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Define Air Rage  
User currently offlineScalebuilder From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 1852 times:

Common sense tells me what this loosely means.

But can someone crisply define this? At what point do somebody cross that line?

Also, has anybody witnessed this, and what international laws are in effect when it comes to the prosecution of offenders. Are there any agreements among countries in place?

5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineWMUPilot From United States of America, joined Jan 2003, 1473 posts, RR: 12
Reply 1, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 1837 times:

I would say it is getting abusive towards another passenger or crewmember. By abusive it could be verbal or physical. Just like road rage, only in the air.


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User currently offlineRemcor From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 358 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 1827 times:

What about at the end of that movie Meet The Parents. Would that qualify?

User currently offlineGalleyhag From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2006, 37 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 1714 times:

Air rage is defined as 'endangering the safety of an aircraft/passenger/property'. There are other instances such as Drunkeness in an aircraft, smoking in a non-smoking aircraft, and acting in a disruptive manner. This includes using threatening, abusive or insulting words towards a crew member, acting in a threatening manner or interfering with the performance of a crew member and their onboard duties. These are Air Navigation Orders (ANO) and they are there to give the Commander authority. In the airline I work for we use the term disruptive passenger rather than air rage. It is also not complying with the Commander's requests. A passenger has 2 options - compliance or non-compliance. The Tokyo Convention of 1963 is a multi-lateral treaty that deals with 'offences and certain other acts committed on board aircraft'. Jurisdiction lies with the country of registration of the aircraft. Whilst taxiing however it is under the jurisdiction of the country it is in. Once full power has been applied on the take off roll it reverts to the country of reg.

As for witnessing it, unfortunately it happens more often than people might think. On a BGI flight last week 6 'ladies' got drunk, swore at crew, threatened to open the R3 door if we didn't serve more alcohol to them and called their fellow pax some god awful names. We refused them carriage on the way home and they had to buy another ticket to get themselves back to the UK at their own expense. It won't be tolerated at all anymore thank goodness. I have been pinned up against a bulkhead, told I am going to be gang raped in an onboard toilet and called names that I didn't know existed. Sometimes by very well to do business class pax. As a 5'4'' female, it's not an enjoyable experience. However, the ANO's allow us a huge amount of authority and the police and company back us 100%. Hope that helps!


User currently offlineAsstChiefMark From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1703 times:

It's important that passengers cannot use intoxication by alcohol, illegal drugs, legal drugs, or other mind-altering substances as an excuse or defense for their behavior.

People experiencing medical emergencies should be given leniency. These emergencies may include diabetic reactions, seizures, and strokes. These people are often unaware of their actions...the good old fight or flight instinct.

Mark


User currently offlineScalebuilder From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1701 times:

Quoting Galleyhag (Reply 3):
Whilst taxiing however it is under the jurisdiction of the country it is in. Once full power has been applied on the take off roll it reverts to the country of reg.

That's pretty interesting. I could never have reasoned myself to that  Wink.

Quoting Galleyhag (Reply 3):
However, the ANO's allow us a huge amount of authority and the police and company back us 100%.

It seems to me that this kind of authority is what it will take for crew members to have to be effective. I once witnessed a business class passenger being moved and handcuffed in economy where I was seated with my family. I was really impressed by the crew that handled the situation with such professionalism.

I never hear much about air rage in the U.S. It could likely be due to the current day presence of air marshalls onboard flights. If an international flight is diverted, and someone is arrested, it typically involves someone from Europe.

Why is that? Am I just plain wrong here?


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