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ATP Pressurized?  
User currently offlineAmerican MD-80 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (15 years 5 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 715 times:

Is the ATP pressurized? When I was reading the saftey card on a United Express ATP, it did not mention anything about oxygen masks. Also, the pilot did not mention the crusing altitude.

Colin Kumpunen

4 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineGnomon From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (15 years 5 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 712 times:

Yes, without a doubt, the ATP is pressurized, to a consistent cabin pressure of 5.5 lb/sq inch. Same as the BAe 748, interestingly enough. You can usually tell if an aircraft is pressurized by the shape of the windows: if they are rounded off, that is generally because windows with no corners (ie more circular in shape) are less subject to stress vertices during the cycles of pressurization and depressurization. Hope this helps.

User currently offlineDash8 From New Zealand, joined Aug 2005, 4 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (15 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 711 times:

This is the same as the Dash8 and I'm sure the ATR's also. For us at least there's a loophole for these kind of large commuterplanes not to have an oxygen mask at every seat. Both pilots and the purser however have oxygen masks, and 3 or 4 auxiliary bottles to aid anyone in the cockpit who needs oxygen more badly that any other person. These are stowed somewhere in the cabin.

Dash8


User currently offlineDash8 From New Zealand, joined Aug 2005, 4 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (15 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 711 times:

I meant to say the cabin, not the cockpit. Those extra bottles are for anyone who may really need it in the cabin.

Dash8


User currently offlineVIflyer From US Virgin Islands, joined May 1999, 501 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (15 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 712 times:

I don't know about the ATP but the ATRs are definately pressurized, they carry oxygen masked by the FA seat and if the case comes up that there is a sudden depressurization th FA hands them out. Most times the ATR doesn't fly high enough to require oxygen most of the time. If it is flying high enough it easier for it to come down to a altitude where oxygen is not needed.


I reject your reality and subsitute my own
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