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Emergency Slide Deployment On The Ground  
User currently offlineJdwfloyd From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 837 posts, RR: 4
Posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 7741 times:

Was leaving work at PIT tonight and noticed the emergency slide on the America West A319 inbound had deployed accidentally. It occurred at the left rear door. My question is basically how often does accidental deployment of slides occur. And, what is the general cost of re installing the slides after deployment, and how long does this process take, considering the Aircraft is suppose to fly back out in the morning. Thanks.






RJ

20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJeb94 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 598 posts, RR: 5
Reply 1, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 7692 times:

The slide gets deflated and unclipped from the aircraft, then folded up and shipped to a suitable overhaul facility. A replacement slide pack will be installed. It doesn't take very long to do provided the replacement slide is available.

User currently offlineATCme From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 304 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 7692 times:

I remember that when watching an episode of flight attendant school that they said some figure around $20 thousand. I would think that any slide deployment would be a mistake on the part of an F/A because they didn't disarm the door correctly. (Of course there is always other possiblilities, I'm just stating one, so don't flame me.)
Hope I helped
ATCme  spin 



I'm from the FAA, and I'm here to help. Really. Yes I'm serious, I'm here to help you.
User currently offlineBigJimFX From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 321 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 7675 times:

Quoting ATCme (Reply 2):
I would think that any slide deployment would be a mistake on the part of an F/A because they didn't disarm the door correctly. (Of course there is always other possiblilities, I'm just stating one, so don't flame me.)

One time, at an airline I worked at, a mechanic opened a door to a 727 before the crew could disarm the slide and was slightly injured. It happens... Just a mistake.... an expensive mistake... but it happens.



I'd like to thank me for flying Me Airways...
User currently offlineHBJZA From Switzerland, joined Jan 2006, 376 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 7642 times:

Quoting BigJimFX (Reply 3):
One time, at an airline I worked at, a mechanic opened a door to a 727 before the crew could disarm the slide and was slightly injured. It happens... Just a mistake.... an expensive mistake... but it happens.

Fair enough on a 727 but on an airbus 319, as soon as the outside door handle is pulled, the slide gets automatically disarmed. So in this case the door was opened from inside.


User currently offlineSfomb67 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 417 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 7609 times:

Probably the biggest consequence of an accidental slide deployment is the possibility of cancelling a flight because a replacement slide is not available at that station. Slides are expensive, therefor not readily available at every station, and one might have to be flown in for replacement.


Not as easy as originally perceived
User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4770 posts, RR: 26
Reply 6, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 7562 times:
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Quoting Sfomb67 (Reply 5):
Probably the biggest consequence of an accidental slide deployment is the possibility of cancelling a flight

Wrong. The biggest consequence would be serious injury, possibly death caused by accidental deployment. If a provisioner is not careful and alert and a slide is deployed, it can and probably will push them right off the truck/stand.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineMarkHKG From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 960 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 7551 times:

Also to note is that some aircraft are more prone to accidential slide deployment than others due to the door design.

For instance, most people will know that something is not "usual" when opening a non-power/emergency assist door like the B737 or B727 as there is an increased weight on the door when you try to push it open. (The slide bustle is attached to the girt bar, after all.)

Other times, the "slide armed" indication may not be very clear (like the B767 whose yellow placard can be broken off, and the inboard/outboard arming mechanism can be hard to identify at a quick glance) and thus prevent the busy flight attendant from realizing that the door was in fact armed.

If the flight attendant realizes that they have accidentally opened the door, several doors are more forgiving than others. The Airbus 319/320/321 series have a "slide armed" white light that illuminates, giving you just a couple of moments to close the door handle before the power assist engages. (thereby preventing the deployment.) But heaven help you if you open the B767 door when it is armed as it is a rather "committed" system...

Quoting BigJimFX (Reply 3):
One time, at an airline I worked at, a mechanic opened a door to a 727 before the crew could disarm the slide and was slightly injured. It happens... Just a mistake.... an expensive mistake... but it happens.

With the bigger slides (e.g. B747 or MD-11) a mistake like that could potentially kill someone...thankfully these large slides were built in the era of "user friendly" doors so they do disarm from the outside. Interestingly, the FAA issued an alert about the new EMB170/190 series aircraft...apparently you can defeat the disarm-from-the-outside feature by holding the vent hole open. (DON'T DO IT!)  Wink



Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 3980 posts, RR: 34
Reply 8, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 7401 times:

Quoting MarkHKG (Reply 7):
like the B767 whose yellow placard can be broken off, and the inboard/outboard arming mechanism can be hard to identify at a quick glance

Yes the arm/disarm lever, and the door open lever both operate in the same sense. Our airline now says that two f/a must disarm the B767 doors to check each other.


User currently offlineBridogger6 From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 710 posts, RR: 10
Reply 9, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 7385 times:

It's funny now.. that makes two times this year. I think that the flight attendants at HP were going about two years without an accidental slide deployment. It just so happens that a flight I was working a couple of weeks ago going to ORD (already on a two hour ATC delay) had a case where a flight attendant opened door 2L to get some air without disarming the slide first. The slide deployed. The actual replacement of the slide took only about 20-30 minutes... but then some things went wrong when they went to test it. The test itself wasn't running properly so THAT had to be fixed. Resulted in a 3.5-4 hour delay including the delay caused by ATC.

The slide does cost around $20,000 to replace... pretty expensive. Flight attendants who do this are automatically given a drug test and I think something like three months suspension. From my understanding, the fligh attendant who did this was pretty senior... but we all make mistakes sometimes.


User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 3980 posts, RR: 34
Reply 10, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 7368 times:

Quoting Bridogger6 (Reply 9):
flight attendant opened door 2L to get some air without disarming the slide first

A lot can be done with everyone following good procedure.
Flight deck calling doors to manual turning onto the stand. Cabin crew actioning and cross checking. Checking the Eicas display (if fitted) that doors are in manual. On aircraft with auto disengage, opening the doors only from the outside.
It goes wrong when the doors are placed in automatic on departure, then something happens. The aircraft returns to the gate, or the dispatcher needs the door reopened.
Re the above case, we have a rule that a cabin door will NEVER be opened unless ground equipment is in place. At least then the slide will fall harmlessly onto the steps or catering vehicle.
Yes the aircraft get hot in the summer, but the rule is religiuosly appplied.


User currently offlineIAHcsr From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 3404 posts, RR: 42
Reply 11, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 7344 times:
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Years ago, when CO still had 747s, I was meeting a flight and the FA opened the door instead of giving the  thumbsup  for me to open it. The slide was still armed... Fortunately, the slide must drop down from the door to trip. It just went 'THUD' on the jetway floor .... Not that I noticed immediately .. I was kinda busy running the other way....


Working very hard to Fly Right....
User currently offlineFlyingColours From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2315 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 7320 times:

Quoting MarkHKG (Reply 7):
The Airbus 319/320/321 series have a "slide armed" white light that illuminates, giving you just a couple of moments to close the door handle before the power assist engages

True but at some airlines, like mine we are told to just let it go as if you are not quick enough in restowing the handle you can break the door or worse - be holding onto it as it flies open. I think the white light is really there to give you a brief second to shout something offensive before the sound of the slide inflating.

Quoting Bridogger6 (Reply 9):
From my understanding, the fligh attendant who did this was pretty senior... but we all make mistakes sometimes.

We were told it happend at our airline 3 times last year, in all cases it was senior crew who did it, and the reason - being senior. Junior crew are very on the ball with regards to the doors and usually triple check it themselves before opening one. If you spend a few years flying the same type you may start to not check the signs before opening one, although on a 757 you must be asleep to miss the so called "block of cheese" about an inch above the handle (I know I caught my hand inbetween in the cabin sim).

Phil
FlyingColours



Lifes a train racing towards you, now you can either run away or grab a chair & a beer and watch it come - Phil
User currently offlineN405MX From Mexico, joined May 2004, 1378 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 7311 times:

Quoting Jdwfloyd (Thread starter):
My question is basically how often does accidental deployment of slides occur

Unfortunately happens more often than we think.

Quoting BigJimFX (Reply 3):
It happens... Just a mistake.... an expensive mistake... but it happens.

It is, and it´s kinda painfull (believe me).

Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 8):
Our airline now says that two f/a must disarm the B767 doors to check each other.

Cross check, in MX one f/a checks that the other has disarmed the slide.

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 6):
Wrong. The biggest consequence would be serious injury, possibly death caused by accidental deployment. If a provisioner is not careful and alert and a slide is deployed, it can and probably will push them right off the truck/stand.

Or crush you in the jetway

Quoting Bridogger6 (Reply 9):
The slide does cost around $20,000 to replace... pretty expensive. Flight attendants who do this are automatically given a drug test and I think something like three months suspension. From my understanding, the fligh attendant who did this was pretty senior... but we all make mistakes sometimes.

Heard it costs about $25,000 USD, here in Mexico the F/A gets suspended 3 months like you said, also goes back to school to take a 5 day training again in the slides.

Quoting MarkHKG (Reply 7):
If the flight attendant realizes that they have accidentally opened the door, several doors are more forgiving than others. The Airbus 319/320/321 series have a "slide armed" white light that illuminates, giving you just a couple of moments to close the door handle before the power assist engages. (thereby preventing the deployment.

It iluminates inmediatle when you move the door handle and the slide is armed, fortunately that light saved my day (or my life) as I rushed to stop the door before it opened and the slide deployed, the power assist engaged, it hits really hard.

Quoting HBJZA (Reply 4):
Fair enough on a 727 but on an airbus 319, as soon as the outside door handle is pulled, the slide gets automatically disarmed.

Also the A318 and the A320, if you open the door from the outside, the slide gets disarmed.

Cheers



Life is what happens when you have other plans.....
User currently offlineDtwclipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 7308 times:

I came close to loosing a slide at NY on a Dc-9.

Our procedure was to disarm the doors, and "crack" them to show either the gate agent or catering that it was safe for them to open the door.

I had a new agent try to open the door before I was ready, and slamed down on the lever before she could move it. I understand her hand was pretty sore.


User currently offlineChiGB1973 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 1613 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 7282 times:

Quoting ATCme (Reply 2):
I remember that when watching an episode of flight attendant school that they said some figure around $20 thousand. I would think that any slide deployment would be a mistake on the part of an F/A because they didn't disarm the door correctly. (Of course there is always other possibilities, I'm just stating one, so don't flame me.)

I think they include lost time, lost revenue and replacement of the slide, crew and all that is involved. TZ would have 757 slides blown too often and it was a very big deal. As stated for other aircraft, the 757 door opened from the outside is supposed to disarm the door. Problems came in to play at many places all over the world that would not open the door from the outside. In any case, the doors are supposed to be cross-checked, but I would have whomever was standing there check it and recheck it myself. It is just too much paperwork, trouble, retraining and cost, plus I did not want to be asked a million times about it.

M


User currently offline777WT From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 875 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 7225 times:

Quoting MarkHKG (Reply 7):
Interestingly, the FAA issued an alert about the new EMB170/190 series aircraft...apparently you can defeat the disarm-from-the-outside feature by holding the vent hole open. (DON'T DO IT!)

Interesting, what's the prodecure for disarming the slide before opening the doors from inside/outside?


User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 3980 posts, RR: 34
Reply 17, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 7186 times:

Quoting N405MX (Reply 13):
Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 8):
Our airline now says that two f/a must disarm the B767 doors to check each other.

Cross check, in MX one f/a checks that the other has disarmed the slide.

What I meant was that because the disarm lever and the open lever both open upwards, one f/a puts their hand on the disarm lever, and the other checks that it is the disarm lever before they disarm.
Only on B767, on others its crosscheck.


User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6130 posts, RR: 30
Reply 18, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 7121 times:
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At MEX last year, some nut-case on LH opened the upper deck door when the 744 was taxying for takeoff. The slide, of course inflated. It was a pain in the neck, getting the fire trucks back to their garage, arresting the passenger, removing the slide, getting the aircraft back to the gate, removing the passengers and finding a new slide so the aircraft would be legal to fly. Fortunately, Air France volunteered one and the LH plane was able to leave, finally after more than a 4 hour delay.


MGGS
User currently offlineMarkHKG From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 960 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 7070 times:

Quoting 777WT (Reply 16):
Interesting, what's the prodecure for disarming the slide before opening the doors from inside/outside?

The FAA Alert is here : http://www.faa.gov/airports_airtraff...fety/certalerts/media/cert0603.pdf

(Just make sure the vent flap is closed...)



Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
User currently offlineN405MX From Mexico, joined May 2004, 1378 posts, RR: 10
Reply 20, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 6945 times:

Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 17):
What I meant was that because the disarm lever and the open lever both open upwards, one f/a puts their hand on the disarm lever, and the other checks that it is the disarm lever before they disarm.
Only on B767, on others its crosscheck.

Also the A318/19/20, both levers move upwards, sorry if I got confused.

Saludos



Life is what happens when you have other plans.....
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