Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
What Costs Are Involved In A Medical Diversion?  
User currently offlineMSPCRJ200 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 60 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 3 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 4178 times:

We hear about them all the time. Yesterday an LH 744 landed here at MSP on its way to DEN with a heart attack victim. What costs do you think are involved in these situations? Obviously a fuel/weight recalc and a fuel dump if necessary come into play, but what about ground services, landing fees or others? Does this become a humanitarian services donation or does someone try to make money from an unfortunate incident?

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTheSunseeker From Netherlands, joined Apr 2006, 218 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 3 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 4082 times:

There have been many emergency landings the last weeks.
Perhabs landing is cheaper/free when declaring an emergency jk  Silly



RSA: Dont drink and drive - take the train and get mugged
User currently offlineAirEMS From United States of America, joined May 2004, 684 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3980 times:

Bounce this thought around.. Do the costs of an emergency landing out weigh the possible lawsuit if the pilots don't land and something happens i.e. the pax dies. Welcome to the lawsuit happy world we live in

-Carl



If Your Dying Were Flying
User currently offlineBoeing757/767 From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 2282 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3963 times:

I've been on a flight that was diverted for medical reasons. While worth it if a life is saved, the costs are plenty. In addition to ones you raised (landing fees, fuel, etc.):

-- Cost of misconnecting passengers (are hotel needed, staff time to reacommodate, etc.)
-- Crew time: will new crew be needed because crew time has expired?
-- Ground services, especially if aircraft lands at an airport where the aircraft or airline is not common.

There are others, but it adds up pretty fast.



Free-thinking, left-leaning secularist
User currently offlineUadc8contrail From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1782 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3963 times:

my uncle retired off the 744 at united in 02 and he did the ord-hkg runs quite a bit and he told me that it was in the 50k range to put it down in pek whether it be for a medical divert or to get more gas, he did divert there a few times for fuel and thats what he was being told by dispatch. where im at if a wn or jet blue divert here...they are charged triple the landing rate as they are not a signatory carrier(do not serve this airport)plus fuel and other cost asscoiated with the divert(crew time and the legalities with that)


bus driver.......move that bus:)
User currently offlineAirfoilsguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3956 times:

Does the passenger with the medical problem get billed for the extra expense?

User currently offlineTrekster From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3951 times:

Quoting Airfoilsguy (Reply 5):

You are joking right?


User currently offlineMD88Captain From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1335 posts, RR: 20
Reply 7, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 3925 times:

The costs of a medical diversion are right there in the cost of a ticket. An airline can give you the average number of medical diversions per 100,000hrs and can break down the stats by fleet types, pairings, etc. The guy with the chest pains in 4c is costing you money and time. It is just a fact of life and a cost of doing business.

User currently offlineAirfoilsguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 3900 times:

Quoting Trekster (Reply 6):
You are joking right?

No, why do you ask? If I am in a car accident and get life flighted I have to pay for it. Why should the airline have to foot the bill for someones medical condition. If the airline caused the medical problem they should have to pay other wise it should be the patients responsibility. This would discourage late term pregnancies and people who have medical conditions who really shouldn't fly from flying.


User currently offlineRobertS975 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 951 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 3890 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

The costs of medical diversions are quite considerable, and the airlines now have a contracted outfit to give medical advice to the crew to supplement any onboard medical expertise that may be present.

User currently offlineDavidT From Switzerland, joined Oct 2005, 477 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 3876 times:

Quoting Airfoilsguy (Reply 8):
Why should the airline have to foot the bill for someones medical condition.

Goodwill?

Also, diversions are normally not at the request of the pax? So if some poor guy gets sent a £50,000 bill for a heart attack he didn't know he was going to have, there's going to be a lot of negative press.


User currently offlineEWRandMDW From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 416 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 3832 times:

On Aug 10 (the day of the London scare) I flew on WN1815 SEA-MDW. As it happened, an older gentleman showed signs of what the crew thought might be a heart attack. The FAs asked over the PA if there was a physician on board. As it happens, the man sitting next to me was and he went forward to tend to the sick man. It turns out all the standing and other stresses brought on by the enhanced security protocols got the better of him and he developed shortness of breath and lightheadedness. The MD assured the flight crew there was nothing major to worry about so we continued on to Midway. On landing, an EMT crew was there to check the passenger out.

There was a real possibility of detouring to somewhere in Wyoming or South Dakota, but the physician's assurance the passenger would be OK was enough to keep us on course to Chicago. I'm now wondering, IF this passenger later developed greater medical problems because of not making an emergency landing somewhere, who would be liable, the airline, the MD or a combination of the two?


User currently offlineMSPCRJ200 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 60 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 3815 times:

So part of my orignal question: do airports waive landing fees in situations such as this?

User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5527 posts, RR: 56
Reply 13, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 3789 times:

Quoting AirEMS (Reply 2):
Do the costs of an emergency landing out weigh the possible lawsuit if the pilots don't land and something happens i.e. the pax dies. Welcome to the lawsuit happy world we live in



Quoting EWRandMDW (Reply 11):
IF this passenger later developed greater medical problems because of not making an emergency landing somewhere, who would be liable, the airline, the MD or a combination of the two?

At CO, as well as other airlines, we subscribe to a service called MedLink (a service of MedAire). It is based out of Banner Good Samaritan Medical Centre here in Phoenix. Whenever we have a sick customer or someone needing any type or medical assistance, we call them. Once a call has been initiated, they then assume responsibility for diverting, not diverting, getting assistance at the destination, getting assistance at the place of diversion and so on. They also assume responsibility for medical assistance that takes place onboard, but, again, they need to be called first.

As for the costs involved with landing fees, putting people up in hotels if the crew goes illegal, etc., that I am not sure. Probably the airline eats that.



You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineJpax From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1020 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (8 years 3 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 3788 times:

Quoting MSPCRJ200 (Reply 12):
So part of my orignal question: do airports waive landing fees in situations such as this?

If they are not a carrier at the diversion airport:

Quoting MSPCRJ200 (Reply 12):
they are charged triple the landing rate as they are not a signatory carrier(do not serve this airport)

No clue about if they are a carrier...


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
What Aircraft Are Hot In The Secondhand Market? posted Sun Apr 17 2005 22:52:29 by Cumulonimbus
Scenario: What If Ryanair Involved In An Accident? posted Tue May 7 2002 22:25:23 by Ndebele
Wondering What Songs Are Used In Airline TV Ads? posted Wed Dec 12 2001 17:33:53 by Squigee
What Airlines Are Not In An Alliance posted Tue Jan 2 2001 19:19:24 by JAT
What Involved In A 1st Class Medical? posted Tue Jun 4 2002 00:30:09 by Omegous
Flts From CAI: What Are Top 5 In Terms Of Loads... posted Fri Mar 11 2005 12:33:38 by Pe@rson
What Charter Airlines Are Left In The USA? posted Sat Dec 11 2004 23:28:43 by Akjetblue
What Group Are The Other Airlines In? posted Tue Aug 3 2004 19:24:52 by BoeingPride800
What Airports Are In Need Of Remodeling posted Sun Feb 15 2004 07:28:15 by KLM11
All The Costs Involved In A Commercial Airline Fli posted Sat Mar 9 2002 10:08:40 by LanPeru