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F/A Turnover Rates At Regionals  
User currently offlineFlyboy80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1875 posts, RR: 3
Posted (8 years 1 month 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2897 times:

I'm 18 and have considered, over the past few months, becoming an F/A for a regional in a few months when I finsih flight school as a treat to my self, kind of take a year off and relax. Anyways, at 18 im limited to pinnacle, mesa and colgan, and I think theres maybe a couple more, I know some hire at 19 but I'm unsure if exceptions are ever made? Im curious though about the regionals, they all seem to be continuously hiring for inflight. Now, having airline background in my family I know that the regionals are fun for a while but don't seem to be a great career choice, for obvious reasons, and probably one leading to the turnover rates. Anyways, I'm simply curious about turnover statistics, and if anyone has any. Examples: How many F/As certain carriers hire per month, how many quit in the first year...etc. WARNING: Im not looking for advice on what to do with my life so those of you planning on telling me this is a waste of time, that is great, but I didn't ask...thanks everyone for useful input, looking forward to it!

18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBR715-A1-30 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (8 years 1 month 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 2885 times:

Most Regional Flight Attendants use them as a "Gateway"... They are always looking for the BBD. You'll see a flight attendant start with a regional and either move to mainline or move to an LCC... I.E. Shuttle America moving up to United or Southwest.

User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 5845 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (8 years 1 month 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2846 times:

Quoting Flyboy80 (Thread starter):
telling me this is a waste of time, that is great, but I didn't ask

I know you didn't ask, but I think this will be a waste of time for you.






(Well, someone was going to be a smartass and do it eventually. I might as well have been me.  Wink )



Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineBahadir From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 1757 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (8 years 1 month 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2792 times:

Avoid Colgan. You will be a happier F/A in the other two. I know the turn over rate in Mesa is pretty high as well, but Mesa's business plan is based on high turnovers and low low wages.


Earthbound misfit I
User currently offlineJeremy From United States of America, joined May 2001, 668 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (8 years 1 month 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2771 times:

Pinnacle is cool, except for the low pay.

You would have to be based out of MEM, DTW, or MSP though.

Contact me if you need more info or are ready to apply.



You are now free to be sexually harassed and then terminated for filing a complaint--Southwest Airlines to me.
User currently offlineRJpieces From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 1 month 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2754 times:

Could you just become an F/A for a year?

User currently offlineFlyboy80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1875 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (8 years 1 month 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 2658 times:

thanks for the help so far guys, really appreciate it

User currently offlineAloha73G From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2335 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (8 years 1 month 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2628 times:

Quoting RJpieces (Reply 5):
Could you just become an F/A for a year?


Why not? Unless they make you sign some sort of contract with financial penalties for bailing, there is no reason that you couldn't jump ship when you had enough.

-Aloha!



Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!
User currently offlineTango-Bravo From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 3788 posts, RR: 29
Reply 8, posted (8 years 1 month 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2618 times:

Quoting Flyboy80 (Thread starter):
Im curious though about the regionals, they all seem to be continuously hiring for inflight.

IMHO you have answered your own inquiry concerning turnover rates at regionals with the sentence quoted above. It's not as though the regionals are hiring due to major expansion nor is it as though the larger airlines are hiring FAs away from the regionals in significant numbers. Therefore, I would surmise the regionals are continuously hiring for inflight due mainly to high turnover rates which are attributable mainly to low pay or wretched working conditions or both.


User currently offlineFlyboy80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1875 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (8 years 1 month 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 2539 times:

One company that looks kind of cool to me is American Eagle, but their published minimum age requirement is 19...(damn)

User currently offlineAa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3345 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (8 years 1 month 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2525 times:

Quoting Flyboy80 (Thread starter):
I'm unsure if exceptions are ever made?

No, they aren't.

Quoting Tango-Bravo (Reply 8):
Therefore, I would surmise the regionals are continuously hiring for inflight due mainly to high turnover rates which are attributable mainly to low pay or wretched working conditions or both.

Flight attendant positions at regionals are easy to come by for a reason. $16 an hour for 70 flight hours (which could easily translate into 300 hours away from base) is about $13,440 a month, plus at some airlines you'll end up in high cost cities like New York, Chicago, Washington, etc, where $13,000 a year barely covers rent.

AAndrew


User currently offlineAa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3345 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (8 years 1 month 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2521 times:

Forgot to include this in my last post. If you are looking for a "fun" job, you should look at a charter airline, like Miami Air, Omni Air, World, etc. You'll be flying around vacationers to nice places and have long layovers. Either Omni Air or World has something like a week long layover for flight attendants in Kuwait. My aunt was a charter flight attendant in the late 1980s and spent time in places like Aruba, Bonaire, Mexico, Atlantic City, etc. I don't know about you, but flying a hot, dirty SAAB 340 between Dallas and Amarillo just doesn't seem all that exciting.

AAndrew


User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 1 month 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2519 times:

Have you considered working for one of the regionals in a non-flight crew position until you are old enough for an F/A position? It would give your some valuable experience on how the other half lives, plus it would be a foot in the door that would probably make it easier to get into an inflight position in the airline. It's actually not uncommon for some F/As to have worked in other areas of an airline before they became F/As.

User currently offlineS5FA170 From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 534 posts, RR: 4
Reply 13, posted (8 years 1 month 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2447 times:

At Shuttle America / Chautauqua / Republic Airlines, our average flight attendant lasts 8 months according to Inflight.

We start hiring at 19 years old. I was hired at 20. But a lot of people I work with started right at 19.

-Tony



Prepare doors for departure and cross-check.
User currently offlineCRJ900 From Norway, joined Jun 2004, 2152 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (8 years 1 month 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2443 times:
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Isn't it very expensive to have to arrange training courses for new FAs all the time? The course lasts about 5 weeks, doesn't it, and requires lots of instructors and mock-up cabins and other stuff?

Wouldn't it be cheaper to pay the existing FAs a few dollars more per hour and keep them for several years?



Come, fly the prevailing winds with me
User currently offlineAa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3345 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (8 years 1 month 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2409 times:

Quoting CRJ900 (Reply 14):
Wouldn't it be cheaper to pay the existing FAs a few dollars more per hour and keep them for several years?

No.

There is usually one main instructor and he or she is just a flight attendant. The mock up cabins are mostly one-time costs. It is much cheaper to have a flight attendant quit after two or three years then to keep them on.

COST OF TRAINING<
$30/day in per diem for thirty days = $900
$39/night (airlines get discounts) for a hotel room shared by two people = $585
$1,500 in payment for completing training = $1,500
$2,800 in instructor costs, divided by twenty students = $140
$200 a student in miscellenaous expenses.
Total cost: $3,325

Payscale:
1 year: $17.00
2 years: $18.90
3 years: $19.46
4 years: $20.55
5 years: $22.00
6 years: $23.35
7 years: $25.05

Flight attendant "A" flies at the airline for three years.
Year One Pay: $14,280.00
Year Two Pay: $15,876.00
Year Three Pay: $16,346.00

Flight attendant "B" flies at the airline for seven years.
Year One Pay: $14,280.00
Year Two Pay: $15,876.00
Year Three Pay: $16,346.00
Year Four Pay: $17,262.00
Year Five Pay: $18,480.00
Year Six Pay: $19,614.00
Year Seven Pay: $21,042.00

When you include training cost for both flight attendants, flight attendant "A" cost the airline $1,384.08 a month, while flight attendant "B" cost the airline $1,502.67 a month, which is 8% more.

You wouldn't want the flight attendant to leave after, say, four months, but you would want the flight attendant to leave after, in this example, about three years.

AAndrew


User currently offlinePoitin From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 1 month 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2274 times:

Quoting Aloha73G (Reply 7):
Quoting RJpieces (Reply 5):
Could you just become an F/A for a year?


Why not? Unless they make you sign some sort of contract with financial penalties for bailing, there is no reason that you couldn't jump ship when you had enough.

-Aloha!

Correct!

Almost all NON-UNION employees in US companies are "at will". That means you can be fired without cause, although there some limits to that depending on the state. (Unionized employees are cover by the union's contract.)

This is generally a statement within the "offer" letter, which you are asked to sign. That is, in fact, a contract that they can pull out later and say "see, he agreed to be 'at will'".

The point of this is unless there is a specific provision about repaying them for training or other liabilities, you can simply say "Thanks for the work, but I am moving on now." because you are "at will" and that is a two-way street. You do not have to give them a reason either.

However, that said, job hopping is a bad thing to do and most employers will look at such a record as a bad risk for them. So change jobs carefully and wisely.


User currently offlineApodino From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 4124 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (8 years 1 month 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2257 times:

You might want to take a look at us at ZW as well. I know our flight attendants are Unionized, and even though we are a regional I know several flight attendants with us who have been with the company at least 20-25 years. You can commute to work if you wish, the only problem is that our domiciles (PHL, DCA, ORF) are not in cheap living areas. That being said, you could make it with us, and from my observation, longevity is a good think at us.

That being said, given the safety sensitive nature of the flight attendant position, isn't it a game of russian roulette to have a high turnover and in case of an emergency, wouldn't it be better to have experienced people handling it, especially since most regional flight attendants work by themselves. Imagine if the flight attendant turnover at a United or American was this short? We would be crying foul. Why should regionals be any different? Thats why I think there should be an FAA flight attendant certificate you have to get before being hired as a flight attendant, much like a dispatcher or a pilots certificate. The airlines training would still be the same, because the FARs are specific as to what is required.


User currently offlineFlyboy80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1875 posts, RR: 3
Reply 18, posted (8 years 1 month 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2235 times:

ZW is 19 right? I've actually wanted to work for ZW since the first time I saw a white united express 146 when I was like six years old at Stapleton.

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