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What Is The Oldest 747 In Service Today?  
User currently offlineBoeing747-400 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (13 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 4018 times:

Is it that one that UPS operates? Or is it N601US, Northwest 747-100?

What is the oldest?

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineIndianGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (13 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3917 times:

In passenger service, i heard it was a TWA jet. dunno the reg.

User currently offlineModesto2 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2795 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (13 years 11 months 2 weeks ago) and read 3902 times:

TWA still operates the 747?

User currently offlineKROC From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (13 years 11 months 2 weeks ago) and read 3908 times:

TWA doesn't operate the 747 anymore.

User currently offlineSouthflite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (13 years 11 months 2 weeks ago) and read 3877 times:

Oldest B747 still in service is indeed the UPS one, N691UP, which was LN 7, which first flew with Pan Am as N734PA (FF 31OCT69).

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Photo © Simon Ng


The oldest B747 in pax service was until recently Tower Air's N603FF (ex-DLH D-ABYA, LN 12, FF 18FEB70). When they ceased operations, Tower had oldest pax B747s #'s 1, 3, & 4 on strength !!

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Photo © AirNikon


With Tower's demise, this honour now goes to Northwest's N601US (LN 27, FF 07NOV69), but probably not for long, as this aircraft is due to be retired ...

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Photo © Mark Abbott


When she goes, the next in line is her 200-series sister, N611US (LN 88, FF 11OCT70), which was also the first B747-200B built.

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Photo © Matthew Lee




User currently offlineJet Setter From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (13 years 11 months 2 weeks ago) and read 3870 times:

Here's the link to the 747 production list where you can get your answer, as it lists the aircraft in the order they were built.
http://airliners.decollage.org/747a.htm
Oldest B747 still flyin is the aircraft from the Seattle Museum of flight (assuming that aircraft is still airworthy!)
Oldest B747 is service is with UPS (Cargo), oldest passenger B747 is with Air France/


User currently offlineDeltAirlines From United States of America, joined May 1999, 8897 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 3843 times:

The 747-100 at Seattle Musuem of Flight has no engines.


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Photo © Axel Juengerich



Jeff


User currently offlineBa4521 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3809 times:

Hasn't the Museum of Flight 747 been leased in recent years for engine test flights? ...not least by Boeing for tests on the 777 P+W engines in the 1990's? (if so, the airframe must still be airworthy, engines attached or not).
What has happened to (much unloved [allegedly]) Tower Air 747s?

Martin


User currently offlineBa4521 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3807 times:

Hasn't the Museum of Flight 747 been leased in recent years for engine test flights? ...not least by Boeing for tests on the 777 P+W engines in the 1990's? (if so, the airframe must still be airworthy, engines attached or not).
What has happened to (much unloved [allegedly]) Tower Air 747s?

Martin


User currently offlineFBWless From Sweden, joined Feb 2000, 197 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 3792 times:

Why would any pass operator go with a 747 that is more than 30 years old ? These birds are detined for cargo only ......


User currently offlinePhilB From Ireland, joined May 1999, 2915 posts, RR: 13
Reply 10, posted (13 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 3780 times:

Whilst Southflite's answer is both comprehensive and my records show it is pretty accurate, the original question is invalid as it is incomplete.

When will enthusiasts learn that you cannot "age" an aircraft by using the term "oldest". In aviation it is meaningless.

Airframes (not aircraft because engines and other parts get changed) have a number of clocks running.

The first, only because it applies to pressurised and unpressurised aircraft, is spar life ( and some aircraft can be re-sparred cost effectively).

The next clock, exposure, applies to all airframes and various anti corrosion treatments and replacement parts can keep that one ticking for years.

The first two clocks can, therefore be "rewound" and this explains how the DC3 and other unpressurised aircraft keep flying in numbers and why some of the big prop water bombers, which are never now pressurised, keep flying.

The remaining clocks apply to all pressurised aircraft. Each airframe has a "life" determined by the manufacturer and, in many cases, this gets extended as the type ages and various extensions are worked in.
The life is finite, however, and is measured by three clocks:

Rotations, i.e how many times an aircraft has been pressurised/depressurised

Hours flown.

Actual calendar age.

The last is the least significant and only comes into play for marketing purposes when it gets around that XXX airlines is flying 25 year old aircraft and the "Gee Wilma, you ain't flying with them, I change may car every two years" syndrome sets in.

Short haul aircraft do more rotations than long haul aircraft and tend to do less hours than long haul aircraft which have less rotations for more hours.

So, a B737 and a B747 both built in 1970 and both having "normal" major airline careers would end with vastly different hours and rotations at the time of scrapping.

747s have been getting over 100,000 hours but only 23,000 or so rotations. The 737s have been doing around 60,000 hours and up to 40,000 rotations.

Given the intensity of 737 operation against that of the 747, it is likely that the 737 would be scrapped before the 747.

A 747 can easily be 30 years old and, if properly maintained and used on long haul exclusively, have a very high number of hours yet be "young" in terms of rotations.

The same applieds to Concorde. If they ever fly again, the BA aircraft, though 25 years old, are only at mid life, the under used Air France machines are "younger".

All Concordes are used on a phased basis and the high time aircraft has only 24,000 or so hours out of the currently projected 40,000 hours.


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