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Birds Hit Boeing 767 Jet, Leave Hole In Main Wing  
User currently offlineMagic48 From Switzerland, joined Jun 2005, 43 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 16256 times:

Quote:
Hokkaido International Airlines, the Sapporo-based carrier known as Air Do, said Tuesday that birds hit one of its Boeing 767 aircraft in midair Monday night, leaving a hole in one of the plane's main wings.

According to the airline, the two-engine jet, which had left Tokyo's Haneda airport, was about to land at Sapporo's New Chitose Airport around 8:45 p.m. when birds collided with its right wing, creating a hole about 30 centimeters wide.

No one was injured in the incident, but it caused Air Do to cancel a total of 15 flights between the two cities, the carrier said.

Source: http://asia.news.yahoo.com/060516/kyodo/d8hku82g0.html

43 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineA342 From Germany, joined Jul 2005, 4682 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 16131 times:

WTF ? 30 centimeters ?

Could you see through the hole, or was it just in one wing panel ? Any info on the bird species ? Could we assume that the hole is in the outer wing ?



Exceptions confirm the rule.
User currently offlineB6JFKH81 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2891 posts, RR: 7
Reply 2, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 16053 times:

Quoting A342 (Reply 1):
WTF ? 30 centimeters ?

Ah, that's nothing...should be able to fix that with a little speed tape LOL! j/k



"If you do not learn from history, you are doomed to repeat it"
User currently offlineLitz From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1765 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 15732 times:
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That's actually eerily similar in size to the big hole the foam caused in Columbia's leading edge ... speed of impact was probably similar as well.

Anyone know the species of bird? That had to be some amazing impact ...

- litz


User currently offlineBicoastal From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 15703 times:

Ummm.....uhhh....how's the bird's wing?  Sad

User currently offlineMD80fanatic From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2660 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 15703 times:

You mean to tell me there is a bird that exerts more point force than structural steel? Tell me it isnt so.  duck 

User currently offlineFlyabunch From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 517 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 15685 times:

I am sure glad it only hit the main wing and not the secondary one too!  Yeah sure

Mike


User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3408 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 15659 times:

good thing it didn't hit the Aux wing.


When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineBobster2 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 15564 times:

It has to be translation error. They must have meant 30 cm dent, not a hole.

User currently offlineDLKAPA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 15489 times:

Quoting Litz (Reply 3):
That's actually eerily similar in size to the big hole the foam caused in Columbia's leading edge ... speed of impact was probably similar as well.

If the speed of impact was the same then Columbia would have never made it out of the atmosphere. Earth's escape velocity = 11.2 km/s, or 1.12 x 10 4 m/s. The speed of a 767 flying at an altitude low enough to hit a bird is probably around 250KIAS, which works out to 0.138 km/s, or 1.38 x 10 2 m/s. Bit of a difference I think.  Wink


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 15463 times:

Some where on the net is a series of pictures of an American 767 that hit some birds while departing out of LHR I think. One bird went clean through the radome, the pressure bulkhead, through the glareshield and ended up in the Captains lap.


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6453 posts, RR: 54
Reply 11, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 15373 times:

Quoting DLKAPA (Reply 9):
If the speed of impact was the same then Columbia would have never made it out of the atmosphere. Earth's escape velocity = 11.2 km/s, or 1.12 x 10 4 m/s.

Columbia never reached Earth's escape velocity. If it had done that, then it would never have crashed, but entered an eternal orbit around the sun.

It reached Earth low orbit velocity which is some 7.9 km/s.

But the speed when the foam hit the wing was much, much lower. It happened within the atmosphere. Columbia left the atmosphere (for all practical things) going around Mach 3 which is only 0.9 km/s at high altitude.

I don't know at what speed it happened, but it could easily have been at subsonic or low supersonic speed.

But then Columbia was a lot more fragile. Flying it on top of the B747 carrier at just 250 knots though a rain shower would totally destroy the thermal protection.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2760 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 15034 times:

Quoting Bobster2 (Reply 8):
It has to be translation error. They must have meant 30 cm dent, not a hole.

Birds leave holes if they and the aircraft are going fast enough, or the bird hits in a weaker area. I've seen pictures of a Piper Seminole that had a run-in with a large bird (i think it was a turkey vulture) while in flight. The bird entered the top of the wing, and went clear through, leaving about an 24 inch diameter hole on the right wing.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
User currently offlinePenguinflies From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 988 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 14682 times:

maybe it was one of those infamous frozen chickens and a chicken cannon.

User currently offlineCRGsFuture From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 536 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 14535 times:

Can I ask, why is it so tough to comprehend a hole produced by the bird? Laws of physics could easily tell you that this was to happen if the conditions are right.


Flying you to your destination; your girlfriend to her dreams.
User currently offlineB777fan From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 171 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 14502 times:

Quoting Prebennorholm (Reply 11):
I don't know at what speed it happened, but it could easily have been at subsonic or low supersonic speed.

Not only that, but the foam was moving at the seem speed until it detached.

The relative speed at impact was even lower. I don't recall exactly, but I think the relative impact speed was in the 500 to 600 mph range. I might be low, but that is still fast enough to have caused the damage.


User currently offlineN600RR From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 171 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 14136 times:

Quoting Litz (Reply 3):
Anyone know the species of bird?



Quoting Penguinflies (Reply 13):
maybe it was one of those infamous frozen chickens and a chicken cannon

...Probably a case of that "Avian Flu" that's been all over the news recently...  sorry 



"And the fluffy white lines that the airplane leaves behind are drifting right in front of the waning of the moon" -Cake
User currently offlineCkfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5242 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 13969 times:

In 1995, a very severe thunderstorm hit DFW, and a number of AA jets were grounded, due to baseball and even larger hail damaging planes on the ground. A common problem was hail going through composite surfaces on the wings and horizontal stabilizers.

On the other hand, the DC-10s and 727s on the ground only suffered dents, since they had more metal surfaces.


User currently offlineTinkerBelle From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 13894 times:

I thought Sapporro was a Japanese beer? Mmm-good when you drop some saki bombs in it.  stirthepot 

User currently offlineTWAtwaTWA From United States of America, joined May 2006, 141 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 13634 times:

This comment relates to the above since it involves birds and planes...

I remember watching a documentary on the development of the B777, and it also featured the design and testing of the giant GE engine. There was a clip of the engine, mounted in test mode, at full power. In order to test the strength of the fanblades and ability of the engine to continue running in adverse situations, many items were chucked into the engine, including ice, small bushes, and even large (dead) birds. It was very entertaining to watch the engines easily consume multitudes of birds, while showcasing their impressive uninterupted function.

Does anyone have a weblink to this clip?

by the way, check out this amazing clip of a bird taking out a military aircraft....
http://www.yikers.com/video_bird_fly...e_causes_plane_to_malfunction.html



We're your kind of airline. Uh, I mean, We *were* your kind of airline.
User currently offline3MilesToWRO From Poland, joined Mar 2006, 280 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 13015 times:

Quoting TinkerBelle (Reply 18):
I thought Sapporro was a Japanese beer?

Never heard about. However heard about Winter Olympic Games in Sapporo. You didn't?


User currently offlineWoosie From United States of America, joined May 2006, 115 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 12732 times:

If the wing leaked fuel, then it was the main wing box.

It's very likely, though, that the bird penetrated an auxiliary structure in the wing (which is usually composite) or a slat/flap.


User currently offlineSaintsman From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 2065 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 12584 times:

Quoting MD80fanatic (Reply 5):
You mean to tell me there is a bird that exerts more point force than structural steel? Tell me it isnt so.

Type 'Bird Strike' into google images for the answer to that.


User currently offlineN160LH From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 280 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 12533 times:

Quoting Flyabunch (Reply 6):
I am sure glad it only hit the main wing and not the secondary one too



Quoting Doug_Or (Reply 7):
good thing it didn't hit the Aux wing.

I am so glad that somebody said that... main wing... hahah

-160



"I do alright up in the air, its down on the ground that I tend to mess up..."
User currently offlineStealthZ From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5697 posts, RR: 44
Reply 24, posted (8 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 11478 times:
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Quoting Saintsman (Reply 22):
Quoting MD80fanatic (Reply 5):
You mean to tell me there is a bird that exerts more point force than structural steel? Tell me it isnt so.

Type 'Bird Strike' into google images for the answer to that.

While you are there check with boeing.com and look for how much "structural steel" there is in the average B767!



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
25 Post contains links and images AmericanB763ER : Don't know if this is the incident that you mentioned but a very similiar one involving an AA 763 is to be found here I flew on N376AN in 2005 I migh
26 Bphendri : Was it a North Korean bird? You gotta watch out for those things, they are from a secret anti aircraft bird breeding laboratory.
27 Post contains images MD80fanatic : DING DING DING - We have two partial winners !!!!! Firstly, I know very well how to use Google, thank you. Secondly, I have a pretty good idea how mu
28 MotorHussy : Great headline, love it! "Leave Hole in Main Wing." as opposed to the Boeing 767's not so main wing or lesser known and carefully concealed other wing
29 StealthZ : Ah, doesn't take long for someone to bring sad day back into the story. Making a hole in the skin of a wing is hardly the same as the structural part
30 MADtoCAE : And wich one is the main wing?
31 MD80fanatic : Sorry for the tone of my last post. The other thread is wearing on me. Still though the comparison does not deserve to be glossed over and forgotten.
32 Jetflyer : Except that the 767 doesn't go into space nor has to re-enter the earth's atmosphere at thousands of miles an hour.
33 Miamiair : Had a DC-10 slat that got punctured by a bird two weeks ago. Hole was 19" X 13". Swapped the slat out at is would take too long to repair. A few bird
34 Linco22 : Big Bird from Sesame Street by the sounds of it.....
35 Dizzy8 : Do we classify this as a "near miss", a "near hit", or "loss of separation with an avian projectile?" (We'd better check those orange black boxes.)[Ed
36 HAWK21M : Presume it would be the Leading Edge Slat area. The report does not state which part of the Right wing. regds MEL
37 Post contains images MOW : Here, have a look. According to Japanese TV several birds hit the aircraft.
38 A342 : The main wing is the wing, and the other wing they could have meant is the horizontal stabilizer. End of story. ??? I'm not sure I get what you wante
39 N160LH : Thanks I was very confused... -160
40 ComeAndGo : Some migratory birds fly at cruising altitude. At 600 mph they'll do plenty of damage.
41 Bphendri : When will those darned birds ever learn RVSM!!! Just goes to show, you can't teach old birds new tricks! And it could not have been a goose, otherwise
42 PurdueAv2003 : I had this discussion with my sister, a DVM, this weekend: Why do we refer to "birds hitting the aircraft" when in reality it is the aircraft hitting
43 Scouseflyer : I remember as a teenager I was a member of the RAF cadets and on camp one year helped out at the RAF Hawk (sub-sonic jet trainer) maintenance facity i
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