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What Was Like Aeroflot During Soviet Times?  
User currently offlineYAK42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 16338 times:

I know this is the time that Aeroflot earned its unsavoury image. But apparently they had an OK safety record.
Does anyone here know what they were actually like to fly during the seventies and eighties?
What was service like? Were they reliable? What meals were served? Could you connect between flights OK? Did they lose your bags? etc..

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[Edited 2006-04-22 05:46:46]

58 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinePlanespotting From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3527 posts, RR: 5
Reply 1, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 16282 times:

I can't vouch personally for their service or safety record, but some books I have read (most notably, the book written by the MiG-29 pilot who defected in the 80's) showed Aeroflot as a cheap, relatively dependable means of travel to get around the Soviet Union.


Do you like movies about gladiators?
User currently offlineScalebuilder From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 16254 times:

I have flown with Aeroflot on shorter flights in Europe. I have always found them perfectly acceptable. Always felt safe and well taken care of. This was 20 years back in time.

My former boss once flew with Aeroflot on a charter back in the 70's. Just before landing when all the meal trays were collected and all the trash was disposed of, it was discovered by the crew that two pieces of real silverware were unaccounted for. The concern for these missing pieces was so great that all of the passengers got involved in the search until they were found. My former boss suspected that the cabin crew would be held liable for anything that would be missing or unaccounted for at the end of the flight.


User currently offlineSFOMEX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 16237 times:

I've never flown them, but I remember that during the years they came to MEX, they were one of the cheapest ways to go to Europe. Maybe somebody could confirm this.

User currently offlineYAK42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 16202 times:

Quoting Scalebuilder (Reply 2):
, it was discovered by the crew that two pieces of real silverware were unaccounted for. The concern for these missing pieces was so great that all of the passengers got involved in the search until they were found.

Suppose you shouldnt provide silverware on flights if your not prepared to lose bits of it.


User currently offlineAeroflot777 From Russia, joined Mar 2004, 3007 posts, RR: 27
Reply 5, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 16149 times:

Aeroflot was by far the world's largest airline back them. This is because Aeroflot literally means "air fleet". Because there was never any competition in the Soviet Union, every single flying aircraft was operating under Aeroflot titles. Therefore the fleet, consisting of thousands of aircraft, ranged from little 2 passenger crop dusters to large passenger aircraft. Each region of Russia had it's main airport. Because of this it could be said that Aeroflot had many hubs. For instance, Moscow was in charge of the Moscow division of Aeroflot. Leningrad had its own Aeroflot division, as did many other airports nation-wide. Because of the vast variety of aircraft, Aeroflot planes served thousands of airports and airfields around the nation. Many aircraft were even made to land on unpaved surfaces, thus increasing the number of destinations Aeroflot flew into. The service was normal. The FA's did their job. Aeroflot planes were safe, and performed well. Soviet citizens always flew Aeroflot because there was no alternative, nor were they looking for any either. Aeroflot got them where they wanted to go, and that was that. Prices were cheap and service was reliable. No one was looking for anything else. Bottom line is that the Soviets were proud of Aeroflot, and the Russians are proud of them now!


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User currently offlineCedars747 From Norway, joined Dec 2005, 2721 posts, RR: 19
Reply 6, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 16043 times:

I flew SU IL-62 in 1994 ,i was surprised by their excellent service and comfortable airplanes......far better than many western airlines.
Alex!!!

[Edited 2006-04-22 10:05:39]


Tengo una pasion por la aviacion !لدي شغف للطيران !I have a passion for aviation !
User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 7, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 15972 times:

Quoting Aeroflot777 (Reply 5):
Aeroflot was by far the world's largest airline back them. This is because Aeroflot literally means "air fleet". Because there was never any competition in the Soviet Union, every single flying aircraft was operating under Aeroflot titles. Therefore the fleet, consisting of thousands of aircraft, ranged from little 2 passenger crop dusters to large passenger aircraft. Each region of Russia had it's main airport. Because of this it could be said that Aeroflot had many hubs. For instance, Moscow was in charge of the Moscow division of Aeroflot. Leningrad had its own Aeroflot division, as did many other airports nation-wide. Because of the vast variety of aircraft, Aeroflot planes served thousands of airports and airfields around the nation. Many aircraft were even made to land on unpaved surfaces, thus increasing the number of destinations Aeroflot flew into. The service was normal. The FA's did their job. Aeroflot planes were safe, and performed well. Soviet citizens always flew Aeroflot because there was no alternative, nor were they looking for any either. Aeroflot got them where they wanted to go, and that was that. Prices were cheap and service was reliable. No one was looking for anything else. Bottom line is that the Soviets were proud of Aeroflot, and the Russians are proud of them now!

It would then be like what I heard was the case, that is that SU had internally different names. The Leningrad division was Aeroflot Pulkovo, the Moscow division was separated between Aeroflot Sheremetyevo and Aeroflot Domodedovo. Isn't the current SU what used to be Aeroflot Sheremetyevo because they're based almost exclusively in SVO? Please correct me if I'm wrong.


User currently offlineFeroze From India, joined Dec 2004, 794 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 15954 times:

I flew LHR-SVO-CCU back in 1991. I had to fly at very short notice and SU's was the cheapest fare available. Heathrow to Sheremtyevo was fine, it was the long haul from there to Calcutta (as was) that was the painful bit. The seven hour transit didn't help either.

Service was non-existent on the plane; not one smile emanated from the cabin crew and the food was just plain awful. Try explaining that one of my co-passengers was vegetarian and language became a huge barrier! In addition, the aircraft made a stop in Sharjah which we had not been told about. I think it was just a tech stop, but if you look at the Circle Mapper, SHJ is a little out of the way! It was after this trip that I resolved not to fly SU again - they've stopped the route now anyway.

It could have been worse: at the time SU also had a flight scheduled SVO-TAS-KHI-CCU.

On a side note, it is interesting that the fare in 1991 was £415. In 2006, one can get a flight for around the same amount, non-stop, on an airline with great service. Isn't competition great?!


Regards,

Feroze


User currently offlineMOW From Israel, joined Dec 2005, 192 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 15938 times:

Here is what I remember about the times when SU was the biggest airline in the world.

I cannot agree that prices were cheap. For example, KHV-MOW one-way (8 hours flying time) was about 125 RUB which meant almost a monthly salary of each of my parent back then (civil job). Flying was heavily subsidised for many Soviets. For example, Soviet social security system entitled many to spend one month at a Black Sea resort with 90% discount which included air travel as well - once every two to three years.

I was flying a lot with my parents when I was a kid. I liked it very much. Ilyushins, tupolevs... Simply exciting! Of course, irregularities happened - mostly flight delays which meant some overnights at airports if my parents could not get an airport hotel room. I do not remember even a single case of baggage loss, though. Inflight catering was OK - all passengers were served with chicken and rice - "chicken a la Aeroflot" as it was always known. Some trunk lines had flights like SU 25/26 MOW-KHV which had a bit better catering with caviar and alcoholic drinks onboard. MOW-KHV was served by up to 10 dailies during peak times of the year, but in order to get tickets to that coveted 25/26 flight you had to have connections in Aeroflot (= airline / airport / ticket office / corresponding department in local government).

I remember clearly one particular inflight announcement back then. It forbid use of all photo and motion picture equipment onboard. Surely it was supposed to protect secret objects of soviet defence system from being photographed while overflown. Everybody thought it was ridiculous, because everybody knew that American surveillance satellites were able to capture even the smallest objects on the earth with great detail.

Connections did not exist. You simply had to wait with all your baggage for the next flight at transit airport. In MOW you had to transfer from one airport to another, because MOW airports were serving different line groups - DME - all long hauls to Siberia / Far East and Middle East, VKO - southern destinations (including Black Sea resort towns), SVO - northwest in addition to international destinations. Now defunct Bykovo airport served Ukraine and some short hauls. At least I flew to UA a couple of times from that airport.

Want to know anything else about soviet Aeroflot? Just ask me, I'll be glad to share with you my memories.


User currently offlineSFO2SVO From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 399 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 15921 times:

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 7):
It would then be like what I heard was the case, that is that SU had internally different names. The Leningrad division was Aeroflot Pulkovo, the Moscow division was separated between Aeroflot Sheremetyevo and Aeroflot Domodedovo. Isn't the current SU what used to be Aeroflot Sheremetyevo because they're based almost exclusively in SVO? Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Not during Soviet times. "Pulkovo", "Samara", etc were born after Aeroflot split in the beginning of 90s.



318-19-20-21 332 343 717 727 737-234578 743-4 752 763 772 D9/10 M11/8x/90 F70 RJ85 ATR72 SF340 E120 TU34/54 IL18/62/86/9
User currently offlineAirAmericaC46 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 590 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 15758 times:

Anybody knows sample routings of each aircraft types of Aeroflot and year or decade of service? Thanks for the info.

User currently offlineLumberton From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 4708 posts, RR: 20
Reply 12, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 15657 times:

Well I hate to put a damper on all the adulation, but as for safety, their record wasn't all that great in the "glory" days of the Soviet Union:

Quote:
The AirDisaster.com Accident Data reports that since 1953 there have been 127 accidents involving Aeroflot aircraft and 6875 fatalities (plus 20 people killed on the ground). There have been no fatal accidents since 23 March 1994 (when 75 people were killed after an Aeroflot Airbus crashed in Siberia after the pilot allowed his 15-year-old son to take the controls (see Aeroflot Flight 593)). Since the early 1990s Aeroflot has considerably improved its safety record (see "A Face Lift for Down-at-Heel Aeroflot", New York Times, 7 April 2003).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeroflot

Aeroflot is a much safer airline these days.



"When all is said and done, more will be said than done".
User currently offline3MilesToWRO From Poland, joined Mar 2006, 280 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 15619 times:

Quoting MOW (Reply 9):
I cannot agree that prices were cheap. For example, KHV-MOW one-way (8 hours flying time) was about 125 RUB which meant almost a monthly salary of each of my parent back then (civil job). Flying was heavily subsidised for many Soviets.

For us flying was expensive, for others cheap. It's a matter of currency (ant total economy) relations, mostly east-west, that were quite diferent those times than now.

One of my friends who begun studying in Leningrad and ended in Petersburg  Wink told me, that when he was coming back home to Gliwice, he paid less for the plane Leningrad-Warsaw than for two hours in train from Warsaw to Gliwice  Smile


User currently offlineMOW From Israel, joined Dec 2005, 192 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 15601 times:

Quoting AirAmericaC46 (Reply 11):
Anybody knows sample routings of each aircraft types of Aeroflot and year or decade of service? Thanks for the info.

Domestically, Ilyushin-62 and Ilyushin-62M were flying on the Far Eastern long-hauls - KHV, PKC and VVO among others. It's first revenue flight dates back to 1967. You can still get a chance to fly one with Domodedovo airlines, Dalavia or KrasAir.


User currently offlineAdriaticus From Mexico, joined May 2004, 1137 posts, RR: 19
Reply 15, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 15505 times:

I guess you cannot issue one opinion, as I found the service to be not standardized at all, ranging from the best to the worst in a single airline... I had the distinct and interesting pleasure to fly SU back in 1991 on a 31,616 Km- trip involving 13 different legs... MEX-HAV-SNN-SVO / DME-SKD-TAS-TBS-SIP-KBP-LED-SVO / SVO-SNN-HAV-MEX.

On this periple I got to fly from Yak-40, Tu 134, TU 154, IL-62 to IL-96.

Services (which was the original question) ranged from exquisite food, including caviar and discretionary booze crossing the pond on a IL62, to the technical marvel of boarding a brand-new IL96 from the ground to a hall in the belly and on to the main cabin by an internal staircase, to crappy cold "chicken á la Aerflot" hurled at us inside plastic bags at 4AM by a disgruntled f/a on board a crowded TU154 with a broken, overflooded toilet which smelled like hell, to a cold walk on a freezing apron at DME at 2AM...

Bags were never lost. All in all, it was a very interesting and fun set of flights... I guess all of that now belongs to the past...

__Ad.


SKD - Samarkand
TAS - Tashkent
TBS - Tbilisi
SIP - Simferopol
KBP - Kiev



A300/18/19/20/21 B721/2 B732/3/G/8 B741/2/4 B752 B762/3/4 B772/3 DC8/9/10 MD11 TU134/154 IL62/86 An24 SA340/2000 E45/90
User currently offlineKomododx From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 15505 times:

What's up with the KLM/Aeroflot aircraft? Never seen anything like that! Can anyone fill me in?

Stefano  wave 


User currently offlineYAK42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 15436 times:

Quoting Komododx (Reply 16):
What's up with the KLM/Aeroflot aircraft? Never seen anything like that! Can anyone fill me in?

Looks like some early form of code share.


User currently onlineScorpio From Belgium, joined Oct 2001, 5028 posts, RR: 44
Reply 18, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 15099 times:

Quoting Lumberton (Reply 12):
Well I hate to put a damper on all the adulation, but as for safety, their record wasn't all that great in the "glory" days of the Soviet Union:

Taking the enrmous size of Aeroflot into mind (they had literally thousands of aircraft), 127 accidents in 40 years doesn't seem all that bad...


User currently offlineYAK42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Reply 19, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 14998 times:

Quoting Scorpio (Reply 18):
Taking the enrmous size of Aeroflot into mind (they had literally thousands of aircraft), 127 accidents in 40 years doesn't seem all that bad...

Yes, event though there were these accidents you have to take into account that around a fifth of the worlds flights were Aeroflot.


User currently offlineChiGB1973 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 1615 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 14746 times:

I was playing an old Trivial Pursuit game. One question is the largest airline in the world. Aeroflot. I was quite surprise and came home and read up on it a little.

This was the original Trivial Pursuit, the blue one. Interesting to me, to say the least.

M


User currently offlineAn-225 From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 3950 posts, RR: 40
Reply 21, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 14723 times:

I've flown Aeroflot since I was 6 months old up until 1990. Every year my family would go to Ukraine, and most of the time we'd go to Bykovo and catch one of Aeroflot's An-24s for a 2 hour hop to Zhitomir (anyone have the code?). I remember the planes having that distinct smell and An-24s were very loud. I've also flown An-2, Tu-154 and IL-86 and always enjoyed every second of the flight. I also remember boarding IL-86 from the ground via the special stairs and leaving carryon baggage on the first level. As for checked bags, we never had a problem getting them back.

I'd gladly pay for my tickets on Aeroflot again.

Alex.



Money does not bring you happiness. But it's better to cry in your own private limo than on a cold bus stop.
User currently offlineAeroflot777 From Russia, joined Mar 2004, 3007 posts, RR: 27
Reply 22, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 14723 times:

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 7):
It would then be like what I heard was the case, that is that SU had internally different names. The Leningrad division was Aeroflot Pulkovo, the Moscow division was separated between Aeroflot Sheremetyevo and Aeroflot Domodedovo. Isn't the current SU what used to be Aeroflot Sheremetyevo because they're based almost exclusively in SVO? Please correct me if I'm wrong.
You are right. That's is exactly what I meant. The main airports of the region were in charge of the division. Thus you were right Aeroflot Pulkovo was based in Leningrad, Aeroflot Sheremetyevo - in Moscow. And the Aeroflot that exists now is indeed the leftover of Aeroflot Sheremetyevo. The rest of the Aeroflot based around the nation turned into separate airlines i.e. Pulkovo, Kras Air, Samarskie Avialinii. That is the reason why most post-Soviet airlines have the same color scheme with one blue line across the fuselage. It's all because it used to be Aeroflot and they never bothered to change it, they just changed the titles.

Quoting SFO2SVO (Reply 10):
Not during Soviet times. "Pulkovo", "Samara", etc were born after Aeroflot split in the beginning of 90s.
Aeroflot Pulkovo and Aeroflot Samara did exist, they were names of the Aeroflot divisions and crew bases.

Quoting Lumberton (Reply 12):
Aeroflot is a much safer airline these days.
Again, take into account the number of aircraft Aeroflot had. Absolutely every flying a/c was Aeroflot. So when you are talking about fatalities and accidents you are also taking into account every single little crop duster and field plane as well as majors. So when you have a fleet of many thousands of aircraft, 6875 fatalities is not that much. And also please keep into account that the accident in March of 1994 was not operated by Aeroflot! It's a common misconception. I have read in numerous Russian aviation magazines that the aircraft was rented for a charter. It was the aircraft that had the experimental Aeroflot colors on it.

Aeroflot777

[Edited 2006-04-22 18:48:50]

User currently offlineCs03 From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 413 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 14305 times:
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During the summer of 1979, while on a school trip to the USSR, we used Aeroflot for 8 flights within the country. We used: AN-26, TU 134,TU154, and a long trip from Samarkand to MOW on a IL 18. The in flight meal on this 7 hour trip was a cup of warm mineral water! One real "treat", was waiting to board our aircraft at DME. We waited under the wing, as it was raining!

User currently offlineOV735 From Estonia, joined Jan 2004, 909 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 14305 times:

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 7):
It would then be like what I heard was the case, that is that SU had internally different names. The Leningrad division was Aeroflot Pulkovo, the Moscow division was separated between Aeroflot Sheremetyevo and Aeroflot Domodedovo. Isn't the current SU what used to be Aeroflot Sheremetyevo because they're based almost exclusively in SVO? Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Basically, this is true. However, the names of these units were mostly [put region name here] Civil Aviation Directorates, which were divided into Air Detatchments, which in turn were divided into Flights, with each flight operating a certain type of aircraft (sometimes two types or even three). For example, there was Latvian Civil Aviation Directorate, which was based in the then-Latvian SSR. Riga Air Detatchment operated flights out of Riga's airport, and the 280th Flight operated Tupolev Tu-134 aircraft.

Now, there were such directorates in each of the Soviet Republics, and several in Russian SSR. Each was responsible for covering their region with civil air services, and linking the main city(cities) in the region to the main cities of other regions. Sometimes there was even a little competition between the directorates - although minimal, as the units could not manipulate with ticket prices or service levels.

The present day Aeroflot is mostly based on the former Central Directorate of International Sercives, which was indeed based in Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport and operated the majority of flights to and from outside the USSR. Some other directorates, however, operated international services too, though only to the other Warsaw Pact countries, as far as I know. These included the Leningrad and Ukrainian CAD, to name a few.

Now, the name Aeroflot itself was tied to the directorates quite loosely. Basically, as it has been pointed out above, the word itself means 'air fleet', and thus every civil aircraft (and many military ones, too) were painted with those titles. Of course it said so on all the tickets too.

So, basically, Aeroflot itself wasn't an airline per se, but rather a name under which several organisations flew.

Cheers,
OV735


25 Vimanav : Hello Feroze In those days SU operated TU154s (on day 4 if I recall correctly) coming into CCU on scheduled flights. These aircraft did not have the r
26 Boeing727flyer : I flew with them on the TU-134 AND TU-154 and I loved it. Service was good and I felt safe.
27 AR385 : I have never heard that before. Would you mind sourcing your statement? Where did the crew come from? and who chartered this aircraft? I thought it w
28 Smokescreen : What was their commercial aviation fleet size at it's peak?
29 Congaboy : I flew on SU from SVO to AMS...the service was an IL62, with training wheel and all. The plane was, well, spartan in terms of decor, the flight crew w
30 OV735 : Well, first off, there was nothing commercial about their fleet. But for the size, here's my calculation: around 15 000 An-2 around 1 000 An-24 aroun
31 Tmarch291 : Did Aeroflot have 1st class during the Soviet times? Seems a bit against their idealogy.
32 Post contains links BoomBoom : I never flew Aeroflot, but I remember when this article appeard in the newspaper, Here are some select highlights: http://www.aeroflot.aero/eng/news.a
33 Zvezda : The word in Russian for a male vegetarian is вегетарианец (vegetarianets). The American spy satellites flew in
34 RIXrat : OK, time to check in. As an American journalist stationed in at that time Leningrad, USSR, (1976-78) my beat was the western slice of the Soviet Union
35 OV735 : As far as I know, they did on international services. On domestic services, though, there was only economy (or tourist) class. But of course the lowe
36 474218 : Remember they were Communists so all people were treated the same. The Communist manifesto: "From each according to his ability, to each according to
37 EALflyer : I flew an Il-62 from Hamburg to Leningrad in 1984, overnighted (connecting flight??) at the Pribaltiskaya Hotel, and then flew a Tu-134 to Riga (RIX)
38 BA84 : I flew Aeroflot many times during the 1980's. Mostly domestic, from Moscow to Leningrad, Tallinn, Simferopal. International to Frankfurt and Helsinki.
39 Braybuddy : Aeroflot was an experience. I flew on an Il-86 from Shannon to Havana in 1991 (this would have been post-communist) and all the cabin crew disappeared
40 RIXrat : Oh yes, I forgot to add something to my already long post. When I was stationed in the Soviet Union my Russian government appointed assistant usually
41 YAK42 : I am pretty surprised with the amount of north Americans who have had experience of Aeroflot. I would have thought it would mostly be Europeans east a
42 Aeroflot777 : What are you talking about? Did I miss something? Aeroflot777
43 BA84 : KLM was my usual carrier YVR-SVO. I insisted to the KLM phone agent (no internet then) no segments on SU. It was always a KLM DC-9 AMS-SVO. Once made
44 Post contains links and images YAK42 : View Large View Medium Photo © George W. Hamlin[Edited 2006-04-22 22:35:27]
45 Saturn5 : and also no emergency oxygen built into the aircraft - they just had portable oxygen bottles.
46 SR100 : This was the time, Western European airlines were not allowed to use the shortest route from Europe to Japan over the Soviet Union. They had to fly e
47 TakeOff : There are some really fascinating answers and insights on this post. A couple of questions: How hard was it to get a job as cockpit crew or a flight a
48 BA747YYZ : I have made fun of them so much I can not give you a saerious opinion. But my uncle who has flwon them many times, both pre and post USSR, said he wou
49 Spartanmjf : I had a chance to fly them from CPH to Leningrad, Moscow to Leningrad, and Leningrad to CPH over ten days in 1988. The flights were all on TU154 aircr
50 Saturn5 : Most likely but someone may correct me. Flying in USSR was like flying a military aircraft - by definiton the whole airspace in Russia (even today) i
51 Cedarjet : The Tu144 had F and Y - four abreast (two and two) in First and five abreast (three and two) in Economy (maybe down to two and two at the back). Not
52 A999 : According to Aeroflot winter 93/94 timetable the only CCU flight is listed as SU537 SVO-SHJ-CCU TU154 CY day 4 The only Hanoi flights were SU541 SVO-A
53 Sovietjet : Hey RIX didn't you fly on a Tu-144? My grandpa flew Soviet Aeroflot many times between SOF and Moscow. He flew on Tu-104s, 124s, 134s, 154s, Il-18. He
54 Turpentyine : Ye I am also curious if anyone flew the TU-144, and what was that like?
55 Zvezda : Connections mattered for getting everything other than bread, potatoes, and vodka. No. I'm not sure what you mean by "special". They were vetted.
56 Post contains images OV735 : True indeed. There was a special flight academy in Moscow, where most of the cockpit crew came from. Some, of course, were of military background, to
57 Post contains images Tu204 : It was about as difficult as it is today, so the answer is not really. You did not have to be a member of the communist party but it would score you
58 RedChili : The name "Aeroflot - Russian International Airlines" was born at some time in the 1990s. The reason for that specific name was that Aeroflot at that
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