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Enders: Airbus Will Continue To Be Succesfull  
User currently offlineManni From South Korea, joined Nov 2001, 4221 posts, RR: 22
Posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4347 times:

Looks like Airbus is in full speed teasing the media at the advent of Farnborough.

http://www.todayonline.com/articles/130129.asp

A bit of the article,

Boeing's rival 787 Dreamliner appeared to be more popular with clients. But Enders insisted the A350 would be the superior aircraft.


Boeing was currently in the lead.
"But the picture is going to change," Enders vowed.


"We're working full steam on that," he said. What was important was not the delivery date, but the product, Enders said. � AFP


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21 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRuscoe From Australia, joined Aug 1999, 1567 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4301 times:

Quoting Manni (Thread starter):
What was important was not the delivery date, but the product, Enders said. � AFP

Oh dear! I bet he already regrets saying that. He would know better than most that timing is very important in aircraft development.

Ruscoe


User currently offlineBeaucaire From Syria, joined Sep 2003, 5252 posts, RR: 24
Reply 2, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4242 times:

Some other interesting remarks-
-he claims a great relation with Louis Gallois,who has " prusssian style work-ethic "
-Christian Streiff does not have a 100 day job intruduction -delay excuse
-China,India,Russia and Brazil are potential suppliers of competetive aircaft in due time...
-Airbus has underestimated the 787 but this will never happen again
-no rush to present new models in Farnborough just to please media...
-Airbus sales have to work closer with engineering !
-Airbus will deliver this year more than 400 aircraft ( 2000 are on order..)

http://www.faz.net/d/invest/meldung.aspx?id=29215943
http://www.ftd.de/unternehmen/industrie/95617.html



Please respect animals - don't eat them...
User currently offlineBoomBoom From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4148 times:

A wide ranging article in the WSJ with a few tidbits of news:

Quote:
EADS believes the company isn't in need of restructuring despite recent problems in its aircraft unit Airbus, Co-Chief Executive Tom Enders told the Business Press Club in Stuttgart Tuesday evening.

He also reiterated the delivery targets for 2006.

Production capacity at Airbus will be fully utilized over the next four to five years, the CEO said.

"But we aren't eager to take on contracts that aren't profitable,"

"To date there have been no cancellations of the A380," said Enders, adding that this is proof that the superjumbo is a superior product.

Neither does Enders see any risk of losing customers for the long-haul aircraft A350, even though deliveries of the aircraft have already been delayed, because the revised version will be an improvement on the original version. However, he declined to comment on the nature of the adjustments or to give a delivery date.

"We are working on it very intensively but we don't feel that we are tied-down to any particular date," said Enders ahead of the forthcoming air show in Farnborough.

The Airbus strategy isn't for an early-as-possible delivery of the aircraft but rather to offer a superior product, Enders said.

Therefore he doesn't see the A350 delivery delay as a step backwards.

"This is better than offering a "me-too" plane," he said.

"We will try to shorten the aircraft development time and speed up the time it takes to ramp up production," he said.

Enders said he had commissioned an audit to find out the causes for the technical problems that led to the delivery delays of the superjumbo A380. But he declined to answer questions on whether there would be any further delays or if further consequences for personnel could be ruled out.

At the same time, he said that the co-CEO arrangement isn't the ideal solution for the company.

"I would have preferred to have one CEO and one chairman," Enders said, adding that the double-CEO leadership structure is difficult because the personal relationship must fit.

Enders said he expects more demand from China in the next 10-15 years. For this reason, Airbus is considering building an assembly facility in Tianjin.

"But we haven't yet reached a decision on this," said Enders.

BAE Systems is seeking more than the EUR2.75 billion for the stake, as valued by the investment bank NM Rothschild & Sons.

Enders however sees no reason to pay a higher price.

http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-...0712-702089.html?mod=moj_companies


User currently offlineAirFrnt From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 2826 posts, RR: 42
Reply 4, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4121 times:

Quoting Manni (Thread starter):

Boeing's rival 787 Dreamliner appeared to be more popular with clients. But Enders insisted the A350 would be the superior aircraft.


Boeing was currently in the lead.
"But the picture is going to change," Enders vowed.

This is exactly the kind of arrogance that got them in trouble in the first place. Great rhetorical statements backed up by planes that were not what the market was looking for.


User currently offlineAirFrnt From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 2826 posts, RR: 42
Reply 5, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4117 times:

Quoting BoomBoom (Reply 3):
"We are working on it very intensively but we don't feel that we are tied-down to any particular date," said Enders ahead of the forthcoming air show in Farnborough.

The Airbus strategy isn't for an early-as-possible delivery of the aircraft but rather to offer a superior product, Enders said.

Therefore he doesn't see the A350 delivery delay as a step backwards.

Wasn't it actually a German who wrote that the Battle is won by the person who gets to the battle field first with the most?


User currently offlineBeaucaire From Syria, joined Sep 2003, 5252 posts, RR: 24
Reply 6, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4080 times:

Quoting AirFrnt (Reply 4):
This is exactly the kind of arrogance that got them in trouble in the first place. Great rhetorical statements backed up by planes that were not what the market was looking for.

Enders is everything you want but not arrogant....
He admits mistakes in strategy but simply is defending his technology,knowing more about the future performances of the A350 than all a.net members combined...
There is a difference between arrogance and knowledge capability!
He would be a lousy CEO of EADS if he would admit that Airbus can't fight the 787 .



Please respect animals - don't eat them...
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 35
Reply 7, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4054 times:

Quoting BoomBoom (Reply 3):
(quoting Enders)Enders said he expects more demand from China in the next 10-15 years. For this reason, Airbus is considering building an assembly facility in Tianjin.

"But we haven't yet reached a decision on this," said Enders.

Oh dear........

I've been wondering how Airbus was going to finance the Chinese factory, and also pacify their unions about 'exporting jobs' to China when the guys in the European plants are worried about their own jobs.

But if Enders has it in mind to break a promise to the mainland Chinese Government, I can offer him some advice. First, it's best not to make ANY promises to them. But if you DO make any, don't break them. The loss of 150 X A320 orders will only be the first volley in a long programme of reprisals.



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineBoomBoom From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3958 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 7):
Oh dear........

Well it's not surprising. If the new management team needs time to re-evaluate the A370, they should also take a look at this venture.

On the subject of the dual management structure he says at one point

Quote:
...the company isn't in need of restructuring despite recent problems in its aircraft unit Airbus..."The problems at Airbus don't mean that we are a case for restructuring," Enders said.

Then he goes on to say

Quote:
...that the co-CEO arrangement isn't the ideal solution for the company.

"I would have preferred to have one CEO and one chairman," Enders said, adding that the double-CEO leadership structure is difficult because the personal relationship must fit.

He seems to be contradicting himself here.


User currently offlineRuscoe From Australia, joined Aug 1999, 1567 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 3851 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 7):
I've been wondering how Airbus was going to finance the Chinese factory, and also pacify their unions about 'exporting jobs' to China when the guys in the European plants are worried about their own jobs.

I have always wondered what was in this for Airbus or even the Chinese.
You outlined the problem for Airbus, and for the Chinese, they get to assemble an aircraft which is at the end of its life. It seems Airbus can easily get their 50% of the market without the production line. The Chinese economy certainly does not need the work.

The only rational argument I can think of is that they want the Chinese to be risk sharing partners in a future development, and this could be quite advantageous.

Ruscoe


User currently offlineKatekebo From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 704 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 3829 times:

Quoting Ruscoe (Reply 9):
I have always wondered what was in this for Airbus or even the Chinese.

Well, there are still some clear advantages for both sides.

For Airbus it is cheap labor. Airplane assembly is a labor-intesive work and China can provide cheap, yet highly qualified labor.

For China there is the advantage of technology transfer that can speed up their learning curve in commercial aviation.


User currently onlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31003 posts, RR: 86
Reply 11, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 3771 times:
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Of course Airbus will continue to be succesful.  Smile

As to selling the A320 to the internal Chinese market, it will give Airbus a good boost on selling into the domestic narrowbody market and should be some "cheap profits" since the production cost will be low, resulting in a low sales price.

However, if Airbus does indeed "lock up" the narrowbody market, in order to keep "order parity" will require China to buy Boeing widebodies. And Boeing will not need to discount those widebodies as deeply since China won't be looking at the Airbus product. So Boeing should make more margin out of the deal, even with higher production prices and lower volumes, then Airbus does.

[Edited 2006-07-13 00:20:23]

User currently offlineRIXrat From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 789 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3746 times:

What did you all expect Enders to say? "Yeah, the company is collapsing all around me." He's trying to put the best spin possible on Airbus and its products after much coaching from the spinsters and probably several in-house fake TV news conferences on hard questions. Interesting to note that he still refers to the A350 and not the A370.

User currently offlineAeroplan73 From Canada, joined May 2006, 165 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3678 times:

Quoting Katekebo (Reply 10):
For Airbus it is cheap labor. Airplane assembly is a labor-intesive work and China can provide cheap, yet highly qualified labor.

The words 'cheap' and 'Boeing', or 'cheap', and 'Airbus', should never be in the same sentence. Not to knock the Chinese, but when I'm at 35000ft, it's comforting to know Europe or the US has built the plane.



I remember, the choices were chicken or fish. I had the lasagna.
User currently offlineScbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12567 posts, RR: 46
Reply 14, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3576 times:
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Quoting NAV20 (Reply 7):
I've been wondering how Airbus was going to finance the Chinese factory, and also pacify their unions about 'exporting jobs' to China when the guys in the European plants are worried about their own jobs.

The Chinese FAL for the A320 is to produce just 4 planes per month. These will be in addition to the increasing production rate for the A320 family in Europe. Which jobs will be in danger of being lost exactly?



Time flies like an arrow, but fruit flies like a banana!
User currently offlineJoni From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3562 times:

Quoting Katekebo (Reply 10):


For Airbus it is cheap labor. Airplane assembly is a labor-intesive work and China can provide cheap, yet highly qualified labor.

For China there is the advantage of technology transfer that can speed up their learning curve in commercial aviation.

A320E, built in China with low labour and other costs, could be a nightmare for Boeing. Of course there are other benefits, the Chinese get experience of large a/c assembly and Airbus improves its relationship to the Chinese government as a consequence. They may buy 100+ A380s over the years.


User currently offlineHalibut From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3507 times:

Quoting Joni (Reply 15):
A320E, built in China with low labour and other costs, could be a nightmare for Boeing. Of course there are other benefits, the Chinese get experience of large a/c assembly and Airbus improves its relationship to the Chinese government as a consequence. They may buy 100+ A380s over the years.

Perhaps ,
However, Western aviation companies in China have not turned out so well in the past . We'll see if Airbus can pull it off .

Halibut


http://www.businessweek.com/globalbi...tent/apr2006/gb20060413_842097.htm

APRIL 13, 2006

Aerospace
By Carol Matlack, Stanley Holmes and Frederik Balfour


Airbus May Hit An Air Pocket Over China
Why its plan to build narrowbody planes there could come up short
Carol Matlack, Stanley Holmes and Frederik Balfour



Well, maybe not. Airbus isn't likely to save money building planes in China. Wings, fuselages, and other components would still be made at Airbus' European factories and shipped to China for assembly. The expense of transporting them and setting up a complex supply chain, along with recruiting and training Chinese workers, would wipe out labor cost savings, analysts say. Airbus executives, citing the sensitivity of ongoing negotiations, declined comment. But a spokesman acknowledges that Airbus' main reason for the plant is to gain greater access to the Chinese market.

Even basic assembly in China has not panned out for some Western aircraft makers. Brazil's Embraer (ERJ), which opened a factory in Harbin in 2002 to make regional jets, has so far delivered only nine planes. McDonnell Douglas, the U.S. aerospace company later acquired by Boeing, set up a factory in Shanghai in the 1990s to build MD-80 and MD-90 jets. Plagued with quality problems and logistical snafus, it produced 55 planes before being shut down in 2000[/i]

[Edited 2006-07-13 13:03:37]

User currently offlineParabolica From Spain, joined Mar 2006, 85 posts, RR: 14
Reply 17, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 3465 times:

Oh Dear

Setting up full scale aircraft assembly in China is short term financial advantage in return for a full time competitor in the future. Industrial offset of high technology is always a risky business, and one I think will bring Airbus regrets later on.

P-



oh please let there never be cell phones in airliners...
User currently offlineJoni From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 3448 times:

Quoting Parabolica (Reply 17):

Setting up full scale aircraft assembly in China is short term financial advantage in return for a full time competitor in the future. Industrial offset of high technology is always a risky business, and one I think will bring Airbus regrets later on.

A Chinese competitor to A&B will arise in the future in any case. Expect an influx of "C" fans to this board by then...


User currently offlineParabolica From Spain, joined Mar 2006, 85 posts, RR: 14
Reply 19, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 3441 times:

Terve Joni

Quoting Joni (Reply 18):
A Chinese competitor to A&B will arise in the future in any case. Expect an influx of "C" fans to this board by then...

...and E (Embraer). Personally, I can't wait to see widebody competitors from Asia. My pet dream would be to see something meaningful from Bombardier, seeing as Canada has an illustrious aviation history and certainly has the finance and technical knowledge to do it.

Sigh... never happen....

P-



oh please let there never be cell phones in airliners...
User currently offlineBoomBoom From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 3359 times:

Quoting Joni (Reply 15):
A320E, built in China with low labour and other costs, could be a nightmare for Boeing.

Could be a nightmare for Airbus:

Quote:
The history of jetliner production in China is grim. Disregarding the awful indigenous stuff, the biggest disaster was McDonnell Douglas’s Shanghai plant. After a huge investment, the plant built 35 MD-80s and two MD-90s. Five of the 80s had to be re-exported, to TWA.

Despite MD’s China fiasco, jet manufacturers haven’t all gotten the message. More recently, in 2002 Embraer built an ERJ facility in Harbin After investing $40 million, Embraer sold six planes. Three years later after a sales campaign resembling tooth extraction, they sold six more.

http://www.richardaboulafia.com/shownote.asp?id=207

[Edited 2006-07-13 19:31:38]

User currently onlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31003 posts, RR: 86
Reply 21, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3275 times:
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Quoting Joni (Reply 15):
A320E, built in China with low labour and other costs, could be a nightmare for Boeing.

Not if they're only building 48 a year as Scbriml states immediately before you.  Smile

Quote:
Of course there are other benefits, the Chinese get experience of large a/c assembly and Airbus improves its relationship to the Chinese government as a consequence. They may buy 100+ A380s over the years.

I still believe China's domestuc aviation future is the 787-3. The infrastructure investment to airports to support A380s would be truly astounding - many orders of magnitude beyond the cost of the planes themselves. 787-3s could be used at many, if not most, existing domestic Chinese airports.

Now, when it comes to flying Chinese citizens to other cities around the world, then yes, the A380 may very well play an important role for the state airlines.


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