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Dispatching Jobs?  
User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5049 posts, RR: 15
Posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1969 times:

What other types of aviation careers are there besides inflight (crew, F/A), ticketing/ramp, andd mechanics?

How about the dispatchers? What kind of experience or degree do they need? I looked up on a few airlines' websites and the job postings are either real low paying (i.e. ramp/ticketing) or high level (i.e. Management).

What about the airlines' "communications" (or whatever they call it) dept - like the ones who handle press, p.r., and interface between the compnay and the media? Do they contract out for that work becausee I have never seen an opening?


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCody From United States of America, joined May 1999, 1932 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1890 times:

Dispatcher's must have a dispatcher's license. They take all the written tests that a pilot does. Thye pretty much are pilots that sit on the ground. From what I have seen, turnover is very high due to low pay. If you are interested in working for an airline behind the scenes, you can get a degree in airline management or you can get a business degree or something like that. With this you could get a job in the marketing dept, crew scheduling, aircraft scheduling, route planning, etc. Just appy to any airline by sending them a resume.

User currently offlineExusair From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 684 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1887 times:

I have a couple of friends who are/were dispatchers. They take the basically the same test as the Flight Engineer Written exam. You can buy the book at any major F.B.O. with ground school. You must attend a course at a school, you can find those in the back of Flying magazine. I have a friend who dispatches for one of USAir's wholly owned commuter subsidiaries. He basically runs a particular sector of the operation for his shift. Cancellations and diversions are handled by him. The pay is somewhere in the mid 30's range. It is very difficult walk right in to a major carrier and get a dispatch job. They prefer people with a few years in Customer Service, then in Operations. Then of course you have to have the right connections.

User currently offlineWoxof From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1892 times:

The written test is the same written as the ATP. In fact, it is the same Gleim/ASA book to "study" for the test. The oral is probably very similar to an ATP oral, but you obviously don't transition to the sim ride! Lots, and LOTS of weather related situations/scenarios.
I disagree on the pay. So long as you are with a major, the pay and schedule can be rather appealing. Of course, you are likely going to need to start at a commuter and...we all know how they pay for all jobs.

I suggest you go to the web site of the Airline Dispatchers Federation of which I am a member to get more information. The site is LOADED with information to answer any and all questions you might have.

www.dispatcher.org


User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1882 times:

As others have mentioned, you'll have to attend an approved school to prepare for the license exam. Some schools do the bare minimum (200 hrs, usually aboy 6 weeks) but some others do more. The ADF website has some good links.

On the hiring front, major airlines rarely hire front outside their own company (off the street), and whenever they do (rare) it's to meet a need rapidly. Accordingly, *experienced* off the street folks will get the nod over someone fresh out of school. At some airlines, usually the smaller ones, they will hire folks straight from school, but the pay isn't usually all that great compared to the majors, where pay can exceed $80K depending upon the labor contract in force.

Best advice I can offer is this:

*1 Figure out which airline you want to ultimately dispatch for, and where you'd like to live. Balance the answers to those two questions carefully. You may love the airline, but hate the city, or vice versa. Here's a list of most US airlines and the city where there dispatch office is located:

Airborne Express, Wilmington, OH
Alaska Airlines- Seattle, WA
America West- Phoenix, AZ
American Eagle- Fort Worth, Texas
American- Ft. Worth, TX
Atlantic Coast- Herndon, VA
Comair- Cincinnati, OH
Continental Express- Houston, TX
Continental- Houston, TX
Delta- Atlanta, GA
DHL, Dayton, OH
Federal Express, Memphis TN
Frontier- Denver, CO
Horizon- Portland, OR
Jet Blue, New York, NY
Legend- Dallas, TX
Mesa, Phoenix, AZ
Midway, Raleigh, NC
Midwest Express, Milwaukee, WI
National, Las Vegas, NV
Northwest- Minneapolis, MN
Piedmont- Salsbury, MD
Pro Air- Seattle, WA
Sky West- St. George, UT
Southwest- Dallas TX
Spirit, Fort Lauderdale, FL
TWA Express, St. Louis, MO
TWA- St. Louis, MO
United- Chicago, IL
UPS- Louisville, KY
USAirways- Pittsburgh, PA

*2 After deciding the above, get yourself hired on where ever you can, even part-time, even pushing a broom or working the ramp (the latter being a common entry level position). No, it won't be great pay, but whenever a dispatch opening does come up, you'll be an internal applicant trying to transfer versus Joe Blow off the street. In your case, another approach would be the PR/marketing/CSA areas.

3. Don't give up...!

Give me an email at my profile address for more info..

Hope this helps...


User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29792 posts, RR: 58
Reply 5, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1871 times:

In order to work as a dispatcher for a part 121 airline you have to have have a dispatcher license. As was mentioned before the test is very simular to the ATP. I used to give both tests as a FAA Test Administrator. Not only does ASA and Gleim use the same test prep book for the test but the FAA exihibits for the test are the same. So that tells you how simular they are.

In order to hold a dispatch license you have to be at least 23 years old, And can get your license either by attending one of the dispatch schools or by working as an apprentice under a licensed dispatcher for....If I remember correctly 2 years(Correct me if I am wrong) He would then sign you off for taking the dispatch test. Usually you would be called a dispatchers assistant or a flight coordinator at a company when you are doing that. I should mention I think I have seen maybe two adds for those two jobs in the time that I have payed attention to what airlines where hiring up here in Anchorage.

Most of the other jobs that where mentioned such as crew/aircraft scheduler, Office Coordinator, Weight and Balance tech, Fuel Purchasers, Freight coordinators. are similar. A lot of them are revamed so they do not require licenses but are pretty comparmentalized. A lot of these jobs are created so fewer dispatchers are needed or to define who has a license and who doesn't Still they can lead to getting a dispatch license.

Now Part 135 carriers do not to have licensed dispatchers. Because the dispatcher isn't licensed they can not take resposiblity for the flight. A lot of times you will see these jobs listed at flight coordinators or office managers also. So a lot of the paperwork falls back onto the flight crew. I currently do this for a Part 135 carrier in ANC. It is interesting and I wouldn't mind picking up my license eventually. You have a lot more options with the license then you do without.

The dispatch.org site is pretty good. I would also suggest that you puruse the various airlines websites and see what jobs they have open. Southwest Airlines site is great for that.

Also I want to add that most major airlines have more then one dispatch office, They will keep smaller offices at smaller hubs. Alaska Airlines has one of these at their Anchorage base.




OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 1865 times:

>>>Also I want to add that most major airlines have more then one dispatch office, They will keep smaller offices at smaller hubs. Alaska Airlines has one of these at their Anchorage base.


I don't know that I'd say most... United used to have one at Washington Dulles (and another on the west coast, I think) before they were merged into ORD, and that was 25-30 years ago. NW has a small satellite office in Tokyo; ditto for Delta in Frankurt. Other than than, I can't think of anyone else with more than one dispatch office. Was Alaska's ANC facility an actual dispatch office, or just a big local ops office, perhaps with a crew base..?

Cheers...


User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29792 posts, RR: 58
Reply 7, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 1866 times:

Ops office might be the better word for it, but it is staffed with licensed dispatchers.


OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5049 posts, RR: 15
Reply 8, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1855 times:

Very interesting info. I'll check out the website first


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1847 times:

>>>Ops office might be the better word for it, but it is staffed with licensed dispatchers.

Unless there is some internal requirement at Alaska for their ops (or load planning) folks to have dispatcher licenses, it sounds as if the folks have gotten them in anticipation of there being an eventual opening at the Seattle SOCC office, and being eligible for internal transfer.

I have no doubt that the knowledge these ANC folks have acquired in the pursuit of their ADX tickets helps them in their local ops duties, but they're not responsible for the operationAL control of the flights. That would be the folks in SEA...

Give me a holler via email sometime...



User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29792 posts, RR: 58
Reply 10, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1846 times:

Actually I am going to disagree with you, based on what I remember about them. Keeping in mind that both their operation and my memory from five years ago probably isn't what it used to be.

Alaska Airlines is a little different in some respects. It is almost better to think of them as two airlines. There is the Lower 48 operations and their Alaskan-operations. I knew a mechanic who was totally lost on the 737-200QC. This is because he transfered from their LAX aircraft base after working there for a couple of years and had never seen one the whole time that he was there. That is just an example but it kinda indicates how seperate their Alaska ops. I should also state a lot of this probably also has to do with the types of operations that Alaska does. They basicly don't have any straight freighter or combi flights in the lower 48. It is probably better for them to have people familiar with those operations close to the flights rather then a minimum of 1300 miles away.

When I was working for Reeve anytime we had to service an Alaska flight we had to go through the dispatchers at Anchorage, not the ones in Seattle. They where the ones with operational control for the flight. When I was ramping for Alaska all load/fuel changes where done locally and signed off locally.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29792 posts, RR: 58
Reply 11, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1842 times:

I forgot to add but if anybody has a clearer picture then my 5 year old memory give plz chime in. But I do remember clearly the office that all the stuff I talked about was done in was called the dispatch office

OPNLguy you are probably right, It is an internal decision to staff that office with dispatchers but it is a really good decision to have up here.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
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