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Airplane Registrations  
User currently offlineFL370 From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 252 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 3 months 7 hours ago) and read 2034 times:

how do airlines keep track of what plane is in service?

and why is it that every country and their airlines have different ways of registering their planes.

United states: ex. N777UA, N619UA
Russia: ex: RA-xxxxx Ilyushin, Tupolev


and so forth, how do airlines keep track of all that.


fl370

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12181 posts, RR: 51
Reply 1, posted (8 years 3 months 5 hours ago) and read 2015 times:

Airlines, in the US, usually have seperate ship numbers for each individual airplane. The ship numbers is a maintenance and scheduling function used to track the aircraft for scheduled maintenance and routing. Depending on the airline, it may or may not be connected to the individual registration number.

The aircraft registration numbers are assigned by each country to individual airplanes. The registration is a series of numbers, letters, or a combination of numbers and letters. Each country has been assigned one or more designations to be the first charaters in the registration. For example, N, NC, and NX indicates the airplane is registered in the US, G indicated the UK, F for France, C for Canada, and RA for Russia. It is very similar to registering your car, except the registration does not expire. It also indicated the national minimum maintenance standards the aircraft is suppose to be maintaned to to keep it's individual air worthyness certificate. Although, today, most countries have very similar minimum maintenance standards. These standards do not include higher maintenance standards required on spiecfic aircraft, such as ETOPS requirements (which do not apply to all twin jet aircraft).


User currently offline3201 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (8 years 3 months 4 hours ago) and read 2004 times:

Quoting FL370 (Thread starter):
how do airlines keep track of what plane is in service?

Software that looks like a giant gannt chart. Individual aircraft are rows, and time marches from left to right. Both flights and maintenance events are shown in the rows -- so a colored bar shows the departure airport, flight number, and arrival airport, the times are indicated by the ends of the bar, and usually the color indicates something about the status (delayed, etc.) and each bar can be expanded for more information. A maintenance event bar starts and ends at the same airport and otherwise looks like a flight (but probably a different color). Before they were software, it might have been a wall in an ops center with plates moved around kinda like non-electronic gate podiums where they slide in the flight number and cities for the next flight. Now that it's electronic they can easily do things like swap two aircraft ("tails") to do each others' flights, etc., and the system keeps track of maintenance requirements (this tail can only do X more hours before it needs Y kind of check).

Generally, tails are assigned to rotations periodicaly, adjustments are made as aircraft develop problems or swaps are made to compensate for delays/cancellations, and then everything gets re-assigned as the next planning period hits, either daily or weekly or monthly or whatever. But there's always visibility via the system.


User currently offlineAnax From Greece, joined Sep 2006, 105 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 3 months 3 hours ago) and read 1973 times:

in greece the registration system has as :

SX is the country's code
then the first letter declares the number of engines of the a/c
the second the sequence of a/c's in the airlines fleet
and the third the the sequence of the specific a/c

ie
SX-DFA (A340-OA) D 4 engines , F for A340 (in OA) , A the first A340 joined the fleet

or SX-BKC B for 2 engines K for 734 in OA , C the third 734 joined the fleet
and so on
 wave 



god is a spotter!!!
User currently offlineSpeedbirdEGJJ From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2003, 432 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (8 years 3 months 2 hours ago) and read 1955 times:

It does vary by airline...

In addition to the Olympic method shown above we have some little quirks with our fleet

Eg G-ZZZ. on the T7's (a play on the fact ZZZ looks like 777)
G-VII also on the T7's (VII been the roman numeral for 7 )
G-CIV on the 744's (IV been the rn for 4)
G-BYG. also on the 744's (self explanitory 'BIG')


User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12181 posts, RR: 51
Reply 5, posted (8 years 3 months 2 hours ago) and read 1950 times:

Quoting SpeedbirdEGJJ (Reply 4):
G-ZZZ. on the T7's (a play on the fact ZZZ looks like 777)
G-VII also on the T7's (VII been the roman numeral for 7 )
G-CIV on the 744's (IV been the rn for 4)
G-BYG. also on the 744's (self explanitory 'BIG')

Ya gotta love that British humor.

 rotfl   rotfl   rotfl 


User currently offlineAerofede From Italy, joined Sep 2006, 25 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 3 months 2 hours ago) and read 1937 times:

Here in Italy you are free to choose the letters of the reg. so everyone can have its own name, but no bad words are permitted.
Airlines usually use part of their 2- or 3-letter code or part of their name (eg: Neos Air 738 are registered I-NEOS -NEOT -NEOU -NEOT -NEOX) while some others have their own system: Alitalia MD-82 are all registered I-DAxx (eg: I-DAWG), B772 and MD-11 are all I-DIxx; B742 were I-DExx; A32x are I-BIxx; E145 are I-EXxx, while E170 are leased and are registered EI-DFx for Eire; ATR are all I-ATxx; Livingston A332 and A321 are registered I-LIVx; and so on.

Private airplane are left to the choice of the owner: for example the Hawkers owned by our ex-PM Silvio Berlusconi are registered I-RONY and I-DEAS.

I know that in Germany the first letter after the D- is based on the airplane weight (I don't remember the exact subdivision): D-Exxx for the smallest; D-Ixxx are most of the light jet and turboprop; while airliners and similar are D-Axxx. Helicopters are all D-Hxxx.

I'm really curious about why some country use number instead of letters


User currently offlineBigOrange From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2375 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (8 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1871 times:

Quoting SpeedbirdEGJJ (Reply 4):
G-CIV on the 744's (IV been the rn for 4)
G-BYG. also on the 744's (self explanitory 'BIG')

I never connected those two sequences with anything. Thanks to A.net I learned something new today.  Smile


User currently offlineKeego From Ireland, joined Jan 2006, 190 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (8 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1840 times:

Aer Lingus have their 330s named after destinations EI serve. EI-DUB Dublin, EI-ORD Chicago O'Hare, EI-JFK Self explanatory, EI-ORK Cork, EI-EWR Newark (Newark is no longer served), EI-LAX Los Angelas & EI-DAA. DAA is not a destination but it is the Dublin Airport Authority. They also had EI-SHN Shannon, but it has been withdrawn form the fleet

[Edited 2006-09-28 17:20:26]

User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6173 posts, RR: 29
Reply 9, posted (8 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1809 times:
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Speaking of registrations how does that work. I have noticed that many, if not all NWA DC-9s have registration numbers from their previous owners; such as Republic, Hughes, Southern, etc. How can these planes keep their numbers over the years, is that because at one time or another those planes were registered to a company that was a predecessor to NWA. I have also flown on one with a registration going back to Eastern, so how did that work?

I have a lithograph of Ozark DC-9-34LR N927L. It flew with that same number with TWA, which I would assume is because TWA bought Ozark. However that plane later flew with Dinar with the same number. How did that work?



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineBond007 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 5455 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (8 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1801 times:

Quoting Falstaff (Reply 9):
Speaking of registrations how does that work. I have noticed that many, if not all NWA DC-9s have registration numbers from their previous owners; such as Republic, Hughes, Southern, etc. How can these planes keep their numbers over the years, is that because at one time or another those planes were registered to a company that was a predecessor to NWA. I have also flown on one with a registration going back to Eastern, so how did that work?

I have a lithograph of Ozark DC-9-34LR N927L. It flew with that same number with TWA, which I would assume is because TWA bought Ozark. However that plane later flew with Dinar with the same number. How did that work?

There is no requirement in the US to re-register an aircraft because of change of ownership.

Some airlines do re-register to be consistent with their current fleet, but many leave them as the original or previous.

No US airlines 'own' registration ranges either. AA just decided to use NnnnAA for example, but you'll find some in that range that are Cessnas or similar that somebody just happened to register as a NnnnAA also.

Jimbo



I'd rather be on the ground wishing I was in the air, than in the air wishing I was on the ground!
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 11, posted (8 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1801 times:

VT-JAL
VT is the Nationality mark &
JAL is the Registration mark.

Some countries have 4 letters in the Registration markings.

Every country Regulatory Authority has an updated list of Aircraft registered in their country.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineBA777ER236 From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2006, 278 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (8 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1789 times:

Quoting SpeedbirdEGJJ (Reply 4):
It does vary by airline...

In addition to the Olympic method shown above we have some little quirks with our fleet

Eg G-ZZZ. on the T7's (a play on the fact ZZZ looks like 777)
G-VII also on the T7's (VII been the roman numeral for 7 )
G-CIV on the 744's (IV been the rn for 4)
G-BYG. also on the 744's (self explanitory 'BIG')

And don't forget:
G-YMM for RR ER T7s (YMM for year 2000 - first delivery)

We also have some quirky individual regs:
G-RAES - GE90 B-Market T7 (Royal Aeronautical Society - would have been
G-VIII i.e. G-8 in roman numerals!)
G-GBTA - 734 (Guild of British Travel Agents)



Flying would be easy if it wasn't for the ground
User currently offlineOlympus69 From Canada, joined Jun 2002, 1737 posts, RR: 7
Reply 13, posted (8 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1756 times:

Quoting Aerofede (Reply 6):
Here in Italy you are free to choose the letters of the reg. so everyone can have its own name, but no bad words are permitted

The registrars may know some English bad words now. But a saw a photo of a sailplane 40 years ago that was registered I-F followed by U, followed by C, followed by K. I hope that will keep the moderators happy.  Smile


User currently offlineBond007 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 5455 posts, RR: 8
Reply 14, posted (8 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1747 times:

Quoting Olympus69 (Reply 13):
The registrars may know some English bad words now. But a saw a photo of a sailplane 40 years ago that was registered I-F followed by U, followed by C, followed by K. I hope that will keep the moderators happy.

Yes, I understand there were some others also...before the authorities realised  Smile

Jimbo



I'd rather be on the ground wishing I was in the air, than in the air wishing I was on the ground!
User currently offlineSilverfox From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1058 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (8 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1731 times:

Years ago, in the UK one of the minor Royals Prince William of Gloucester was a pilot, unfortunateley he was killed in an flying accident

His planes reg was G-AWOG


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