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Ryanair 9.5hr Delivery Flight Currently Enroute!  
User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3947 posts, RR: 18
Posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 6525 times:

Very rare indeed!

Ryanair's next one is a-coming!  Wow!

'RYR800M' EI-DLM departed BFI at 0414z and is due Dublin at 1405z, non-stop!

Routing is taking it over YXC J505 YYC J505 YVC J540 YYL J539 YYQ NCA/E EPMAN SF GANGI PEVAR MASIK DA GIMLI KEF BREKI 61N016W 60N015W GOMUP MIMKU UP6 MORAG UL18 TADEX UL18 DUB

Total flight time 9hrs 24mins!

R  spin 

26 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineOyKIE From Norway, joined Jan 2006, 2752 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 6499 times:

Hey cool!!! Thank you for providing the information.

By the way. I seem to remember that when SAS brought the MD-90 over seas they flew first to the east coast, and then was able to fly directly to Bergen (westcoast of Norway) if the weather was good, or else they had to do a tech stop in Iceland.



Dream no small dream; it lacks magic. Dream large, then go make that dream real - Donald Douglas
User currently offlineHawaijahaz From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 352 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 6491 times:

9.5 hours!!

I guess that's the longest that this Ryanair bird will ever do.

PG


User currently offlineSmokeyrosco From Ireland, joined Dec 2005, 2112 posts, RR: 13
Reply 3, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 6257 times:

yippie, another shiney beauty, and it's due to arrive just before i start work.


John Hancock
User currently offlineBritannia191a From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 262 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 6193 times:

This has inspired a question now. Who actually flies the delivery flights. Is is the pilots of the airline or the Aircraft Manufacturer pilots. If its the latter i assume they get a schedule plane back. Anyone knows how it all works.

Thanks


User currently offlineEI321 From Iraq, joined Jul 2009, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 6155 times:

AFAIK the airline sends its own pilots to pick up the aircraft.

User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3947 posts, RR: 18
Reply 6, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 6077 times:

Yes Ryanair's own pilots drive them home. The distinctive Irish accent is always heard on the radio as they leave BFI.

R


User currently offlineStar_world From Ireland, joined Jun 2001, 1234 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 5942 times:

See its progress here: http://flightaware.com/live/flight/RYR800M

User currently offlineWorldTraveler From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 5798 times:

the pilots go and airlines usually send delivery engineers. just like a car, when you accept delivery, you are assuming responsibility for it. once you agree all is well, it's yours.

User currently offlineOyKIE From Norway, joined Jan 2006, 2752 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 5772 times:

Quoting Britannia191a (Reply 4):
This has inspired a question now. Who actually flies the delivery flights. Is is the pilots of the airline or the Aircraft Manufacturer pilots. If its the latter i assume they get a schedule plane back. Anyone knows how it all works.

Thanks

As mentioned before it is the airlines who brings home the airplanes. I would pay a great deal of money to get on a flight flike this.



Dream no small dream; it lacks magic. Dream large, then go make that dream real - Donald Douglas
User currently offlineStar_world From Ireland, joined Jun 2001, 1234 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 5745 times:

Interesting that the route took it over KEF in Iceland - I presume this was a precaution - staying closer to land, or is it related to ETOPS?

User currently offlineShamrocka330 From Ireland, joined Sep 2005, 287 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 5671 times:

Thanks for the info Robk, I went out to the airport and saw it arriving at 14:46! Another lovely, clean aircraft for Ryanair!

Just a quick question on this aircraft....it parked at a remote stand at the moment, when can it go into service? Do they have to wait for registration confirmation/ certification, Ryanair equipment etc before it can perform its first revenue flight?



aka thebigjd (member since Sept 2001)
User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3947 posts, RR: 18
Reply 12, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 5639 times:

Quoting WorldTraveler (Reply 8):
the pilots go and airlines usually send delivery engineers. just like a car, when you accept delivery, you are assuming responsibility for it. once you agree all is well, it's yours.

The acceptance flight - which is what you're referring to I believe - is a separate flight altogether and done under a Boeing callsign. Only when the the airline/engineers/pilots are happy that everything is okay will it then leave on its ferry flight.

Quoting Star_world (Reply 10):
Interesting that the route took it over KEF in Iceland - I presume this was a precaution - staying closer to land, or is it related to ETOPS?

Probably neither, just weather patterns and that route was the best tail wind component. ETOPS doesn't come into it on ferry flights anyway.

Quoting Shamrocka330 (Reply 11):
Just a quick question on this aircraft....it parked at a remote stand at the moment, when can it go into service? Do they have to wait for registration confirmation/ certification, Ryanair equipment etc before it can perform its first revenue flight?

Their new ones have been known to go into service on the same day after arriving from the US iirc, but of late their new ones have been sent to Prestwick for temporary storage, but don't ask me why.

R


User currently offlineRyanair737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 5603 times:

A depiction of the route of flight it took.



Regards
Ryanair737


User currently offlineShamrocka330 From Ireland, joined Sep 2005, 287 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 5529 times:

Quoting RobK (Reply 12):
but of late their new ones have been sent to Prestwick for temporary storage, but don't ask me why.

could be something to do with the lack of pilots?



aka thebigjd (member since Sept 2001)
User currently offlineFlyDreamliner From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2759 posts, RR: 15
Reply 15, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 5500 times:

That flight is amazing - almost sounds like a record distance for a 738.


"Let the world change you, and you can change the world"
User currently offlineDrinkstrolley From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 5016 times:

Quoting RobK (Reply 6):
The distinctive Irish accent is always heard on the radio as they leave BFI.

My mate flies for Ryanair, he's German. Or does he have to put on a Irish accent when he's at work?


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26499 posts, RR: 75
Reply 17, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 4919 times:

Quoting Drinkstrolley (Reply 16):
My mate flies for Ryanair, he's German. Or does he have to put on a Irish accent when he's at work?

 rotfl  rotfl  rotfl  rotfl 

Quoting FlyDreamliner (Reply 15):
That flight is amazing - almost sounds like a record distance for a 738.

I wouldn't be surprised if it was close. A BBJ (737-700) did BFI/SEA-JED, which is the record flight for any 737. Did they tank this thing?



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9386 posts, RR: 29
Reply 18, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 4901 times:

Quoting OyKIE (Reply 9):

As mentioned before it is the airlines who brings home the airplanes. I would pay a great deal of money to get on a flight flike this.

Hapag LLoyd offered that recently for the delivery flights of their new 738s. Was about e 2K IIRC which included the trip to SEA and Hotels etc.

Should be cheaper on FR, around € 999.99
 Smile



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineAirPacific747 From Denmark, joined May 2008, 2408 posts, RR: 24
Reply 19, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 4718 times:

Quoting Ryanair737 (Reply 13):

Didn't you forget to include Keflavik?


User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 20, posted (8 years 5 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 4718 times:

This is most curious. I checked the Flightaware link and they don't even have the FR ICAO code listed. Which means that RYR900M is listed as "Unknown owner".  Silly

User currently offlineAirblue From San Marino, joined May 2001, 1825 posts, RR: 11
Reply 21, posted (8 years 5 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 4082 times:

Usually FR delivery flights use to stop in Keflavik.

User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Reply 22, posted (8 years 5 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3941 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 17):
I wouldn't be surprised if it was close. A BBJ (737-700) did BFI/SEA-JED, which is the record flight for any 737. Did they tank this thing?

Isn´t there a great chance that this RYR bird was souped up with some ferry tanks inside the cabin for this flight? It don´t have to be per automation an ordinarilly fueled up A/C.


User currently offlineAirplanepics From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2003, 2734 posts, RR: 40
Reply 23, posted (8 years 5 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3941 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 17):
A BBJ (737-700) did BFI/SEA-JED, which is the record flight for any 737. Did they tank this thing?

Yes, this was a couple of years back now. Was N737ER, record is still to be broken!



Simon - London-Aviation.com
User currently offlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19230 posts, RR: 52
Reply 24, posted (8 years 5 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3929 times:

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 20):
RYR900M

Correct a digit and you'll be spot-on.



"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
25 Post contains images OyKIE : Hehe. Good one Are these flights announced ahead, or do you need to be aware of them?
26 HLF-MD11 : AirBerlin once flew a delivery flight nonstop from BFI to TXL - I think the longest flight for a B737-800 - approx 10 hours The HapagFly deal was just
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