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Standard To ER  
User currently offlineTzadik From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 114 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1130 times:

My ole man asked me this question yesterday and i honestly have no idea... He noticed that Delta has roughly 28 standard 767's and was wondering if it is possible to convert said aircraft into ER's. Can a 767-300 be converted into a 767-300ER?

4 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDalb777 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2192 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1104 times:

The non ER's are not ETOPS rated, and it would cost a lot of money to get them rated.

Don't know if more fuel tanks could be added, though, to increase the range.



Geaux Tigers! Geaux Hornets! Geaux Saints! WHO DAT!!!
User currently offlineDelta4eva From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 344 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1073 times:

I don't think it would be a problem to add extra fuel tanks. However, it would be expensive to convert to the aircraft to ETOPS. Also, the ER's have a larger cargo door that allows for larger containers. This would also cost quite a bit of money to convert the small doors into the larger doors.

With the cost advantages of the 787, it would be a better investment just to purchase 787s instead of converting all of the non-ERs into ERs.



FLY DELTA JETS
User currently offlineTzadik From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 114 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1048 times:

Quoting Delta4eva (Reply 2):
With the cost advantages of the 787, it would be a better investment just to purchase 787s instead of converting all of the non-ERs into ERs.

Delta might be in good enough financial situation to place orders sometime in the next life Big grin

Quoting Dalb777 (Reply 1):
not ETOPS rated, and it would cost a lot of money to get them rated.

what is the full process for getting the ETOPS rating and what are the major cost contributing factors? Thanks.


User currently offlineDalb777 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2192 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1037 times:

Here is some usefull information on ETOPS:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ETOPS

Quote:
Approval for ETOPS

ETOPS approval is a two-step process. Firstly, the aircraft airframe and engine combination must satisfy the basic ETOPS requirements during its type certification. This is called ETOPS type approval. Such tests may include shutting down an engine and flying the remaining engine during the complete diversion time. Often such tests are performed in middle of the oceans. It must be demonstrated that during the diversion flight that the flight crew is not unduly burdened by extra workload due to the lost engine and that the probability of the remaining engine failing is extremely remote. For example, if an aircraft is rated for ETOPS-180, it means that it should be able to fly with full load and just one engine for 3 hours.

In addition to operating aircraft which are appropriately type-rated, an operator who conducts ETOPS flights must satisfy his own country's aviation regulators about his ability to conduct ETOPS flights. This is called ETOPS operational approval and involves compliance with additional special engineering and flight crew procedures on top of the normal engineering and flight procedures. Pilots and engineering staff must be specially qualified and trained for ETOPS. An airline with extensive experience operating long distance flights may be awarded ETOPS operational approval immediately, others may need to demonstrate ability through a series of ETOPS proving flights. An ETOPS operational approval rating cannot exceed the ETOPS type approval rating of an airplane.

Regulators closely watch the ETOPS performance of both type certificate holders and their affiliated airlines. Any technical incidents prejudicial to an ETOPS flight must be recorded. From the data collected globally, the reliability of the particular airframe-engine combination is measured and statistics published. The figures must be within limits of type certifications. Of course, the figures required for ETOPS-180 will always be more stringent that ETOPS-120. Unsatisfactory figures would lead to a downgrade, or worse, suspension of ETOPS capabilities either for the type certificate holder or the airline.



Geaux Tigers! Geaux Hornets! Geaux Saints! WHO DAT!!!
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