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What Do Airlines Look For In New Pilots?  
User currently offlineBowflexBrennan From Australia, joined Jul 2006, 124 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 9148 times:

I know that the airlines have a point system they use when hiring new pilots, but what are all the things that can get you points. I know you need to have post secondary education, but does it look better if you went to college, or university. I am looking into a four year degree program at Seneca College, its a Bachelor of Applied Technology. You get your private and commercial licences, and your instrument rating, as well as the degree. Would this be a good program to take if I hope to fly for an airline when I am older, or is it better to take something non aviation related. The program I'm looking into has a couple of websites;

http://aviation.senecac.on.ca/

http://www.senecac.on.ca/fulltime/FPR.html

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSaab2000 From Switzerland, joined Jun 2001, 1618 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 9138 times:

Depends on where you are located. In Switzerland pilots were subjected to a fairly intense 'selection' process which involved a simulator check with some ridiculous navigational exercises (and some not so ridiculous), a lengthy personality profiling, aptitude and intellegence tests and meeting with a couple of people along the way, as well as a group exercise.

In the end it is the composite picture, but I think the most important thing is the personal 1 on 1 interview where the person is deciding if you are someone they can work with and whether or not you will have the right attitude for learning their way of doing things and can and will do things properly.

In the US, where I now work, the process was actually much simpler, but probably in the end no less selective.

Getting the interview can be the hard part. Getting the job is also tough because you don't always know what they are looking for, but in the interview it is usually personality and the rest of the numbers and other crap is not really important. Making a positive impression on the interviewer or interview board is a very important part of getting a flying job.



smrtrthnu
User currently offlineCalpilot From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 999 posts, RR: 13
Reply 2, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 9131 times:

Bow,

I have always belived that a Degree of any type is fine, equal in weight.

I can say that at my airline we apply a lot of consideration to current crewmembers recommendations.

As for flight time, at our airline we want to see a lot of quality PIC time.


User currently offlineFly727 From Mexico, joined Jul 2003, 1789 posts, RR: 19
Reply 3, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 9065 times:

Quoting Calpilot (Reply 2):
I have always belived that a Degree of any type is fine, equal in weight.

 checkmark 

No matter what kind of degree you get, just don't fail getting one. I would suggest going for something NOT aviation-related, this way, you'll have something to fall on if something with your aviation career goes wrong (furloughs, major downsizing, medical reasons, family issues...). Knock on wood, of course  Wink

Besides, being able to talk about something else but planes in those long flights is greatly appreciated by the other pilot...

Good luck with your training!

RM  Smile



There are no stupid questions... just stupid people!
User currently offlineComet4b From Canada, joined Jun 2006, 61 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 9016 times:

This is totally off topic but I have a question for CalpIlot which I hope he /she will answer for me.Recently on a flight from MEX to YYZ on a Mexicana 319 I was looking out the window at the horizon and became aware that there was a very gentle oscillation of the plane along the longitudinal axis.I have flown a fair amount and can honestly say I have never seen this before.Do all commercilas do this or is it type specific.This is not meant to be A bashing but a question from a retired Mechanical Engineer.
Thank you


User currently offlineFrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3814 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 8999 times:

I would say that during an airline selection process, the sim check and the interview with HR and technical staff probably accounts for something like 70 to 80% of the selection criteria.

The rest of the exams (math, aptitude, psych, etc..) are more to make sure you are not a complete moron/retard/serial killer.... Which doesn't mean that they should be taken lightly either, as they also test your capacity to focus on a given task.



Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
User currently offlineBowflexBrennan From Australia, joined Jul 2006, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 8875 times:

Quoting Fly727 (Reply 3):
I would suggest going for something NOT aviation-related, this way, you'll have something to fall on if something with your aviation career goes wrong

I see what you mean. I never really thought of that aspect, because if for some reason I can't get my medical, then I'm screwed and I'll have wasted all that money.


User currently offlineFly727 From Mexico, joined Jul 2003, 1789 posts, RR: 19
Reply 7, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 8839 times:

Quoting BowflexBrennan (Reply 6):
I see what you mean. I never really thought of that aspect, because if for some reason I can't get my medical, then I'm screwed and I'll have wasted all that money.

Great you mention this. Get your full medical up to the check standards for ATP (if so applies in Canada, I'm not sure how it works there) before you start training. This way you know for sure before spending a cent.

RM  Smile



There are no stupid questions... just stupid people!
User currently offlineLongHauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 5132 posts, RR: 43
Reply 8, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 8820 times:

Quoting Fly727 (Reply 7):
Great you mention this. Get your full medical up to the check standards for ATP (if so applies in Canada, I'm not sure how it works there) before you start training. This way you know for sure before spending a cent.

One of the requirements before receiving an entrance into an Aviation College or University in Canada, is passing a medical to ATPL standards. This would make sense, as they too do not wish to waste resources on a candidate that will not eventually make it into an airline.

These are Air Canada's hiring standards, and yes, there are A LOT of Seneca College grads in Air Canada.

http://www.aircanada.com/en/about/career/pilots.html



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineBowflexBrennan From Australia, joined Jul 2006, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 8792 times:

Quoting LongHauler (Reply 8):
One of the requirements before receiving an entrance into an Aviation College or University in Canada, is passing a medical to ATPL standards.

I have no doubts that I can get the medical at my age today, but what I meant was what happens if ten years down the road something happens, and I am no longer fit to fly. That is the only reason why I am reluctant to go into an aviation program.


User currently offlineLongHauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 5132 posts, RR: 43
Reply 10, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 8661 times:

Quoting BowflexBrennan (Reply 9):
I have no doubts that I can get the medical at my age today, but what I meant was what happens if ten years down the road something happens, and I am no longer fit to fly. That is the only reason why I am reluctant to go into an aviation program.

That chance/risk is the same chance/risk that EVERY airline pilot has taken.



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 11, posted (8 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days ago) and read 8610 times:

Quoting BowflexBrennan (Reply 6):
I see what you mean. I never really thought of that aspect, because if for some reason I can't get my medical, then I'm screwed and I'll have wasted all that money.

More like if your employer goes belly up, chapter 11, laid-off or shuts down you'll have something to fall back on. The job market for pilots is still very weak at best. There are still thousands of pilots still on lay off or not in a flying job because of the current airline situations. Also, most pilots change jobs and are laid off 3-4 times in a career.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
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