on the airlines website that you are getting the lowest fare. Additoinally there is almost always a fee attached to Expedia and other vendor systems that does not exist on the carrier's website.

You almost always save money booking directly on the carrier's site. AND...making your purchase from the airlines' website makes you a direct customer of the airline..nobody is going to look at you when you have a ticket problem and say "talk to your travel agent".



Tired of airline bankruptcies....EA/PA/TW and finally DL.
User currently offlineHAMAD From United Arab Emirates, joined Apr 2000, 1159 posts, RR: 7
Reply 14, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 11360 times:

sometimes, expedia offers international deals that you can't find on the airlines websites, especially if you have to connect or planning a multi destination trip


PHX - i miss spotting
User currently offlineAirScoot From United States of America, joined May 2005, 688 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 11050 times:

Quoting HAMAD (Reply 14):
sometimes, expedia offers international deals that you can't find on the airlines websites, especially if you have to connect or planning a multi destination trip

Expedia is good for multi-carrier itineraries.. as are Orbitz and Travelocity - this is the major downside of shopping only at carrier sites.

Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 13):
You almost always save money booking directly on the carrier's site. AND...making your purchase from the airlines' website makes you a direct customer of the airline..nobody is going to look at you when you have a ticket problem and say "talk to your travel agent".

I know you're going to have a fit over this.. but I can't resist.. and I know you'll eventually get over it.

The only problem with this solution - ESPECIALLY with Delta.. is when there's a problem and you have to call the carrier as a direct client. If you're not Medallion (and even some times if you are).. you get... India. If you manage to get it fixed without getting totally twisted with the people on the phone (yes, I've had very nice people down there, but I've also had experiences with them that make me rather have dental work without anesthetic) it's worth the $5 you save.

With the exception of booking DL and US (because of prior customer service issues over the phone with them) I will tend to use the carrier's website.

Quoting PA110 (Reply 4):
Any travel agent who has tried to sell something via standard availability and not checked direct access knows how this happens.

Amen. Any travel agent who's done it with a client sitting in front of them only does it once too..  Silly

Quoting TWAAF9 (Reply 3):
I don't really remember if I was TW or AA at the time, but I built and priced a PNR at the ticket counter and when I tried to ticket the reservation, the response was something like "NEW FARE FOUND--REPRICE" and the passenger ended up saving around $20. Same thing has happened to me years ago on lowestfare.com.

That was TWA.  Smile


User currently offlineStarAlly From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 43 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 10914 times:

I went directly to Asiana's US website to price tickets from Chicago to Incheon via LAX and I got the same message. The price went from over 1,200 USD to over 3,000 USD!

This (ticket pricing) is something I have always found interesting. I would always wonder why 5-10 minutes later the price for a ticket would be a few dollars more.

I use to use websites like Expedia, Orbitz, etc because I would find lower fares. In the past year or so, however, many airlines are guaranteeing lower fares on their website.



Aaron Jason
User currently offlineCtbarnes From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3491 posts, RR: 50
Reply 17, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 10716 times:

Quoting TWAAF9 (Reply 3):
However, I've also experienced the opposite happen: I don't really remember if I was TW or AA at the time, but I built and priced a PNR at the ticket counter and when I tried to ticket the reservation, the response was something like "NEW FARE FOUND--REPRICE" and the passenger ended up saving around $20. Same thing has happened to me years ago on lowestfare.com.

I've also had that happen. A couple of times on ual.com I've selected a fare and when it was time to book the fare dropped by $10-20. Oddly, I've never had the fare revised upwards.

In the end, it's a crapshoot.

Charles, SJ



The customer isn't a moron, she is your wife -David Ogilvy
User currently offlineJetdeltamsy From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2987 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 10693 times:

Quoting AirScoot (Reply 15):
Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 13):
You almost always save money booking directly on the carrier's site. AND...making your purchase from the airline's website makes you a direct customer of the airline..nobody is going to look at you when you have a ticket problem and say "talk to your travel agent".

I know you're going to have a fit over this.. but I can't resist.. and I know you'll eventually get over it.

The only problem with this solution - ESPECIALLY with Delta.. is when there's a problem and you have to call the carrier as a direct client. If you're not Medallion (and even some times if you are).. you get... India. If you manage to get it fixed without getting totally twisted with the people on the phone

I understand and agree with you 100%. But in my mind, my scenario has the customer dealing with agents at the airport.

Some airport agents, especially poorly trained ones, use the "talk to your travel agent" as a way of not dealing with a potentially difficult transaction. In my opinion, a passenger is the mutual customer of the agency and the airline. We should never say "talk to your travel agent" because the passenger is still our customer.

The offshore call center idea is a disaster. People in North America prefer speaking to people who sound like them. Once the restructuring is complete, I have a feeling those centers will return to North America.



Tired of airline bankruptcies....EA/PA/TW and finally DL.
User currently offlineSabena332 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 10693 times:

Quoting AMSMAN (Thread starter):
Decided to check it out, and when I clicked on 'Choose this flight' I was greeted with We're sorry, the price of this flight has changed from £339.30 to £371.30 and asked to either choose again or accept.

This is the reason why I don't book anything on Expedia anymore.

Patrick


User currently offlineAnair80 From Suriname, joined Oct 2000, 245 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 10422 times:

What I use is: http://www.sidestep.com or http://www.kayak.com and then check what fares they offer on the routes.
Then i go to the airline's website, check & check, and then book.
I too had problems with Expedia and i find them lacking service.

So check it out, but go to the individual airline and then book your flight.
Works best for me!!!

Cheers
Anair80


User currently offlineYhz78 From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 147 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 9946 times:

Quoting Raffik (Reply 5):
They have rebooked my flights and not informed me in the past, as well as issuing me tickets in the wrong name, leaving me stranded at Heathrow trying to catch an ME flight to Beirut, only to be told by the airline that expedia hadn't even booked me on the flight. They never offered an apology, neither admitted it was their fault.

It's not the airlines fault, you booked through a third party and it is their responsibility. Airlines can't be expected to be constantly checking all their PNR's for problems. 90% of the major ticketing problems I see have discount websites involved in some way or another.....but I guess that is what happens when your biggest concern is trying to find the cheapest way. You get what you paid for.



Canada Rocks! From the west coast to the best coast!
User currently offlineCtbarnes From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3491 posts, RR: 50
Reply 22, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 9787 times:

Quoting Yhz78 (Reply 21):
It's not the airlines fault, you booked through a third party and it is their responsibility. Airlines can't be expected to be constantly checking all their PNR's for problems. 90% of the major ticketing problems I see have discount websites involved in some way or another.....but I guess that is what happens when your biggest concern is trying to find the cheapest way. You get what you paid for.

One thing to be careful of: Airline booking websites are not actually a part of the airline, but are outsourced to a third party. I found this out to my chigrin back in 2000 when I booked a flight to YYZ on ual.com on an AC codeshare. They had to issue a paper ticket at the time, and the ticket never showed up. UA refused to re-issue the ticket despite being assured by ual.com UA could do so, and so I spent 3 days getting the runaround before finally finding someone with their head screwed on who was able to authorize it.

Charles, SJ
(edited for grammar)

[Edited 2006-03-08 23:11:24]


The customer isn't a moron, she is your wife -David Ogilvy
User currently offlineBN747DFWHNL From United States of America, joined May 2005, 53 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 8253 times:

Last week I was researching DEN/RSW flights for a few weeks from now and was miffed at the prices. I found a great $319 fare on NW through DTW (don't remember the exact site since I was checking them all); upon clicking on it, however, I got the dreaded words that headline this thread. The new fare: $1,289, a $900 difference! Give me a break; sounds like the airlines are taking gouging seminars from the oil companies.

User currently offlinePgtravel From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 446 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 8197 times:

Quoting Anair80 (Reply 20):
What I use is: http://www.sidestep.com or http://www.kayak.com and then check what fares they offer on the routes.
Then i go to the airline's website, check & check, and then book.
I too had problems with Expedia and i find them lacking service.

Why would you need to go separately to the airline's website? I work for PriceGrabber.com Travel (similar to Kayak and Sidestep), and at least with the many airlines that work with us, you can do the search and click directly to the airline site from there. Granted, this doesn't work for every airline in the world (yet), but it certainly saves a couple steps.


25 Falcon790 : A price that was supposed to be $290 had once changed to $1400 once I was shopping for ticket on expedia.com To ridiculous! -Vala
26 Anair80 : Because of past experience, i go to the airline to double check. Yes, i could use Pricegrabber as well (First time i actually heard of it, i checked
27 Raffik : I'm not blaming the airline- I blame Expedia. I think it's unfair that the prices they advertise and display on their website does not reflect the RE
28 Bond007 : I disagree somewhat. The price that Expedia advertises is correct at the time they display it. The same is true for an airline website. Once the seat
29 Lapper : Indeed, but I see from your signature that your next flight is LGW-AUH-BEY-AUH-LGW. You wouldn't find that by going straight to ba.com. What you are
30 Jush : That's how you gotta do it. Did it with LH on FRA-GRU-SCL. I checked expedia just to see that LH offers a retunr for 890€. Changed to the LH websit
31 Raffik : Yes, I am travelling with EY. And Expedia offered the most competitive price for the route- just £360. I cannot fault them for this- it was cheaper t
32 Ctbarnes : I do that too, but I have a question. If I book a flight, say, on AA.com, but am a member of AS Mileage Plan, how easy is it to book the flight and g
33 Malaysia : I tried to find a deal on AA.com to Nassau, but instead it gave me US Airways (priced it lower than on the US site, so I went ahead and booked via AA.
34 STLGph : It's a bait and switch tactic. You call them and call them out on it, and they'll give you the refund of the price difference.
35 Post contains images Bond007 : No, it's legacy airline pricing models. Once a certain fare is sold out, you get the next one. They won't give you a refund...you should have booked
36 Post contains images SATX : People spending somebody else's money? I've seen it with most such websites. Never seen it happen on southwest.com though. That doesn't explain why t
37 Post contains images AirScoot : Since you repeated yourself 3 times... The difference (99.999% of the time) has to do with the difference between standard and (insert GDS term here.
38 Jetdeltamsy : Where I come from, every wasted dollar counts. Why give Expedia or Travelocity $5 that you don't have to spend? Yes, it does. The vendor system is st
39 Pgtravel : Thank you for pointing that out. You actually can still search ICN by typing in the city code and not using the "auto-fill" functionality, but it sho
40 Bond007 : Right, you're paying for convenience and your time saved. Personally I choose to pay $5, others may not, but the others have to go to the airline's w
41 Anair80 : Great, Thanks for the info! and I'll keep checking it out for more stuff. I do now understand why certain things won't show up, because you don't (no
42 Post contains images SATX : I wish it were quicker about these sorts of things. I get annoyed with the higher prices on the last screen. For the first few years of Expedia/Trave
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