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Aircraft Registration  
User currently offlineEastern023 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 871 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 5225 times:

How does this work?. Are they by country. How are they assigned. What letters and number combos belong to what country. Confused.


AA will Rise Again!
15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6372 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (8 years 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 5213 times:

Yes, it is by country. It is also subject to various treaties which are maintained by the ICAO.

In the United States, the registration prefix is "N". This letter signifies an aircraft registered in the united states. The rules after that are:

1) It must have at least one number
2) It can end in one or two letters
3) The total registration, after the "N", can have up to five characters

So, for example N1KE , N1, N6692S, N62407, N734KU are all valid registrations. N12BRE would NOT be valid.

You can request a "custom" tail number from the FAA for $15-it is often more expensive to paint the tail number on the aircraft than to get a requested regestration [which, by the way, is required by law as soon as the FAA approves the registration]

If, for example, you are an aircraft manufacturer, or a homebuilder, and you don't care what your tail number is, when you apply for aircraft registration, you can request an "in sequence" number, which will be automatically issued by the FAA (these are usually full-length tail numbers, being all numeric or ending with one letter at the end).

That's my area of expertise I'm sure other people will chime in on this subject...

EDIT: D'oh! Spelling mistake...

[Edited 2006-08-24 20:26:39]


Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineOV735 From Estonia, joined Jan 2004, 909 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (8 years 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 5207 times:

Most common registrations are the ones in a form of:
XX-YYY where XX marks the country and YYY the particular aircraft.

Some countries operate a different rego system:
X-YYYY, where X is again (a single-letter) the country code, and YYYY defines the particular aircraft.

Russia, and most of the CIS republics, operate this kind of rego system:
XX-65783, where XX is the country code, the first two digits (65 in this case) indicate the aircraft type and the last trhee digits say the aircraft ID.

The US, for some reason, operates a completely different system:
N123AA, where N means it's an American aircraft, 123 means god knows what, and AA means god knows what else. Big grin  duck 

Hope this helps.
OV735


User currently offlineAmazonphil From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 561 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 5207 times:

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 1):
2) It can end in one or two letters

And, it can end in all numbers.



If it ain't Boeing, I ain't goeing!
User currently offlineBrick From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 1581 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (8 years 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 5153 times:

N numbers (United States) and JA numbers (Japan) do not use a dash (-). For example, you'll never see N-101AA. HL numbers (I forget which country it is assigned to) have no dash as well.

Pretty much all other registrations use their country code followed by a dash. For example, I-DUPO, B-HOA, and etc...



A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man...
User currently offlineDALMD88 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2544 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (8 years 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 5138 times:

Quoting OV735 (Reply 2):

The US, for some reason, operates a completely different system:
N123AA, where N means it's an American aircraft, 123 means god knows what, and AA means god knows what else.

In the eyes of the FAA the numbers and letters don't mean anything. To the operator they may ID the owner and maybe a series of aircraft.


User currently offlineMPDPilot From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 991 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 5138 times:

Quoting OV735 (Reply 2):
The US, for some reason, operates a completely different system:
N123AA, where N means it's an American aircraft, 123 means god knows what, and AA means god knows what else.

in this case the AA means that it is probably an American Airlines aircraft, some airlines have their ship numbers match the numbers on the registration but this is not necessary. for most airplanes the registration means nothing but for airlines they typically have some meaning.



One mile of highway gets you one mile, one mile of runway gets you anywhere.
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6372 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (8 years 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 5125 times:

Quoting DALMD88 (Reply 5):
In the eyes of the FAA the numbers and letters don't mean anything.

When the tower tells you to call them after taxiing in, or the local Flight Standards District Office sends you certified mail saying that Farmer Brown saw your tail number flying dangerously low over his property, and that you have 96 hours to respond, with a report, to your FSDO, you better believe that the N number means something!

EDIT: Also, for most private operators, ATC tracks the flight based on the tail number, so, for example, A Cessna 172 with the tail number N2809Q would be "Cessna two eight zero niner Quebec" when operating "in the system."

[Edited 2006-08-24 22:35:44]


Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineOB1504 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 3332 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (8 years 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 5108 times:

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 1):

So, for example N1KE , N1, N6692S, N62407, N734KU are all valid registrations.

Actually, you'll never see registration numbers N1-N99 on a privately-owned aircraft, since these registrations are reserved exclusively for the FAA.


User currently offlineRayPettit From United Kingdom, joined May 2002, 608 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (8 years 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 5103 times:

Here is a useful link for starters

http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/history/q0257.shtml

From memory, in the very early days single letter prefixes were used, but then they soon run out! A number of countries have changed prefixes over the years.

Many countries have their own sub-systems. For example Germany, (D-) take note of weight for the second letter, so all airliners above a certain size are D-Axxx.

France (F-) have used F-A, F-B, F-G, and currently F-H for mainstream allocation, with F-W for trials, F-O for overseas based etc.

The UK (G-) started as G-Exxx but was replaced very early on by G-Axxx until that series ran out and followed on with G-B and now G-C. These were always allocated in strict sequence (G-ARTX, G-ARTY etc.) Until the 1970's it was very rare to see an out of sequence registration and those issued were generally marks that would have been allocated not too far ahead. But now, customised registrations are pretty standard.

Smaller UK colonies used registrations in the VP-, VQ- and VR- series, but the third letter was used for each colony. VR-B used to be Bermuda, and VR-C the Cayman Islands.

Here's a list of historical ones

http://www.airlinecodes.co.uk/regprefixhis.asp

Ray


User currently offlineAmazonphil From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 561 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (8 years 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 5089 times:

For Brazil in the past the PP, PR letters were usually reserved for airlines or commercial operators while PT numbers were for General Aviation. This may have changed in recent years. Our C-185s along the Amazon River area where we live are PT-DNY and PT-CJG.

amazonphil



If it ain't Boeing, I ain't goeing!
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6372 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (8 years 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 5066 times:

Mexico uses the following registration system (as I recall):

XA- letter  letter  letter : Airliner
XB- letter  letter  letter : Commercial operator
XC- letter  letter  letter : General Aviation



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineNorthStarDC4M From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 3012 posts, RR: 37
Reply 12, posted (8 years 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 5049 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CHAT OPERATOR

and just before someone else does:

Canada uses C-Fxxx (pka CF-xxx) and C-Gxxx for Certified Aircraft, C-Ixxx and C-Jxxx for ultralights, home builds and other hobby aircraft, C-Hxxx for Hovercraft. C-Kxxx is supposedly to be used by Airships, but i dont think it has ever been used. Balloons are supposedly being moved to a new series soon as well, C-Lxxx?

And we also have the interesting "non-conforming" countries:

Cuba= CU-Tnnnn for "civil" aircraft.
Venezuela= YV-nn(n)-A/B/C
China has a real mix: B-xxx for HKG and Macau, B-nnnn for mainland, B-nnnnn for Taiwan which used to use B-nnn... ok my head hurts.
most of the CIS nations use something like (Using Kazakhstan as an example) UN-nnnnn for russian types and UN-xxx for newer western types... Why they dont just use one or the other? Probably to let airlines save money on painting out the old soviet/aeroflot regs (CCCP-nnnnn).



Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 22924 posts, RR: 20
Reply 13, posted (8 years 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 5040 times:

Quoting Brick (Reply 4):
HL numbers (I forget which country it is assigned to) have no dash as well.

HL is South Korea

Quoting MPDPilot (Reply 6):
in this case the AA means that it is probably an American Airlines aircraft,

You have to be a little careful with this, as a lot of N6XXUS birds are NW 747s, and N501US through N549US are NW 752s.

I also don't think the existence or lack of a dash matters; it's just a style thing. For example, Chilean aircraft are registered CC-XXX, but you won't find any Canadian aircraft registered C-CXXX.



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlineAmazonphil From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 561 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (8 years 1 week 3 hours ago) and read 5023 times:

Colombia and Ecuador could get confusing if you weren't paying attention

Colombia--HK-XXXX

Ecuador--HC-XXXX



If it ain't Boeing, I ain't goeing!
User currently offlineAC320tech From Canada, joined Jul 2006, 197 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (8 years 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 4972 times:

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 12):
Canada uses C-Fxxx (pka CF-xxx) and C-Gxxx for Certified Aircraft

A friend of mine works in Transport Canada and we ran out of C-F--- combos, its now C-G--- combos.


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