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Solar Eclipse : Any Precautions On Aircafts?  
User currently offlineGr8Circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3092 posts, RR: 4
Posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2121 times:

Was watching images of the solar eclipse recently seen in parts of Northern Africa....was wondering that there must have been quite a few aircraft flying through the path of the eclipse at that time....

Do pilots take special precautions to protect themselves from harmful radiation during the eclipse? Are announcements made to pax, warning them about the possible consequences of viewing the eclipse without protection?

13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTimz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 6767 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2112 times:

What harmful radiation?

User currently offlineGr8Circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3092 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2091 times:

Quoting Timz (Reply 1):
What harmful radiation?

I don't know the technical details, but it is always advised that solar eclipses should be observed using dark glasses, etc. as there is a danger of ultravoilet radiation when you stare at the darkened sun...the light is cut out but the radiation is still hitting your eyes directly....


User currently offlineTornado82 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2085 times:

Quoting Gr8Circle (Reply 2):
but it is always advised that solar eclipses should be observed using dark glasses, etc. as there is a danger of ultravoilet radiation when you stare at the darkened sun...the light is cut out but the radiation is still hitting your eyes directly....

If you stare at the sun at ANY time you'll get dangerous radiation in your eyes. The difference is, people aren't typically staring at the sun on a normal clear day at high noon because common sense says it'll hurt your eyes. During the eclipse they see the darkened sun and think it's fine to stare into it, and then they pay the consequences if not taking the proper precautions.

Don't believe me? Stare into the sun at noon on the next clear day wherever you are.  Cool


User currently offlineDLPMMM From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 3589 posts, RR: 10
Reply 4, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2085 times:

Quoting Timz (Reply 1):
What harmful radiation?

Quite correct, there is no harmful radiation thet is connected with a solar eclipse. It is only the moon's shadow on the earth. Pilots would be advised not to stare at the sun, just as they would be advised not to stare at the sun when there is not an eclipse in progress.


User currently offlineDLPMMM From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 3589 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2062 times:

Quoting Gr8Circle (Reply 2):
I don't know the technical details, but it is always advised that solar eclipses should be observed using dark glasses, etc. as there is a danger of ultravoilet radiation when you stare at the darkened sun...the light is cut out but the radiation is still hitting your eyes directly....

NO!!!

Never observe an eclipse with dark glasses (except perhaps welder's glasses).

Do you want to blind ignorant pre-teens reading these forums?

The safe way to observe an eclipse is by making a simple pin-hole projector (a common 5th grade science project that you could google if you are interested).

The radiation emitted by the sun does not change because the moon passes in front of it.

Apparently the school systems in Canada are no better than the school systems in the USA.


User currently offlineGr8Circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3092 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2062 times:

Quoting Tornado82 (Reply 3):
If you stare at the sun at ANY time you'll get dangerous radiation in your eyes. The difference is, people aren't typically staring at the sun on a normal clear day at high noon because common sense says it'll hurt your eyes. During the eclipse they see the darkened sun and think it's fine to stare into it, and then they pay the consequences if not taking the proper precautions.

Don't believe me? Stare into the sun at noon on the next clear day wherever you are.



Quoting DLPMMM (Reply 4):
Quite correct, there is no harmful radiation thet is connected with a solar eclipse. It is only the moon's shadow on the earth. Pilots would be advised not to stare at the sun, just as they would be advised not to stare at the sun when there is not an eclipse in progress.

Hey, that's exaclty what I'm asking about.....maybe worded it wrongly....it's the deceptive feeling during an eclipse, because the sunlight is reduced or cut off entirely....anyways, do pilots make any announcements or require pax to pull down the window shades or something? That's what I wanted to know.... smile 


User currently offlineGr8Circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3092 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2052 times:

Quoting DLPMMM (Reply 5):
Apparently the school systems in Canada are no better than the school systems in the USA.


"Do you want to blind ignorant pre-teens reading these forums?"

Where, my dear friend, do you find me suggesting this?  

The safe way to observe an eclipse is by making a simple pin-hole projector (a common 5th grade science project that you could google if you are interested).

Good suggestion....

The radiation emitted by the sun does not change because the moon passes in front of it.

I know that....where did I say that there is any 'change' in radiation during an eclipse....????

I think you've misunderstood my question altogether and taken off on a very odd tangent.....sadly, none of you have been able to contribute in any meaningful way to the simple question that I asked....

[Edited 2006-03-30 19:56:25]

User currently offlineDaleaholic From UK - England, joined Oct 2005, 3206 posts, RR: 13
Reply 8, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 2021 times:

I Imagine if they know the eclipse will happen while they are in the air, the FA's would hand out special eclipse glasses which protect the eyes. As for the pilot's, I don't know but using common sense, I suppose they either put it on autopilot and put on their eclipse glasses to watch or they just look away at the controls while it happens.


Religion is an illusion of childhood... Outgrown under proper education.
User currently offlineExpressJet_ERJ From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 833 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 1914 times:

The sun doesnt get brighter during an eclipse or multiply its forces. Its just the 100,000,000 idiots that stare at it without protection. Would you normally stare at the sun for 30 seconds? I know i wouldnt. Just FYI the sun is actually not as bright during an eclipse.


ETOPS...Engines Turn Or People Swim
User currently offlineAntares From Australia, joined Jun 2004, 1402 posts, RR: 39
Reply 10, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 1740 times:

It is perfectly safe to observe the fully eclipsed sun with the naked eyes.

All you will see is the black circle of the lunar disc surrounded by the solar corona, against a deep twlight sky in a long eclipse, less deep in shorter ones.

There are no radiation issues.

I have done that a number of times, and my eyesight is pretty good for my age.

However you must NEVER observe any portion of the solar disc with the naked eye, including the very last moments of deep partial eclipse right up to the appearance of the 'diamond ring effect' when a few bright elements of the solar disc seem to hang on the edge of the lunar disc before it is finally fully eclipsed.

Also, you must never observe a really, really short solar eclipse with the naked eye, as in one that last but a second or too, as the lunar disc will be blazing with a set of bright points that can damage your retinas.

So called annular eclipses, where the moon passes in front of the sun, yet doesn't totally eclipse it, leaving a ring of fire effect, are also very dangerous to glimpse without protection or the use of indirect projection.

I was bemused by the television coverage of yesterday's eclipse with people looking at it through glasses in places like India where it was nothing more than a partial eclipse, which are hardly worth bothering with.

In case you think the children should be locked indoors or hidden away from a total eclipse, let me tell you no-one on earth will ever be in doubt about when the sun is totally eclipsed and when it is not. The next one, across the high arctic, Sibera, and central Asia, is in August 2008.

Antares


User currently offlineYVRlonghauler From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 1693 times:

Have solar flares gotten so bad as to disrupt aviation operations ever? I think I remember hearing something about it before.

User currently offlineAntares From Australia, joined Jun 2004, 1402 posts, RR: 39
Reply 12, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 1684 times:

Apparently solar flares cause some airlines to avoid high latitude northern routes passing near the magnetic north pole, or areas of intense auroral activity.

However I've never been sure if these reports were exaggerations, or whether the airlines were being overly cuatious (probably not a bad thing) or whatever.

One article claimed that Finnair had rules about pregnant flight attendants doing too many high latitude routes that might increase their radiation dose, as well as advising or insisting that they not fly during times of hightened solar activity.

I also think there has been confusion in the media over cosmic radiation from beyond the solar system and its increased intensity at high altitudes likes those flown by Concorde, and solar flare issues which are also made worse by increased cruise levels.

Concorde was obviously more exposed by its altitude, but it had a thicker fuselage (and a lower cabin altitude) and of course crossed through the danger zones more than twice as fast as a normal jet.

I guess you'd have to search for aviation medicine articles to get definitive answers to your questions. It would be interesting to follow any links you chance upon since I have yet to find a good source on this.

Antares


User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11153 posts, RR: 59
Reply 13, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 1665 times:

Quoting DLPMMM (Reply 5):
The safe way to observe an eclipse is by making a simple pin-hole projector (a common 5th grade science project that you could google if you are interested).

You can actually view a total eclipse in its total phase with the naked eye. You have to make sure to look away just before totality ends though.

It is partial and annular eclipses that are the most dangerous as they can't be viewed safely with the naked eye at any phase because the moon doesn't block the entire sun during any of the phases.



"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
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