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Flight Deck Crews Certified For Multiple Types  
User currently offlineWarreng24 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 707 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 2870 times:

How often does this happen, if at all...

Assuming that a crew is certified/trained to operate both types, how often would a flight crew operate an A320 and then a 737?

For example, United operates both the A320 and 737. Does it ever occur that a Captain and First Officer will an A320 in, and then fly a 737 out on their next leg?

17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBucky707 From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 1028 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 2868 times:

I don't know of any airlines in the US that have dual quals anymore. Can't say about the rest of the world.

I know Delta for a while had what they called "dual pool" First officers. These were usually guys who were an engineer on say the 727 while also being qualified and flying as an FO on the DC-9. But that program went away years ago.

The only thing other than standard ops that I know of is Southwest which has some FOs qualified to fly as Captain. So they may fly a trip as an FO this week and as Captain next week.


User currently offlineCkfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5179 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (8 years 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 2754 times:

The FAA does allow pilots to be qualified on both the 757 and 767, since their cockpits are virtually identical, even though they are very different in terms of performance and procedures.

User currently offlineCALPilot From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 998 posts, RR: 14
Reply 3, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2713 times:

Do crews fly other types of aircraft?

No not at any US carrier that I know of; maybe some Check Airman in the training departments, but not line pilots. A line pilot will normally fly his/her bid aircraft for the period of time that they can, or choose to hold that aircraft.

Quoting Ckfred (Reply 2):
The FAA does allow pilots to be qualified on both the 757 and 767, since their cockpits are virtually identical, even though they are very different in terms of performance and procedures

Performance is not a big deal; procedures in both airplanes (B757/767) at my airline are excatly the same in most situations, normals, abnormals, and emergencies.


User currently offlineFlyinTLow From Germany, joined Oct 2004, 520 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2707 times:

the thing which probably keeps airlines from doing this is the costs for training and simulator hours. Flying two cockpit types (757/767 or 320/330/340 don't count there) means having to have twice the amount of simulator hours and simulator checks to show your profeciency on both types. Wouldn't make sense for an airline.

Cheers,

Thilo



- When dreams take flight, follow them -
User currently offlineNwafflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 1050 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2694 times:

so, take Northwest -- dc-9's are going away -- replaced by ERJ's (at least I hope so)/ The NWA dc-9 pilots/first officers can't fly the airbus, are they being re-trained on the ERJ?

User currently offlineMCOflyer From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 8664 posts, RR: 15
Reply 6, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2688 times:

A friend of mine who I bump into now and then at US is qualified on the A330/320 series and the 767/757. He told me he got bumped but is still qualified to fly both types.

So, its not that uncommon to see a guy fly a 757, then go to a 737 flt.

MCOflyer



Never be afraid to stand up for who you are.
User currently offlineLGAtoIND From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 490 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2665 times:

I read a couple of years ago that Austrian Airlines was one of the few airlines in the world that has certified its pilots to fly both the 320 and 330/340 series of aircraft. Are these 2 aircraft really that much different to fly?

User currently offlineBucky707 From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 1028 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2647 times:

Quoting MCOflyer (Reply 6):
A friend of mine who I bump into now and then at US is qualified on the A330/320 series and the 767/757. He told me he got bumped but is still qualified to fly both types.

So, its not that uncommon to see a guy fly a 757, then go to a 737 flt.

I used to fly the 767/757, but I'm now on the 88. I still have my 767/757 ratings, but I don't fly them anymore. I bet your friend, while still technically qualified to fly all those planes, does not in fact still do it.


User currently offlineMCOflyer From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 8664 posts, RR: 15
Reply 9, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2643 times:

I agree. I think he'll do an A320 series flt now and then. Bucky707 R U operating the DL flt out of MLB tomorrow?

MCOflyer



Never be afraid to stand up for who you are.
User currently offlineFlyinTLow From Germany, joined Oct 2004, 520 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 2617 times:

Quoting Nwafflyer (Reply 5):
so, take Northwest -- dc-9's are going away -- replaced by ERJ's (at least I hope so)/ The NWA dc-9 pilots/first officers can't fly the airbus, are they being re-trained on the ERJ?

quick question: why can't they fly the Airbus?



- When dreams take flight, follow them -
User currently offlineBucky707 From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 1028 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2575 times:

Quoting MCOflyer (Reply 9):
R U operating the DL flt out of MLB tomorrow?

nope. Home with the kids tomorrow.


User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6301 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2572 times:

A few years back I flew ORD-LHR and LHR-ORD on BA...a 744 on the way out, and a 772 on the way back, both with the same captain, Captain Geller. I thought it was somewhat odd, but neat.

[Edited 2006-07-17 05:13:31]

User currently offlineLPLAspotter From Portugal, joined Jan 2005, 682 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2559 times:

I did meet a United Senior Captain who stated that he flew 737s and 757/767s during the same month. Found it strange but he seemed sencere.

LPLAspotter



Nuke the Gay Wales for Christ
User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 14, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 2543 times:

Trans World Airlines for awhile allowed a few Captains to be qualified on THREE types at one time.
Specifically, the L1011, B747 and B767.

I personally know one of these guys, and he mentioned a LOT of simulator time was required to maintain qualification.

Reason enough to stick to one type, I would think.


User currently offlineAntiuser From Italy, joined May 2004, 657 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 2490 times:

Quoting LGAtoIND (Reply 7):
Are these 2 aircraft really that much different to fly?

I would think not - that's one of the things Airbus is most proud about in their line of products. Save for the A300 and A310 which are equipped with yokes instead of side sticks, pilots rated on the A320 can transition to the A330 or A340 in a little over a week. The A380 cockpit was designed with commonality in mind as well, so A330/340 pilots can quickly transition to the big bird, although I don't know how long the transition training would take.



Azzurri Campioni del Mondo!
User currently offlineAutoThrust From Switzerland, joined Jun 2006, 1591 posts, RR: 9
Reply 16, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 2460 times:

Quoting Antiuser (Reply 15):
pilots rated on the A320 can transition to the A330 or A340 in a little over a week. The A380 cockpit was designed with commonality in mind as well, so A330/340 pilots can quickly transition to the big bird, although I don't know how long the transition training would take.

Exactly, that's because fly bi wire and cockpit commonality. About CCQ time:

(whole family)
A320 to A380 15 days
A320 to A330/340 8 days
A340 to A380 13 days
A380 to A320 13 days
A330 to A340 3 days
A343 to A345/6 4 days

Airbus Cross Crew Qualification Brochure



“Faliure is not an option.”
User currently offlineLevent From France, joined Sep 2004, 1718 posts, RR: 5
Reply 17, posted (8 years 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 2405 times:

At Air Exel a few pilots had active double type ratings, e.g. EMB120 and ERJ145. At Denim Air, pilots only flew one type (Fokker 50 or Dash 8) but at a certain point Denim started to get DH3 crews current on the F50 again before their ratings expired.

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