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What's Under The Door?  
User currently offlineC172heavy From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 107 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3473 times:

So what is this? I thought this was where the slides were stowed, but it appears to be a folding ladder, no?


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Photo © Jakub Michalak




"How's that working out for ya?....Bein' clever?"
18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineConcorde01 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 23 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3480 times:

yes it is a folding ladder. the aircraft is equipped with them so they don't have to wait for stairs to be driven next to the door

User currently offlineCHRISBA777ER From UK - England, joined Mar 2001, 5964 posts, RR: 62
Reply 2, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3466 times:

Yes it is - most of the FR 737s have them - means lower airport fees if you dont need a jetway or airstairs.


What do you mean you dont have any bourbon? Do you know how far it is to Houston? What kind of airline is this???
User currently offlineMcdu From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 1436 posts, RR: 17
Reply 3, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3422 times:

The escape slide is visible in this photograph. It is covered by the large platic cover with the circle on it, directly below the door handle. The circle is the PSI gauge that is verfied to be in the green band by the F/A's before dept. The original 737's-100's and 200's came with the airstairs as a standard feature. Not a tremendous amount of jet bridges in the 60's. Once the terminals matured, the airlines removed the airstairs to save weight. You will see a few old 737's running around with a door where the stairs should be but there is nothing in there. Boeing obviously kept the design as an option for those carriers that operate from hardstands more often than not and it appears Ryan is one of them. Personally I liked having stairs as an option. We used to have them on the 737-200's and all of the 727's had aft airstairs. It made a diversion easier as you had a means of easily getting off the airplane to do a walkaround or talk to the fueler.

The gray material that is hanging below the door is the attach mechanism "girt bar". This bar is placed into the floor attach points after the doors are closed, manually on these airplanes, by the crew and that is what the F/A's are doing when you hear "arm doors for departure" announcement in the cabin.

The manual girt bar disappeared after in the 757/767 series were produced but to make sure that SWA can train their trolly dollys to do things one way only they retained this set up on the 737NG's. It is a shame that Boeing did not adopt more improvements in the NG's but SWA throughs a ton of weight around. The airbus and 777 doors (which is a copy of the bus) are superior designs in my opinon but I only open them every nine months in training.


User currently offlineC172heavy From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 107 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 3326 times:

Thanks for the verification. That leads me to ask, can the stairs be deployed from inside the aircraft?


"How's that working out for ya?....Bein' clever?"
User currently offlineC172heavy From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 107 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 3312 times:

Just checked that photo out again....I suppose the crew person was stowing them as the picture was taken, eh?


"How's that working out for ya?....Bein' clever?"
User currently offlineBwaflyer From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2004, 689 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 3198 times:

Before the airstairs were removed on our 737-300s to save weight, we used them at most of the airports we flew to. If the groundstaff only had one set of mobile steps available, we could have them attached to the rear door, and speed up embarkation / disembarkation. On the 737 classics, the stairs are operated by a toggle switch in the ceiling above the door. On the 737 NG, the switch is fitted to the cabin crew panel above the jump seat - you can see the cabin crew member pushing the button in the picture. Our procedure was to crack the door open (turn the operating handle (the big silver handle on the door) and door opens inside the aircraft). We would then operate the stairs so they were fully extended. We'd the push the door open fully, and unfold the hand rails which extended upwards and clip into mounting points inside the door frame. The operation was reversed to close the door. We'd never operate the stairs with the door fully open to avoid accidental falls. The airstairs can also be operated externally via a handle on the bottom of the fuselage. I assume it's in the same location on the NG's which would be under the white sticker in the picture, just aft of the red line painted underneath the door. The stairs can be operated in standby mode when there is no power to the aircraft by drawing power from the batteries

User currently offlineBwaflyer From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2004, 689 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 3016 times:

By the way - pretty much every western aircraft if fitted with slides has them attached to the inside of the door. Two notable exceptions to this are the A321 (2nd and 3rd set of doors) and the upper deck doors on the A380 which have the slides in a compartment underneath the door, and is deployed through an opening in the fuselage - as in the photo below.


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Photo © Janne Laukkonen - FAP



There's a video somewhere showing a Turkish Airlines A321 deploying the slide during maintenance.


User currently offlineGr8Circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2917 times:

Quoting Concorde01 (Reply 1):
yes it is a folding ladder. the aircraft is equipped with them so they don't have to wait for stairs to be driven next to the door

Anyone have a pic of the ladded fully extended out and in use....?  smile 


User currently offlineLVICS From Argentina, joined Aug 2006, 86 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2844 times:

Here you go

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Photo © Ricardo Lin
View Large View Medium
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Photo © Ricardo Lin



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Photo © Ricardo Lin



User currently offlineLegoguy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 3311 posts, RR: 40
Reply 10, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2765 times:

If some airlines prefer not to use airport air stairs due to costs and time, does the weight of the actual stairs onboard the aircraft add extra weight meaning additional fuel costs?

I would presume that it must be cheap to carry the stairs rather than using a set of airport air stairs?



Can you say 'Beer Can' without sounding like a Jamaican saying 'Bacon'?
User currently offlineLovinitflyboy From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2006, 116 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2742 times:

Quoting Bwaflyer (Reply 7):
By the way - pretty much every western aircraft if fitted with slides has them attached to the inside of the door. Two notable exceptions to this are the A321 (2nd and 3rd set of doors) and the upper deck doors on the A380 which have the slides in a compartment underneath the door, and is deployed through an opening in the fuselage

A330, doors 3 are the same as doors 2 and 3 on thr A321, the compartment underneath the door, opens and deploys the slide, possably the same on the A340 doors 3?


User currently offlineCOERJ145 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1421 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2730 times:

Quoting Legoguy (Reply 10):
If some airlines prefer not to use airport air stairs due to costs and time, does the weight of the actual stairs onboard the aircraft add extra weight meaning additional fuel costs?

Yes, I have heard this does add weight and increases fuel costs, which is why most airlines have removed them. I think most NW DC9s had theirs removed to save fuel weight(can anyone confirm this?).


User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1414 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2669 times:

Quoting Mcdu (Reply 3):
to make sure that SWA can train their trolly dollys to do things one way only they retained this set up on the 737NG's. It is a shame that Boeing did not adopt more improvements in the NG's but SWA throughs a ton of weight around.

What makes you think SWA is the reason Boeing didn't change the design? Do you have a credible source?



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineGr8Circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 2441 times:

Quoting LVICS (Reply 9):
Here you go

Thanks!!  wave 


User currently offlineMcdu From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 1436 posts, RR: 17
Reply 15, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2423 times:

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 13):
What makes you think SWA is the reason Boeing didn't change the design? Do you have a credible source?



Boeing tech rep was my source. However, look at the cockpit alone and you can see the items that were WNized for the NG's. There were articles in many of the major aviation weekly publications that detailed how the NG's had to be able to display round dial information because WN refused to teach differences. Also, WN still does not use A/T, VNAV, and prior to MDW crash were not allowed to use Auto Brakes. The entire industry is aware that WN is the largest customer for the airplane and thus they get what they want in terms of development. The problem I have is that WN is refusing technology and design enhancements for the sake of doing things the same way for 30 years, versus adapting new safety features that provide both the passengers and crews a higher level of saftey.

Just ask anyone flying the NG's in the ETOPS enviroment and they will tell you the plane needs a RAT and various other improvements. Right now it must fly ETOPS with the APU running, hardly efficient or wise on a continuous basis. But Boeing built for the largest customer and that is how it works in this industy.


User currently offlineJetMech From Australia, joined Mar 2006, 2637 posts, RR: 53
Reply 16, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2382 times:

I presume that some sort of hinged flapper door opens to allow the retractable airstairs to deploy. Are pressurisation loads imposed directly upon this door when it is closed, or is the retractable airstair enclosed in an airtight cavity within the fuselage?


JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair.
User currently offlineLVICS From Argentina, joined Aug 2006, 86 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2349 times:

Quoting Gr8Circle (Reply 14):
Thanks!!

My pleasure!! Big grin


User currently offlineBwaflyer From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2004, 689 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2275 times:

The door covering the airstairs retracts inside the fuselage and slides down.

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