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Exit Row Seating- What A Joke  
User currently offlineItsjustme From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2808 posts, RR: 9
Posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 15507 times:

Time for a little rant, bear with me. I just returned from a flight on Continental Airlines (sorry, I'm just a regular schmoe and I don't know the codes for the different airlines) from IAH to LAX. As is my usual practice, I arrived early at IAH in hopes of scoring an exit row seat (I'm an LEO but if I'm not carrying a firearm, I just go through the usual procedure). I do this because I'm confident in my ability to help with the evacuation if necessary and the additional leg room is nice. My early arrival paid off and I was able to change my assignment to exit row. Unlike most others who end up in the exit row, I take the added responsibility seriously and, believe it or not, I actually read the card that outlines the emergency procedures for the particular type of aircraft I am on. They're typically the same except for what to do with the door once it's been removed (by the way, why the different procedures? Chuck the door outside or lay it on the seat). On past flights, an FA has taken the time to separately address those of us in the exit row either prior to or after he/she has done the usual pre-flight safety instructions. That wasn't the case on this flight. I was on a 757 and of the 6 passengers in my row, three of them were women who were easily in their late 60's or early 70's and one was a man who was a good 75 pounds over weight. Also, when the FA's came through with the beverage cart, when one of the women was asked what she'd like to drink, she didn't speak English. The FA had to hold up each item until she pointed to the one she wanted. Now, I could swear I was on a Southwest flight a couple of years ago and not only did the FA on that flight go over the instructions with our row but we had to make eye contact with her and give a verbal "yes" when asked if we were able to fulfill the responsibilities of sitting in the exit row. I remember one male passenger just nodded but she said words to the effect, "I need a verbal yes so I know you understand English". Was she overstepping the guidelines or has something changed?

At the end my IAH-LAX flight, as we were landing at LAX, the FA who had spoken to the non-English speaking woman happened to be seated directly in front of me, facing me. I motioned him to lean forward and told him I thought it was a requirement that those sitting in exit row had to speak the language the carrier uses (which is the actual verbiage on the procedure card). He said no, adding, "We've talked about this in our meetings but as long as they are able to understand hand movements, that's good enough". I just shook my head and he said something like, "I know..." but then stopped, I assume, because he didn't want to say anything non-pc.
So, my point here is are the airlines merely complying with some FAA requirement that a body, regardless if it's an able body, fill the seats in exit row without caring if the person is truly able to assist in the event of an emergency? I realize that during their pre-flight instructions to the passengers, when going over the safety procedures the FA says something like "If you're in an exit row seat and are not able to.....see a flight attendant for a different seating assignment" but I have never seen anyone who, like the non-English speaking senior citizen or the obese man who would obviously be of little if any use in assisting passengers in an emergency, ask an attendant for a different seat. It's my not intent to bash senior citizens or those who have weight issues but why do the airlines (and the FAA?) go through the motions of taking exit row seating seriously if, in the end, pretty much anyone with a pulse is allowed to occupy those seats?

83 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBobster2 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 15428 times:

I had an exit row window seat on TWA and the guy in the aisle seat was drunk, a loud, happy, obnoxious, drunk. It actually didn't bother me until the beverage service when the F/A served him two alcoholic drinks. The F/A had to know he was drunk, he was the most obvious drunk I've ever seen in my life. It was only a 45 minute flight. As I was getting off I told the captain that the F/A served alcohol to a drunk in the exit row. He just looked at with at me with a blank expression, as if he didn't care. Of course, I knew he wouldn't comment in public, but I hoped he would do something in private. Sure enough, as I was waiting at the baggage carousel, the F/A came running up to me and yelled at me for speaking to the captain. I was happy about that because it meant the captain took my complaint seriously.

User currently offlineLevg79 From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 995 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15390 times:

Quoting Itsjustme (Thread starter):
I just returned from a flight on Continental Airlines (sorry, I'm just a regular schmoe and I don't know the codes for the different airlines) from IAH to LAX.

It's interesting, but I'd assume someone with over 600 posts on this website and someone who knows the codes for IAH and LAX would have no problems remembering that the code CO.

In regards to the topic, I'm not sure what the FAA says about it, but if a person can understand hand signs as your F/A pointed out, I don't think that anyone should be descriminated against if they don't speak the language. However I might be wrong.

Leo.



A mile of runway takes you to the world. A mile of highway takes you a mile.
User currently offlineKazzie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15374 times:

When Assigning exit row seats you have to bear the passengers conditions in mind...

For example:

PAX That are/ Have, May not sit in exit rows:

Traveling with infants
under 14
Back problems
Leg problems
Arm problems
Blind
Death
Tired
Nervous flyer's
suffer from Claustrophobia....

Upon check-in, if you requires a seat the following should be asked to the PAX:

"Are you Fit and Able bodied? Any back, Arm or Knee Problems?, Are you able to react in an Emergency?" And then we hand them a card with the above conditions on, The PAX have to sign to say they are fit and do not suffer from any of the above....

The Agent at check-in May refuse the Passenger this seat if they feel they do not fit the requirements.


Either way though, All exit row seats Must be filled, so if we only have 50 passengers or so left to check in that's when the agents start offering without the passenger asking, but this is only if there is a seat Avil.

Hope this helps!


User currently offlineXXXX10 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 777 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15318 times:

Quoting Kazzie (Reply 3):
When Assigning exit row seats you have to bear the passengers conditions in mind...

For example:

PAX That are/ Have, May not sit in exit rows:

Traveling with infants
under 14
Back problems
Leg problems
Arm problems
Blind
Death
Tired
Nervous flyer's
suffer from Claustrophobia....

Do you get many dead passengers asking for exit row seats?


User currently offlineKazzie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15300 times:

Quoting XXXX10 (Reply 4):
Do you get many dead passengers asking for exit row seats?

Haha!

Sorry you'll have to excuse my spelling this evening.... quite tired!

I mean as in hearing problems  Smile

Hope thats cleared up.


User currently offlineItsjustme From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2808 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15275 times:

Quoting Levg79 (Reply 2):
It's interesting, but I'd assume someone with over 600 posts on this website and someone who knows the codes for IAH and LAX would have no problems remembering that the code CO.



Quoting Levg79 (Reply 2):

In regards to the topic, I'm not sure what the FAA says about it, but if a person can understand hand signs as your F/A pointed out, I don't think that anyone should be descriminated against if they don't speak the language. However I might be wrong.

OK, first of all, my post was directed to those who are in the business and are qualified to answer my questions. Responding with, "I don't think...and "However, I might be wrong", proves that you are neither. I wasn't asking for your opinion. Pointing out that I have "over 600 posts" and that should somehow, in your narrow mind, translate to me being able to know that CO is the code for Continental Airlines was unnecessary. If you don't have anything constructive to say and do not have the knowledge and/or training to answer the questions posted, then please do not respond.

As for your accusation that I was"descriminating" against someone for not speaking the language, that's a stretch, to say the least. This wasn't just someone seated on the plane who didn't speak or understand English. This was a person sitting in a designated area where additional (serious) responsibilites are potentially necessary. In the event of a fire on the aircraft with smoke present, her being able to understand hand signs wouldn't be of much help, would it?


User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 30
Reply 7, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15275 times:

Quoting Kazzie (Reply 3):
Death

Lets hope they are not sitting in an exit row, might be a bumpy ride  Wink I assume you ment deaf.



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineKazzie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15259 times:

Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 7):

Lets hope they are not sitting in an exit row, might be a bumpy ride Wink I assume you ment deaf.

yeh yeh

haha I need to get a dictionary  Smile


User currently offlineWarmNuts From United States of America, joined May 2006, 116 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15239 times:

Quoting Levg79 (Reply 2):
In regards to the topic, I'm not sure what the FAA says about it, but if a person can understand hand signs as your F/A pointed out, I don't think that anyone should be descriminated against if they don't speak the language. However I might be wrong.

IMO, it's not an issue of discrimination... it's an issue of minimal risk mitigation. In an emergency, it is my understanding we (the pax) are to follow -- verbatim -- the instructions as delivered by the F/A's.

If a passenger who is seated at or adjacent to an emergency exit cannot understand the instructions as delivered by the respective carrier's F/A's, then everybody's safety is put at risk.

Furthermore, according to the thread's author, the emergency procedures card explicitly stated this to be a condition of occupancy for the emergency exit row... this does not seem to be (again, IMHO) an issue of "discrimination," but rather one of policy enforcement -- a policy which exists to mitigate the risk of injury and death in case we pax have to evac the a/c. I too would have been concerned for the same reasons. Similarly, when traveling roach coach, I always select bulkhead or EE row seats (when available), for the leg room, but when seated in an EE row also take the responsibility seriously. Lastly, I think he handled the situation well, as by bringing it to the F/A's attention (and in a non-confrontational, pragmatic manner), the F/A knows that somebody noticed, and many times, that's all that's required...  Smile


User currently offlineItsjustme From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2808 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15239 times:

Quoting Kazzie (Reply 3):

Hope this helps!

It did, thank you.

So, am I to understand that the flight attendant on the Southwest flight I was on was overstepping her bounds by asking that male passenger who had first just nodded when asked if he was able and willing...., to reply with a verbal "yes"?


User currently offlineItsjustme From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2808 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15201 times:

Quoting WarmNuts (Reply 9):
Furthermore, according to the thread's author, the emergency procedures card explicitly stated this to be a condition of occupancy for the emergency exit row

It did, and that was why, well, one of the reasons anyway, that I made a point to ask the flight attendant if speaking/understanding English was a requirement for those seated in the exit row. The exact verbiage on the emergency procedures card alluded to exit row passengers were required to speak the "language of the carrier".


User currently offlineLevg79 From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 995 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 15186 times:

Itsjustme, if you get offended, none was intended.


A mile of runway takes you to the world. A mile of highway takes you a mile.
User currently offlineItsjustme From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2808 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 15139 times:

Quoting Levg79 (Reply 12):
if you get offended, none was intended.

It wasn't so much that I was offended as shocked that someone would take issue with my not knowing that CO was the code for Continental Airlines. Seemed piddly and irrelevant (pretty much like this banter is, now that I think about it  Smile). I spend very little time on this board. Of my 600+ posts, 99% of them have been on the "non-aviation" board discussing current events. As much as I enjoy flying, I felt this board was for those in the business or a place to post if one had a concern or question about flying or the airline industry. Anyway, no offense taken.


User currently offlineDeltAirlines From United States of America, joined May 1999, 8914 posts, RR: 12
Reply 14, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 15139 times:

It's an FAA requirement for them to verbally confirm that they understand the obligations.

I normally fly in the exit rows if I'm stuck in coach (mostly on RJs...only a couple of times on a mainliner in the past few months), and I've always been told that the flight attendant needed a verbal "yes", not a head nod, etc., but a verbal yes after they make sure we're aware we're in the exit row, etc.

Also, here in the states, it's not an FAA requirement to have all exit row seats occupied. On Delta, only elites can reserve (most) exit rows at the time of booking, and many people don't go through the hassle of asking at the airport, meaning that there have been several times I've been the only person in the exit rows on a plane. However, once onboard, I've seen DL F/As boot people from the exit row for being too young, requiring a seatbelt extender, having a sling on, etc. While I don't take the exit rows instruction as seriously as the original poster (I take about 30 annual CRJ segments in exit rows annually, so I do feel comfortable enough with how to operate the exit rows there, and if on a plane I don't know as well, I'll take a quick look at the diagrams on the wall).

Jeff


User currently offlineNzrich From New Zealand, joined Dec 2005, 1524 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 15086 times:

At our airline the passenger closest to the Exit must be able to speak English ..This is waived only if no one speaks English on board or do not meet the other minimum standards ..
-Must be able bodied
-Must agree to help out in a emergency
-Must be able to lift out the exit
-Must be aged 15 or over
-Must not use a extension seat belt



"Pride of the pacific"
User currently offlineGCDEG From Greece, joined Jan 2006, 352 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 15004 times:

Quoting Nzrich (Reply 15):
At our airline the passenger closest to the Exit must be able to speak English

Yup same with ours. Speaking for my airline (in the UK not US) as long as the passenger nearest the exit speaks English then it's ok for 1 person in the same row to not understand English. There must be one person minimum per exit who is fit and able bodied. Our procedures do not require a verbal yes from the passenger to confirm they are able to operate the exit however they are told verbally by the crew that they may be required to operate the exit in an emergency and must read the operation card in front of them. As for the seatbelt extension that is a bit of a grey area because if the crew member in charge of overwing exit briefs feels that the passenger requiring an extension belt can operate the exit capably and can fit out of the exit without causing an obstruction then they can be seated there. Bear in mind I'm not talking obese here. You can have someone who's fit but just have a large waist. It is a very rare occasion and have never had to give someone at the exit row an extension belt. Again it's a judgment call by the crew member on the day whether that particular person can operate the exit and fit out it. There's nothing in our manual concerning not allocating people with extension belts at the overwings just obese passengers.

If i'm in charge of briefing overwing exit passengers to make sure that they speak English I simply chat to them as they're placing their bags up to make sure they understand English.

Quoting Kazzie (Reply 3):
PAX That are/ Have, May not sit in exit rows:

To clarify who can and can't sit at overwing exits some of you may know the acronym used to help you remember the list namely - CODPIES

C - Children
O - Obese passengers
D - Deportees and Disabled (ie - blind, deaf handicapped etc)
P - Pregnant and prisoners
I - Infants on laps
E - Elderly passengers
S - Sick Passengers

Quoting Itsjustme (Thread starter):
I take the added responsibility seriously and, believe it or not, I actually read the card that outlines the emergency procedures for the particular type of aircraft I am on

Itsjustme I'm so glad there are people out there like you who do take operating exit doors seriously and IMHO I don't think the obese passenger should have been allocated the exit row at all if he was 75 pounds overweight but can't comment on the non English speaking passenger as I don't know if there was an English speaking passenger next to her.

Nick



The best thing invented - Winglets!
User currently offlineCorey07850 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2528 posts, RR: 5
Reply 17, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 14975 times:

Quoting Itsjustme (Thread starter):
(I'm an LEO but if I'm not carrying a firearm, I just go through the usual procedure). I do this because I'm confident in my ability to help with the evacuation if necessary and the additional leg room is nice.

Just curious, what's an LEO?


User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5527 posts, RR: 56
Reply 18, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 14971 times:

Quoting GCDEG (Reply 16):
To clarify who can and can't sit at overwing exits some of you may know the acronym used to help you remember the list namely - CODPIES

C - Children
O - Obese passengers
D - Deportees and Disabled (ie - blind, deaf handicapped etc)
P - Pregnant and prisoners
I - Infants on laps
E - Elderly passengers
S - Sick Passengers

That is a good one. I will be keep that one. (mind you, give you credit)

I always give a quick look to see who is sitting there. I am a pretty good gauge of "eyeing" someone up to see if they would indeed be fit/able/want to sit there.

To Itsjustme, please, by all means if you feel like we may overlooked something or feel that the people sitting there don't look/seem able to/willing to help out in an emergency, let one of us know. At least let the FSC (Flight Service Coordinator on our domestic flights/ISM (International Service Manager on our intertnational flights) know how you feel. I work for Continental and would appreciate someone telling me their concerns.



You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9835 posts, RR: 52
Reply 19, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 14892 times:

Quoting Itsjustme (Thread starter):
Now, I could swear I was on a Southwest flight a couple of years ago and not only did the FA on that flight go over the instructions with our row but we had to make eye contact with her and give a verbal "yes" when asked if we were able to fulfill the responsibilities of sitting in the exit row. I remember one male passenger just nodded but she said words to the effect, "I need a verbal yes so I know you understand English". Was she overstepping the guidelines or has something changed?

I think the technical requirement is a verbal response. So no the flight attendant was not overstepping their bounds on the Southwest flight. Some flight attendants seem a bit apathetic to the rules, but I have sat in the emergency exit rows plenty of times, and people always want to nod their head, but the I have heard plenty of flight attendants point out that they need a verbal confirmation. It makes sense. If someone is in the exit row and doesn't know what's going on, and no one can tell them, then it is a problem. That is a safety hazard. I think the Continental flight attendant was in the wrong by not requiring the exit row passengers to acknowledge with a verbal confirmation. There are reasons behind all regulations (even though some of the reasons aren't very good).

Quoting Itsjustme (Reply 6):
As for your accusation that I was"descriminating" against someone for not speaking the language, that's a stretch, to say the least.

It is ok to discriminate in some situations. I know there are some people out there that get completely bent out of shape when people discriminate, but when it is a case of safety, then it is ok to discriminate based on language. Now it is not ok based on race, but if someone does not understand English and are flying a US registered airplane, then they should not sit in the exit row.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5527 posts, RR: 56
Reply 20, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 14870 times:

Quoting Corey07850 (Reply 17):
Just curious, what's an LEO?

Law Enforcement Officer



You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineItsjustme From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2808 posts, RR: 9
Reply 21, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 14840 times:

Quoting Corey07850 (Reply 17):
Just curious, what's an LEO?

LEO = Law Enforcement Officer


User currently offlineWe're Nuts From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 5722 posts, RR: 19
Reply 22, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 14794 times:

The flight attendants are trained to do it just as the Southwest FA you described did. I've heard the new US Airways no longer does exit briefings, but when I was trained at PSA we were taught to do them, so I'm not sure what is going on there.

However whether or not the FA's actually do it is really up to them. They run a risk every time they don't do something exactly by-the-book because they never know if there is a check FA or FAA inspector onboard. Plus it's just in everyone's best interest to make sure your passengers know how to operate their exits.



Dear moderators: No.
User currently offlineCorey07850 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2528 posts, RR: 5
Reply 23, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 14783 times:

Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 20):



Quoting Itsjustme (Reply 21):

Gotcha... I was thinking it had something to do with aviation


User currently offlineItsjustme From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2808 posts, RR: 9
Reply 24, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 14777 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 19):
I think the Continental flight attendant was in the wrong by not requiring the exit row passengers to acknowledge with a verbal confirmation. There are reasons behind all regulations (even though some of the reasons aren't very good).

Actually, on this flight, the exit row passengers sitting in my area were never addressed, individually or as a group, by a flight attendant. Just like the rest of the passengers, we were told via an overhead announcement to watch the safety video about to be played on the monitors and we (all passengers) were encouraged to familiarize ourselves with the informational material that outlined safety procedures specific to the aircraft we were on. Other than that, there wasn't any exclusive interaction by any of the flight attendants and those of us sitting in my exit row.

I realize that, just as in any other profession, flight attendants can become complacent when doing the same job day in and day out and it was not my intent to fault the flight attendants on my flight. If interaction with exit row passengers is an industry requirement, I am sure it was an oversight. I just thought it was odd that a non-English speaking person, not to mention one who was obviously incapable of fullfilling the duties that exit row occupants may be asked to perform should an emergency occur, was allowed to occupy an exit row seat.


25 Ckfred : I remember flying on a UA 727-200 from ATL to ORD during the Summer Olympics. I heard one gate agent say to the other that he had 3 men traveling on C
26 BuyantUkhaa : On KL, it's the same - flying AMS-LIS a woman at the overwing exit row didn't speak English, I offered to translate to Portuguese but she didn't under
27 Hiflyer : itsjustme...heck you can call it CO or CAL depending on how old you are...grin. As far as exit row briefing in the US it only applies to overwing as l
28 WildcatYXU : [quote=Itsjustme,reply=0]and one was a man who was a good 75 pounds over weight. Dude, don't judge people by their weight. With my 6'1" and 230 pounds
29 Zippyjet : God forbid an emergency happens there would be more room if one chucks the exit door out into the great wide open. BUT like almost most things in our
30 HZ747300 : ??? I'd say the last approval rests with the flight crew. But the check-in gals should be pretty good judges of character.[Edited 2006-05-15 06:10:58
31 EWRCabincrew : When a U.S. airline gets a new aircraft to its fleet, it must prove to the FAA it can safely evacuate said plane in 90 seconds or less. Included in t
32 Itsjustme : Answered my question about "chucking" or "laying" the removed door perfectly. Thank you.
33 Bridogger6 : This isn't true... at least on the west side of the new US... gate agents can't close the door until all the exit breifings have been done, it works
34 Itsjustme : You're preaching to the choir my friend. I work with guys your size (and larger) and when responding to runs where I know there's a strong potential
35 Propman : Isn't the true exit row scandal that many airlines put a row of seats in the exit row space where obviously there should be none, to enable people to
36 MarkHKG : Also, just to add: For some carriers, they believe that it isn't easy to rotate the door and get the pax to throw it out (as far forward as possible)
37 Thegooddoctor : I think the important point that has been communicated in several responses to this statment is the fact that this is not inappropriate discriminatio
38 Jumpseat70 : The FAA has rules regarding exit row seating. No airline can overlook these rules. It's not their choice to change or alter the qualifications. Some a
39 Andz : If there is a situation requiring the overwing exits be used, the price of a door will be the least of the airline's problems. What language do you s
40 TheSorcerer : Any idea why FR have this "no under 18s in the exit row" policy? thanks Dominic
41 Post contains links FATFlyer : I'm surprised there has been no specific info about the US posted. The FAA has regulations regarding exit row seating in 14 CFR 121.585. It spells out
42 IAirAllie : As it was mentioned before in the US there is no requirement to fill the exit row seats. Many times I've worked a light load flight and the exit rows
43 Post contains images WildcatYXU : OK, i got the point Well, I'm big and fat but not so big and so fat
44 IAHAAPlatinum : Thanks for pointing this out. I'm Executive Platinum with AA, and thus fly more than I sometimes want to, and have been doing this for years. I still
45 We're Nuts : Okay, well that was something our inflight trainers told us, but they probably had bad information. It's good to know US is still doing briefings. Th
46 Post contains images WarmNuts : True that! As an AA Gold/Platinum member for over a half-decade (and a Skyteam medallion member before that), I am not ashamed whatsoever to admit th
47 Bayareapilot : I was booted out of the exit row on a CA flight once because my Putonghua wasn't up to par.
48 Red Panda : For the airline I am with, emergency row can be assigned to anyone but wheelchair pax, mother with infant, children under 12 or pax with obesity. Lang
49 Cubsrule : I've been on 2 OH flights in the past month (both CR7s, as it happens), sat in exit rows, and have not been addressed by f/as at all except for a dri
50 We're Nuts : It's bad, but crews take a lot of shortcuts that most passengers never notice.
51 Post contains images FlyingColours : Depends where the CG chart needs them to go, I did a flight the other week with 3 passengers on. A couple sat at the overwing and the other woman sat
52 IAirAllie : I meant if, as the one person posted, you have to have people sitting in the exit row what do you do on flights with only one passenger and multiple e
53 We're Nuts : There is no requirement for the exit rows to be occupied. If no one wants to sit there, no one sits there, but I'm fairly sure that has never happene
54 Cubsrule : It happens more than you might think. I've been on NW flights where the only empty seats are the exit rows. I think post-9/11, some people are really
55 Nzrich : That is why we have overwing safety briefing cards written with the most popular languages we see on board our aircraft..Also they all have pictures
56 Post contains images FlyDeltaJets : At DL (see that wasn't so hard) they ask you at the boarding door when your boarding pass is scanned and right before departure. and I have seen them
57 Post contains images ANNOYEDFA : Every airline is different some airlines require a verbal request and others a visual. Bobster2: I find your story hard to believe. If the flight atte
58 We're Nuts : If you are annoyed now, this will make you absolutely livid. FAR § 91.3a states: The pilot in command of an aircraft is directly responsible for, an
59 Nzrich : I assume what was meant was that the job to reprimand the cabin crew is usually that of the chief flight attendant ..Yes the captain is the person wh
60 Post contains images GCDEG : Totally agree with you there but what I meant in my post was they grey area is the judgment call by the crew member on the day not as to whether it w
61 TWAL1011727 : OUCH !
62 Coa747 : It isn't enough that people who sit in the exit row respond verbally to the flight attendants question as to there willingness to help in an emergency
63 Post contains images ANNOYEDFA : We're nuts: He/She is not my boss, never has been and NEVER will be. If the pilot doesn't agree with my decision I have no problem and at times have a
64 Post contains images USADreamliner : Attention AIRLINES!!!: On EXIT Rows ONLY: SKINNY PEOPLE YOUNG PEOPLE PEOPLE WHO SPEAKS ENGLISH(If you are deaf, sorry!) IF YOU ARE BLIND TOO,SORRY( ey
65 MarkHKG : Urmm...how's about... WINDOW EXITS: FOR MUSCULAR PEOPLE ONLY (Skinny people may have trouble with the weight of the door! As an incentive, the pax cou
66 Post contains images USADreamliner : Only if they are not overweight, under 55 and they speak english. Sure, No Problem. USADreamliner
67 Coa747 : Make jokes all you want but it is a serious situation. Flight attendants aren't on the plane to serve you drinks. They have one job and one job only a
68 MarkHKG : True, but I remember seeing a memo from an airline that indicated that FAA testing revealed that flashover could occur within, specifically, 90 secon
69 Coa747 : Flashover can occur before 90 seconds, it all depends on the propogation of the fire and its intensity. The 90 second rule was established based on te
70 IAirAllie : I've been an FA in the US for 5 years so I'm fully aware that the exit row can be empty my question is specifically for the UK FA who posted... You c
71 We're Nuts : Yikes, sorry lady. But FYI, Kaz keeps the UK skies safe by NOT being an FA (love you Kaz).
72 IAirAllie : OOps, sorry guy, I guess she is a PSA.
73 Itsjustme : If it means the difference between myself or a loved one getting off a plane or becoming a crispy critter, those regulations you've suggested work ju
74 ContnlEliteCMH : It's not just appropriate discrimination; it's GOOD discrimination. You wouldn't hire an FA that can't walk, fit down the aisle, or communicate with
75 We're Nuts : On the aircraft, the PIC is your boss, and if you don't follow his/her orders you are breaking a FAR. I'm all for teamwork and CRM, but someone has t
76 Post contains images MarkHKG : And for just 5 quid (pounds) extra, people will make the EXTRA effort just to get stuck in the overwing exits, requiring emergency intervention. (Coa
77 ANNOYEDFA : Not with me they don't. No one is incharge of myself BUT me.
78 We're Nuts : Then if you really are a flight attendant, you shouldn't have your wings. But with that attitude I doubt you'd make it past your first recurrent.
79 Coa747 : My apologies I meant for the testing after Manchester, this is the time in which they did smoke hood testing as well. Sometimes my typing exceeds my t
80 Andz : I guess your name should really be ANNOYINGFA. What an attitude.
81 Post contains links Tod : Emergency exit design requirements for FAA certified aircraft can be found in 14CRF25.803 thru 14CRF25.813 http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text...brow
82 Post contains images Kazzie : And?, I read it fine. yeh umm love tou to (next year im going for FA) PSA, Yes.
83 IAirAllie : Kazzie, If you take a closer look you'll notice the reading comment was not directed at you. Sorry for any missunderstanding. I can see how you could
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