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UA 757 Loses Engine, Lands In CLE  
User currently offlineRedngold From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 6907 posts, RR: 45
Posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2779 times:

Apparently a United Airlines 757 "lost an engine" during a flight from BOS-SLC. Unfortunately the news bulletin I read (at http://www.newsnet5.com ) has not been updated since it was posted at 1:14 PM EDT.

There was no information specifying whether the engine dropped off the wing or whether it was a mere engine shutdown.

The plane made an emergency at KCLE/Hopkins International Airport.

If anyone has any additional information, please post here.

Thanks,
redngold


Up, up and away!
18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBoeing727 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 950 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2647 times:

http://www.newsnet5.com/news/stories/news-20001005-115725.html

Boeing727

PS: Investigation continues...


User currently offlineDeltaAir From United States of America, joined May 1999, 1094 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 2572 times:

Updates are coming in Slowly.......

The aircraft had only one engine upon landing, oops. The aircraft had no problems landing and did so safely at CLE.


User currently offlineILUV767 From United States of America, joined May 2000, 3141 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 2566 times:

When it is sad that an engine is lost in flight, they mean an engine failure. The landed the plane with only one operational engine.

This will be my dad's other big headache at work tonight. He deals with the repair out out of service planes.

U N I T E D


User currently offlineHypermike From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 1001 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 2551 times:

>> The plane orginally had two engines.

That was worth a good chuckle.


User currently offlineA330300 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 172 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2494 times:

The News was incorrect- It was actually a Delta 757 (Flight 1053) that made the emergency landing in CLE. It appears that there was a "mechanical failure".

User currently offlineIn2flying From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 66 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 2458 times:

Question:

If, at an altitude of lets say 35,000 feet, and over land and hopefully nearby a capable airport, Can a airplane maintain flight by gliding without both engines.

This question may seem moronic but I would like to know the likely scenario if both engines were to go.
The obvious scenario is crash but I would like to hear of any sucessful scenarios.

Thanks and happy flying.



User currently offlineIlyushin96M From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2609 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 2437 times:

Yeah, actually, they can maintain somewhat of a glide and not go into a free-fall. There are two such incidents I know of - a TACA 737-400 that made an emergency landing in a grassy area after losing both engines (I can't remember the location) and was later flown out, and the Gimli Glider, an Air Canada Boeing 767-200 that lost power to both engines and made an emergency landing on a deserted airstrip. The latter especially is a pretty amazing story!


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Photo © Ted Quackenbush



User currently offlineIn2flying From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 66 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2410 times:

Thanks for the reply. Both are pretty amazing. I imagine weather, and location are pretty big contributing factors.

I flew the A310 to Portgual from Newark and wasnt thrilled to see only two engines on the plane.

I will say though, the A310 is a great plane to fly on.
( My only Airbus experience to date )



User currently offlineRIX From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 1785 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2388 times:

... and then it was a SAS MD80 that landed after both engines lost power (Dec 1991). The aircraft was terribly damaged but there were no fatalities! It is possible in general (look at the Space Shuttle  ) but depends mostly on pilots skills...

User currently offlineIlyushin96M From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2609 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2388 times:

Yeah, it was damaged terribly...more like broken into three or four pieces! But you're right, it did glide down and crash land on a snow-covered slope. Good thing there weren't many trees or boulders in the way there.

User currently offlineRIX From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 1785 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2368 times:

As far as I know, not 4 but 3 pieces... and isn't it a terrible damage ? Of course, besides the crew skills there must be good fortune...

User currently offlineMls515 From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 3076 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2367 times:

The TACA 737 that lost both engines was on it's way to New Orleans and over the ocean! It made an emergency landing on a long grassy levy that the pilots spotted. They would not have made it to MSY. The aircract appeared to have no damage. I saw this story on TV a couple months ago.

User currently offlineHeavyJet From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2349 times:

>>If, at an altitude of lets say 35,000 feet, and over land and hopefully nearby a capable airport, Can a airplane maintain flight by gliding without both engines<<

In2flying,

Most descents in a jet from high altitude are done at idle thrust. The airplane is quite literally "gliding" at that point. We call that "top of descent". It's a calculated point where we can pull the power to idle and glide down to a much lower altitude. We don't have to touch the power again until we level off at our new altitude.


Modern jet engines are extremely reliable. I've been flying big jets for 15 years and have never (other than the simulator) had one quit or had to shut one down. Most airline pilots can go their entire career without an engine failure.

Losing an engine in a two engine airplane is treated as an emergency by the pilots and ATC simply because you only have 1 running engine left. It's not because the airplane is not capable of sustaining continued flight on one engine, it is. If your down to only one of any major aircraft system it's treated as an emergency by all envolved...it's just precautionary procedure. The chances of losing both of the engines on a flight because of mechanical reasons is astronomical. The airplane can maintain a safe altitude/speed on just one engine.

Aircraft manufacturers do have provisions and procedures in place and pilots are trained in the unlikely event both engines do quit. Flight controls are still being powered, usually through a "RAT" (Ram Air Turbine) that drops down into the slipstream either automatically (B757/767)or manually (A300/310). An APU can be started to provide electrical power to avionics and bleed air for the pressurization.

Unlike what some movies and the media would have you believe, airplanes don't just simply drop out of the sky like an uncontrolled anvil as soon as an engine stops. They just become gliders....much like the space shuttle, only with better glide ratios!  


User currently offlineShawn Patrick From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 2607 posts, RR: 17
Reply 14, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2318 times:

you bonehead!

User currently offlineRedngold From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 6907 posts, RR: 45
Reply 15, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2278 times:

Thanks to all who sent in updates. I suppose Newsnet5.com was too embarrassed by its initial mistakes to update the story... And I appreciate the explanations.
I guess I should have taken this headline with a grain of salt, too... Based on what I read, as I said in my initial post, I wasn't sure if it was engine failure or actual physical loss.
BTW, Shawn Patrick, your comment is not appreciated at all! I merely repeated the news story. Shame on you for being such a, well, you know. Some of us come here to learn, not be taunted.

redngold



Up, up and away!
User currently offlineZartan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2275 times:

That was a great line in the article, though, about the aircraft "originally" having 2 engines.

User currently offlineKilljoy From Finland, joined Dec 1999, 646 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 2271 times:

Actually, I think there were trees. If I remember correctly it landed in a forest just before a field so that the trees slowed it down, but once it hit the ground it was already over soft, clear ground.

I'm not sure if I'm right about this, though, so somebody correct me if I'm wrong.


User currently offlineVASI From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 192 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 2260 times:

The aircraft crashed three minutes after take off on September the 27nd 1991. Some trees reduced the impact on a field were the MD-81 camo to rest. The cause: Engine No.2 failed, due to Ice ingestion, some seconds later No.1 failed, but not because of the same reason. The reason was the "ATR", the Auto thrust restauration system which caused the No.1 engine to stall. The pilot`s weren´t aware, that MDD has built in this system. The throttle moved automatically to the full thrust position and the pilots tried to move it back, to prevent the engine stall.

VASI


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