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What Airplane Did AA Call "stretch"?  
User currently offlineUnited787 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2641 posts, RR: 2
Posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 3467 times:

I remember back in the 80's flying American Airlines and on the safety card they called the airplane the 7X7 Stretch. I seem to remember the 737, is that right? Was it the 727? Does anyone remember? Was it even AA?

5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFlyTPA From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 135 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 3447 times:

Yes, it was the Boeing 727-223 (72S). I flew on them many times as a kid. I think I may even have one of the safety cards lying around somewhere.


Signore e signori-benvenuti a bordo questo volo per l'Italia!
User currently offlineUnited787 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2641 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 3416 times:

Quoting FlyTPA (Reply 1):
Yes, it was the Boeing 727-223 (72S).

Thank you. I remember always amazed at how looooooong that aircraft was. I think I remember thinking they literally stretched it on a machine.


User currently offlineTango-Bravo From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 3788 posts, RR: 29
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 3350 times:

Quoting United787 (Thread starter):
I remember back in the 80's flying American Airlines and on the safety card they called the airplane the 7X7 Stretch.

Seems from the "X" that the card was designed for more than one variant of the same aircraft type.

Quoting United787 (Thread starter):
I seem to remember the 737, is that right?

Interesting to note that United had common safety cards for their 737-200/300/500 aircraft, made possible by the fact that doors and overwing emergency exit plugs were in the same locations and of the same type on all three variants. Therefore, it is possible that the aircraft referenced may have been a 737-300; AA operated ex-Air Cal 737-200s and -300s (in full AA livery) for several years after acquiring Air Cal in 1988. On the other hand, the 727-100 and -200 types used by AA in the 1980s did not have the same door arrangements and therefore could noy have used a common safey card.

[Edited 2006-09-01 20:11:42]

User currently offlineUnited787 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2641 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 3076 times:

Quoting Tango-Bravo (Reply 3):
Seems from the "X" that the card was designed for more than one variant of the same aircraft type.

I added the X because I couldn't remember which plane it was. I think FlyTPA is correct, it is the 727-200.


User currently offlineTango-Bravo From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 3788 posts, RR: 29
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 2970 times:

Quoting United787 (Reply 4):
I added the X because I couldn't remember which plane it was. I think FlyTPA is correct, it is the 727-200.

Indeed I very much recall that the 727-200 was commonly referred to as a "727 Stretch" or simply "Stretch" for some years after the type entered service in 1967. At the time, it was a dramatic stretch (20') of an existing design. I clearly remember the first time I noticed a 727 that seemed to be longer -- I even asked someone if it was a 727 to which the reply was "it's a 727 Stretch." Even after McDonnell-Douglas rewrote the definition of "stretch" with its DC-8-61/63 series (37' longer than its DC-8 predecessors) the 727-200 continued to be known as a "Stretch" at the same time the longer DC-8s were more commonly known as a "Stretch Eight."

In all of my memory, there was never such a reference to the 737-300 (or even the later 737-800/900) when comparing it to a 737-100/200 or when comparing the DC-9-80/MD-80 to earlier, much shorter, DC-9 variants. By then, airframe "stretch" had become so commonplace as to render the term almost meaningless when referring to various airliners.


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