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Why Do All Canadian Airport Codes Start With "y"?  
User currently offlineNZ8800 From New Zealand, joined May 2006, 425 posts, RR: 2
Posted (8 years 5 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 29526 times:

Some are recognisable(ish) like YVR - Vancouver, and YWG - Winnipeg.

Then there's almost a code with the YY's... but what it means beats me.

YYC - Calgary
YYG - Charlottetown
YYJ - Victoria
YYT - St Johns
YYZ - Toronto


When airport codes in many other countries are recognisable, eg LHR, AKL, SYD, PPT, EZE, CPT, CDG, OSL, HEL... why are Canada's like they are?
Geekish question - but I've sometimes wondered!!!


MDZWTA ~ Mobile Disaster Zone When Travelling Abroad
23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRamprat From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 188 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (8 years 5 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 29492 times:

did you do a search, as this question comes up quite frequently.

User currently offlineUtapao From Thailand, joined Jul 2005, 645 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (8 years 5 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 29462 times:

Where Does The Canadian Y Come From? (by Airevents Apr 19 2006 in Civil Aviation)#ID2726954

Canadian Airports - Why The "Y" (by Flyhigh69 Feb 16 2004 in Civil Aviation)#ID1404354



Sawasdee khrab!
User currently offlineANother From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 5 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 28938 times:

Quoting NZ8800 (Thread starter):
Why Do All Canadian Airport Codes Start With "y"?

They don't.


User currently offlineNZ8800 From New Zealand, joined May 2006, 425 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (8 years 5 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 28887 times:

Thanks everyone - I guess I didn't get the search thing working properly - question answered.


MDZWTA ~ Mobile Disaster Zone When Travelling Abroad
User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 5 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 28874 times:

Because "eh" was taken ????  silly 

 duck 


User currently offlineLHR777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (8 years 5 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 28476 times:

Y-not? Big grin

...and now, a little filler text...!


User currently offlineSpacemanspiff From Maldives, joined Jun 2006, 79 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (8 years 5 months 4 weeks ago) and read 28081 times:

aint it cool and unique.


i am a weirdo from outer space
User currently offlineAviator27 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (8 years 5 months 4 weeks ago) and read 27869 times:

With the Chicago Convention in 1944, ICAO was formed. Different letters were assigned to different regions of the world for their 4 letter ICAO airport code, which is different from three letter IATA code. For example London Heathrow is EGLL/LHR. Palma de Mallorca is LEPA/PMI. Paris Charles De Gaul is LFPG/CDG. The USA is easy, you add K in front of the IATA code and you get the ICAO code. KMIA/MIA, KLAX/LAX, KORD/ORD, KMSP/MSP. Here is a list of ICAO airport prefixes.

K= USA
Y = CANADA
EG = ENGLAND
Z = CHINA
U = RUSSIA
LF = FRANCE
LE = SPAIN

There are tons more.

Also aircraft registrations were assigned.

N = USA
F = FRANCE
EC = SPAIN
I = ITALY
VT = INDIA
D = GERMANY
A6 = UAE
C = CANADA
G = UK

Along with many many more.


User currently offlineBA757 From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2832 posts, RR: 14
Reply 9, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 27776 times:

Quoting Aviator27 (Reply 8):
EG = ENGLAND

Wouldn't that be the UNITED KINGDOM, as Scotland, Wales & NI also have EG**  Smile

Adam


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 27483 times:

Quoting Aviator27 (Reply 8):
The USA is easy, you add K in front of the IATA code and you get the ICAO code.

Explain PANC - ANC? PJNU - JNU? PAFA - FAI? PHNL - HNL? PASC - SCC?

I don't think all of the US airport codes can simply have a K added in front of them to get the ICAO code . . . Fairbanks is an example above - PAFA(ICAO) = FAI (IATA) or Deadhorse above - PASC (ICAO) = SCC (IATA).


Far be it for me to sharp shoot an airline pilot, but there's obviously more to it than what is offered above . . .


User currently offlineSlawko From Canada, joined May 1999, 3799 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 27216 times:

Quoting Aviator27 (Reply 8):
With the Chicago Convention in 1944, ICAO was formed. Different letters were assigned to different regions of the world for their 4 letter ICAO airport code, which is different from three letter IATA code. For example London Heathrow is EGLL/LHR. Palma de Mallorca is LEPA/PMI. Paris Charles De Gaul is LFPG/CDG. The USA is easy, you add K in front of the IATA code and you get the ICAO code. KMIA/MIA, KLAX/LAX, KORD/ORD, KMSP/MSP. Here is a list of ICAO airport prefixes.

K= USA
Y = CANADA
EG = ENGLAND
Z = CHINA
U = RUSSIA
LF = FRANCE
LE = SPAIN

Canada's ICAO Code is C, not Y, as in CYYZ, CYVR, CYUL.



"Clive Beddoe says he favours competition, but his actions do not support that idea." Robert Milton - CEO Air Canada
User currently offlineBeechNut From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 731 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 27190 times:

Actually all Canadian airports start with a C. Internationally, YUL or YYZ for example are CYUL and CYYZ. The correct question is whether the second letter of all Canadian airports is a "Y". And the answer is no. For example my home field is CZBM (Bromont, Quebec).

Once upon a time "Y" designated airports with weather reporting facilities and other letters, aerodromes that did not (all airports are aerodromes, but not all aerodromes are airports!). The other two letters come from the railway station telegraph code for the city. As noted some are obvious, some less so.

Beech.


User currently offlineAviator27 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 27041 times:

Hawaii and Alaska become the 49th and 50th state after the Chicago Convention. Both became states in 1959. Hence they fell into the P = Pacific regional code. My mistake on the Canada code.

User currently offlineANother From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 27041 times:

Quoting BeechNut (Reply 12):
As noted some are obvious, some less so.

Some are more obvious if you know Morse code. (Y)TO would be - --- which could be misinterpeted easily.


User currently offlineAirMailer From United States of America, joined May 2006, 481 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 26632 times:

Quoting BA757 (Reply 9):
Wouldn't that be the UNITED KINGDOM, as Scotland, Wales & NI also have EG**

Speaking of...

This may be a stupid question, but what's the difference between the UK and Britain?


User currently offlineRikkus67 From Canada, joined Jun 2000, 1684 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 26357 times:

posted by TGUman, Thu Apr 20 2006:

Quote:
Okay, so the final answer, and specifically the answer to the question above is found here below. I am going to be quoting from my Canadian IFR ground school course text written by Micheal Culhane.

"Although the naming of Canadian airports and weather stations can seem confusing, here is a brief explanation. Originally, in the 1930's, Canada used two letters for identification of a weather reporting station. Additionally, preceding the 2-letter code, was placed a Y (meaning "yes") where the reporting station was co-located with an airport, a W (meaning "without") where the reporting station was not co-located with an airport, and a U where the reporting station was co-located with an NDB. An X was used if hte last two letters of the code had already been taken by another Canadian ident, and a Z was used if the locator could be confused with a U.S. three letter ident. ... The ICAO names are in a 4 letter format starting with a C for Canadian airports." (section 2.18 pg 64)

NZ8800...hope that helps.

Also for Airmailer: Great Britain / England is part of the UNITED KINGDOM, which also takes in Scotland and Wales.... IF I don't have that completely correct, would someone from the UK please correct me!



AC.WA.CP.DL.RW.CO.WG.WJ.WN.KI.FL.SK.ACL.UA.US.F9
User currently offlineRampart From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 3156 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 26357 times:

UK is the "united kingdoms" of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, the name of the country -- full name is "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland". Britain (or Great Britain) refers to the island (which includes England, Scotland, and Wales), named for an early tribe.

-Rampart

[Edited 2006-07-03 17:27:47]

User currently offlineRikkus67 From Canada, joined Jun 2000, 1684 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 26216 times:

Thanks for that Rampart! It's been a while since I have had to recall that. I think I need some more coffee to dust the cobwebs off this AM!


AC.WA.CP.DL.RW.CO.WG.WJ.WN.KI.FL.SK.ACL.UA.US.F9
User currently offlineANother From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 26128 times:

Quoting Rampart (Reply 17):
Britain (or Great Britain) refers to the island (which includes England, Scotland, and Wales), named for an early tribe.

I've always wondered ... What's (or Who is/was) an Eng?


User currently offlineVV701 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 7742 posts, RR: 17
Reply 20, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 26078 times:

I've always wondered ... What's (or Who is/was) an Eng?[/quote]
Actually it was Angles, a Germanic tribe originating in Schleswig-Holstein in northern Germany who, with the Saxons (from Saxony again in Germany) and the Jutes (from Jutland, Denmark) invaded what became Angleland that transmuted into England between 1,500 and 1,600 years ago. The local population of Picts were pushed into Wales, Ireland and Scotland. The north (Highlands) and west (Islands of Scotland were subsequently invaded by the Vikings (from Scandinavia) leaving two distinct Scottish races that are still distinguishable today, namely the tall sometimes red headed Highlander and Islander and the shorter more swarthy darker Lowlander/

Quoting AirMailer (Reply 15):
This may be a stupid question, but what's the difference between the UK and Britain?



Quoting Rampart (Reply 17):
"United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".

But here things get a lot more complicated when you look at Jersey, Guernsey and Sark (the Channel Islands) and the Isle of Man. Are they part of the UK? Well, not really. Are they separate countries? Well they have their own Parliaments and do not send representatives to the Westminster parliament but, still, not really (even though they have their own stamps and coins) as they are illegible to joinn the UN. What is more they are not part of the EU!

So what are they? Well Jersey is governed by their parliament and a Governor General who is Queen Elizabeth's representative on the island. They are a British dependency.

Why bother with all this detail? Well what is most relevant to us is that BA Connect is registered in the Isle of Man as are most of its aircraft - i,e outside the EU - while BA itself is registered like its aircraft in the UK! Now please do not ask me why, but tax could be one reason.


User currently offlineRampart From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 3156 posts, RR: 6
Reply 21, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 26067 times:

Quoting ANother (Reply 19):
I've always wondered ... What's (or Who is/was) an Eng?

"England" is a derivation of the "land of the Angles", again named for one of the early tribes (and for which Anglia is also named, I think a Roman province name now attributed to a region of England).

Sorry, geography is my profession, aviation is just a hobby.

-Rampart


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 25751 times:

Quoting Aviator27 (Reply 13):
Hawaii and Alaska become the 49th and 50th state after the Chicago Convention. Both became states in 1959. Hence they fell into the P = Pacific regional code

Excellent, thanks for that . . .


User currently offlineBA747YYZ From Canada, joined Mar 2006, 377 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 25673 times:

Because we got screwed by that and then we decided to keep it to confuse as many foreigners as possible, I guess it worked  Smile

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