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Pilot Career In Canada  
User currently offlineKerberos From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 119 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3025 times:

I've decided to persue a lifelong dream and ambition to fly for a living. I'm 32 now, and I would like to achieve my multiengine IFR commercial rating by the time I'm 35. I have the financial means to acheive this, and can make the time. I've been looking to train here: www.proifr.com

My question is this - what are my chances of success here in Canada? (Vancouver) I realize that the left seat of a 747 is most likely not going to happen, but I'd be looking to someday fly small twins - Dash-8s, twin otters etc., maybe even move up to twin jets - BizJets, RJs, or even 737s or A320s. Cargo, charter, corporate, scheduled airline, or tourist flights - I'd be happy with any of these, whatever builds my time. I'd also be interested in someday being a part time CFI.

Does my age work against me? Alot of the pilots I see when I fly look so young, and I realize that preference is given to ex-military pilots.

Would I have better chances of career success training in the US (I have US citizenship), or even in Europe?

Any thoughts or insight those of you in the industry can pass on would be much appreciated.

Peter


This is your captain speaking. I’ve turned off the no-smokin’ sign. Hell, if the plane is smokin' why can't you?
10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAirWillie6475 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 2448 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks ago) and read 3003 times:

Quoting Kerberos (Thread starter):
Would I have better chances of career success training in the US (I have US citizenship),

Jesus, how is it that every Canadian has US citizenship but I never hear any U.S citizen having citizenship in Canada. You're not too old. Although you will need to get on with an airline that has fast upgrade times because your time is running out. Air Canada Jazz has slow upgrade times so I wouldn't fly for them. If I was you I would move to the U.S and fly for regionals here. There certainly are more flying oportunities here. Plus many regionals have pilot bases in Chicago, Detroit, Clevleand meaning you could stll live in Canada and work for these U.S airlines.


User currently offlineCedarjet From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 7945 posts, RR: 54
Reply 2, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2969 times:

In Canada it's Air Canada if you want to fly a jet, or tonnes of small airlines flying Metroliners around Manitoba or whatever. Canada's like Australia, there just isn't the population to sustain two big airlines (although the Oz market actually does a better job, allowing Virgin Blue to do well alongside the monolithic QF). I saw an old picture of a Canadian International 767 at Heathrow, and thought how funny that there used to be another Canadian airline, cos for ages now it's just been Air Canada or you're walking, and I don't see that changing, unless maybe Air Transat start flights to Asia (and might also offer a decent chance of a job in the RH seat of an A310 for you sir, if TS do expand east).


fly Saha Air 707s daily from Tehran's downtown Mehrabad to Mashhad, Kish Island and Ahwaz
User currently offlineKerberos From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 119 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 2881 times:

Quoting AirWillie6475 (Reply 1):
Jesus, how is it that every Canadian has US citizenship but I never hear any U.S citizen having citizenship in Canada.

Well, I actually am an American with Canadian Citizenship. I was born in the US to an American father, and when my parents split when I was around 2, my mother took me home to Canada where I eventually got citizenship here. I grew up and have always lived here, so I'm more Canadian than American, however I travel to the US at least once a week (I live 15mins from the border), and keep my US passport.



This is your captain speaking. I’ve turned off the no-smokin’ sign. Hell, if the plane is smokin' why can't you?
User currently offlineKerberos From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 119 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 2873 times:

How about the training itself - I know this varies from school to school, and even from instructor to instructor, but generally speaking is the level of training better depending which side of the 49th parallel you're on?


This is your captain speaking. I’ve turned off the no-smokin’ sign. Hell, if the plane is smokin' why can't you?
User currently offlineCF188A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 2833 times:

Mother = American
Father = Canadian

meet on a business trip...

married

babies .... ta da

duel citizenship Smile


User currently offlineYVRtoYYZ From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 646 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2784 times:

Quoting Kerberos (Reply 4):
How about the training itself - I know this varies from school to school, and even from instructor to instructor, but generally speaking is the level of training better depending which side of the 49th parallel you're on?

I don't know about training per say, however, I have come across numerous programs here in Canada that offer full training in a time from from 6 months - 1.5 years, while others taking the normal average of 3-5 years.

Here is a website that will help you determine schools in your area.
http://schools.aviation.ca/index.php...on=com_nxtlinks&catid=59&Itemid=67

Congratulations on following your dream.

-YVRtoYYZ


User currently offlineC5onknees From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 153 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2777 times:

I would recommend coming to the U.S. and doing an accelerated training program at ATP Flight School. www.atpflightschool.com they have an Airline training program in 90 days or a self paced 10 month program. Dont be weary of the timeframe either, it's a very good school with a good placement record at the regionals (flying jets or jetprops). Look into it.. I really recommend it.

User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7637 posts, RR: 37
Reply 8, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 2700 times:

I can´t say anything about the flight training in the US. But if you are going to pursue training in Canada, ProIFR is one of the better schools on the West Coast. I did my PPL at Carson in YLW and my multi and started my CPL at Air Hart, also in YLW. Most of the schools in Canada are self paced (unless you plan on doing a University or College program) and as long as you have the financial means, can get your PPL and CPL with a multi IFR in a years time. However, your chances of getting on with carriers like AC (including Jazz), WS, or any of the bigger charters are pretty slim. Getting on with carriers flying small twins such as medivacs or freight is very possible. Getting on as a CFI is also very possible at your age.

As far as pursuing a career in Europe, 32 is pushing the limit if you want to start one of the ab initio programs with a large carrier. If you want to do it privatly there, be prepared to shell out big bucks as the training there is much more expenisve then in Canada. If you are thinking of doing your training in Canada and then trying to get a job in Europe, make sure you check out the requirments you´ll need. For example, if you have a Canadian CPL, Europe may not give you a European ticket unless you have at least 1000 hours of actual commercial experience. So be very cautious.

Best of luck to you.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlineNiagaraFlyer From Canada, joined May 2006, 49 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 2661 times:

I'm still pretty young and got a start at my flight training at a real young age with the hopes of flying commercially. I've had a few people suggest flying in the US because the industry is tough in Canada so does anyone know if it is possible? I guess what I've been looking at is dual citizenship, so what would be involved in that? Thanks for any input, it's much appreciated!

-Johnathan


User currently offlineAirWillie6475 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 2448 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 2636 times:

Quoting NiagaraFlyer (Reply 9):
I guess what I've been looking at is dual citizenship, so what would be involved in that?

Apply for citizenship and wait in line for about 10 years.


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