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What Is This By The Window Of This TU-154?  
User currently offlineCsavel From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1365 posts, RR: 4
Posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 7397 times:

IN this interior shot of this Kras Air Tu-154 below you will notice on either side just in front of the emergency exits, what looks like a filing cabinet with imitation wood grain (??) where the window seat should be.
I thought at first that someone was transporting something and taking advantage of the two across seating roominess like the seat behind but they look like exactly the same things on both sides, and also appear, although it is hard to tell sort of attached to the plane.

Does anyone know what it is?


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Sorry if this has been asked, I wouldn't even know what search terms to search under.


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20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBluewhale18210 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 237 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 7391 times:

Quoting Csavel (Thread starter):

Probably emergency equipments of sorts.



JPS on A300-600RF A319/320 B737-400/800 B757-200F B767-300F CRJ-200/900. Looking to add more.
User currently offlineRedChili From Norway, joined Jul 2005, 2300 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 7372 times:

It's where they store the evacuation slides.


Top 10 airplanes: B737, T154, B747, IL96, T134, IL62, A320, MD80, B757, DC10
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 7321 times:

Looks like a Storage Cabinet used by the Crew for Emergency Equipment.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineRedChili From Norway, joined Jul 2005, 2300 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 7277 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 3):
Looks like a Storage Cabinet used by the Crew for Emergency Equipment.

As I already said, it's for the slide. I've been sitting next to this box on several flights, reading the instructions on how to operate it.



Top 10 airplanes: B737, T154, B747, IL96, T134, IL62, A320, MD80, B757, DC10
User currently offlineVasu From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 3921 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 7274 times:

This is probably a stupid question...

but if the slide is kept in a box inside the aircraft, how does it deploy outside the aircraft?


User currently offlineRedChili From Norway, joined Jul 2005, 2300 posts, RR: 5
Reply 6, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 7247 times:

Quoting Vasu (Reply 5):
but if the slide is kept in a box inside the aircraft, how does it deploy outside the aircraft?

I don't remember all details, as it is a few years since I read the instructions, but it goes something like this:

Pull the handle in front of the box so that the front panel comes down 90 degrees and lies flat on the floor. The slide sits on top (inside) of that panel. After you have opened and removed the emergency exit, pulling another handle will inflate the slide, which automatically flies out the door.



Top 10 airplanes: B737, T154, B747, IL96, T134, IL62, A320, MD80, B757, DC10
User currently offlineBoeing4ever From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 6973 times:

Quoting RedChili (Reply 6):
Pull the handle in front of the box so that the front panel comes down 90 degrees and lies flat on the floor. The slide sits on top (inside) of that panel. After you have opened and removed the emergency exit, pulling another handle will inflate the slide, which automatically flies out the door.

Is there a safety mechanism that prevents accidental deployment should say the door still be closed? Considering F/A mishaps on US and European jets, I wonder what would happen if a passenger got bored...

 airplane B4e-Forever New Frontiers airplane 


User currently offlineEos757 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 6944 times:

This appears to be similar to the configuration of the evacuation slide on Fokker 28 aircraft at door 1R.

On the F28, the slide pack is contained inside a "cabinet" adjacent to the door. In an evacuation, the door is opened and the slide pack is manually pulled from the cabinet. Now it is lying across the door sill.

The slide pack is then pushed or kicked out of the aircraft. It is this action which inflates the slide once it falls out. It is for this reason (on F28 anyhow), the slide cannot be inflated inside the aircraft.


User currently offlineAfay1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 1293 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 6896 times:

Sometimes the Tu-154 box is also a lot shorter, but wider, and takes up the place of a seat so makes a handy footrest. You aren't likely to survive a crash anyway, so who really cares if it is complicated? The Tu-134 has a knotted rope underneath the mid-cabin emergency exit seats that you are supposed to throw out over the wing....

User currently offlineJunction From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 768 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 6827 times:

Notice how the passengers on either side next to the slide box are taking advantage of the extra surface to put their drinks. So much for looking out the window.

User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9661 posts, RR: 52
Reply 11, posted (8 years 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 6595 times:

Quoting Boeing4ever (Reply 7):
Is there a safety mechanism that prevents accidental deployment should say the door still be closed? Considering F/A mishaps on US and European jets, I wonder what would happen if a passenger got bored...

Slides on Tupolevs are not fully automatic like on Airbus and Boeing planes. Not only do you need to manually remove it from the storage container, but you must also initiate the inflation by properly causing it to inflate. I spoke with a flight attendant on an Aeroflot Tu154 a few months ago and she explained the process to me, which seemed horribly complicated. I don't feel as safe in those planes for this reason especially. In an emergency, it would be quiet difficult for someone not familiar with the exit to operate it correctly while panicking in the aftermath of an incident. It is no where near as easy as pull the cover off and pull the handle or just rotate a lever like on Airbus or Boeing planes.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 12, posted (8 years 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 6398 times:

Quoting RedChili (Reply 4):
it's for the slide

Do you mean Raft.As the Slide needs to be door mounted & armed to deploy on Emergency Door Opening.
Im Surprised an Emergency would give that comfort level.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineRedChili From Norway, joined Jul 2005, 2300 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (8 years 1 week 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 6276 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 12):
Do you mean Raft.As the Slide needs to be door mounted & armed to deploy on Emergency Door Opening.
Im Surprised an Emergency would give that comfort level.

No, I mean slide. RoseFlyer explained in reply 11 that the slides on Tupolevs are not fully automatic.



Top 10 airplanes: B737, T154, B747, IL96, T134, IL62, A320, MD80, B757, DC10
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 14, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 6051 times:

Quoting RedChili (Reply 13):
RoseFlyer explained in reply 11 that the slides on Tupolevs are not fully automatic

Whats the Regulatory Authority Justification for Emergency.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineVasu From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 3921 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (8 years 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 5855 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 11):
Not only do you need to manually remove it from the storage container, but you must also initiate the inflation by properly causing it to inflate

... with a foot-pump?!


User currently offlineLH526 From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 2372 posts, RR: 14
Reply 16, posted (8 years 1 week 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 5784 times:
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FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting Vasu (Reply 15):
... with a foot-pump?!

Guess an CO2 bottle or whatever would do the job

Mario
LH526



Trittst im Morgenrot daher, seh ich dich im Strahlenmeer ...
User currently offlineDIA From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 3273 posts, RR: 28
Reply 17, posted (8 years 1 week 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 5756 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 11):
Not only do you need to manually remove it from the storage container, but you must also initiate the inflation by properly causing it to inflate. I spoke with a flight attendant on an Aeroflot Tu154 a few months ago and she explained the process to me, which seemed horribly complicated. I don't feel as safe in those planes for this reason especially. In an emergency, it would be quiet difficult for someone not familiar with the exit to operate it correctly while panicking in the aftermath of an incident.

Seems to me that safety was an afterthought on these a/c. Not very smart...and not very safe.



Ding! You are now free to keep supporting Frontier.
User currently offlineAfay1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 1293 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (8 years 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 5709 times:

One has to keep in mind the Soviet mentality that went into their design. Crashes were an embarrasment and the less information about it, the better. There is also an undercurrent of fatalism on the part of Russians that sometimes leads to a lack of safety (Masha Gessen from the Moscow Times has written at length about this).

While the majority of the carriers operating this aircraft today have an obvious interest in safety, the limitations of the design remain. There are of course some design decisions made with older Western aircraft, like the exploding 747 center fuel-tank, that perhaps weren't the greatest. There are also several American airlines that have made conscious decisions to compromise safety, such as Alaska and their (lack of) MD-80 maintenance, the lazy DC-10 engine installations, etc. etc...


User currently offlineDIA From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 3273 posts, RR: 28
Reply 19, posted (8 years 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 5678 times:

Quoting Afay1 (Reply 18):
the lazy DC-10 engine installations

Agreed. But this also makes me think of the (previous) faulty A330 engine installation design that led to the "Canadian glider" event. Yes, it happens...worldwide.



Ding! You are now free to keep supporting Frontier.
User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9661 posts, RR: 52
Reply 20, posted (8 years 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 5585 times:

Quoting Vasu (Reply 15):
Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 11):
Not only do you need to manually remove it from the storage container, but you must also initiate the inflation by properly causing it to inflate

... with a foot-pump?!

Haha, no. From what I understand it is a hose attachment to some pressurized air source. I'm guessing that there is either an air tank or a pump installed in the closet. I haven't looked and am no expert on this, I have just seen it on a plane and asked how it worked.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
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