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Can Anyone Explain Which Airline "owns" A Ticket?  
User currently offline3201 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4308 times:

I recently got a ticket on an itinerary that went something like this:

SJC -> connecting airport on airline A
connecting airport -> destination on airline B

destination -> SFO on airline A

Much to my surprise, the ticket number had the airline code of airline B, not airline A. Can anyone explain to me why that happened? Does it matter?

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineM180up From El Salvador, joined May 2006, 403 posts, RR: 5
Reply 1, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4297 times:

The airline that is "control" of your ticket is the airline in whose stock number the ticket is, so in your case airline B.
The ticket plate or stock in which the ticket was issued will depend on who issued your ticket, if that was a travel agent might be that they didn't had any plates for airline A left, or that airline B charges less to issue tickets on their stock, as long as you're not making any change it shouldn't matter, in the case of a change into a reservation you will have to go to airline B to have it reissued, with the exception of flight irregularities on day of travel who are handled by the airline with the irregularity.
Hope that helps,
Regards

Werner



Werner from SAL
User currently offlineGuyBetsy1 From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 840 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 4189 times:

Usually it's the international flight / long haul section that determines on who's document the ticket is to be issued on. However, TAs have the ability to change that by overriding the auto ticketing facility when tickets are issued and to choose normally the first outbound flight.

User currently offline3201 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 4136 times:

OK thanks both! I'm guessing my TA didn't do anything to select it. Probably the system automatically selects the carrier based on the outbound (ignoring the return) and did in fact consider the outbound to be "airline B" since it was indeed the longer/international. I'll keep an eye on it in the future and request them to override it manually if I care.

User currently offlineBigOrange From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2364 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3983 times:

Quoting 3201 (Thread starter):
Much to my surprise, the ticket number had the airline code of airline B, not airline A. Can anyone explain to me why that happened?

In days of old, travel agents used to select the ticketing carrier based on who gave the highest commission, provided that airline had more mileage than the first.

Was airline B operating your first international segment on that ticket? Not sure if that rule still applies as I do very little international ticketing now, but it used to be that the airline with the first international segment was the "plating carrier"


User currently offlineA330300 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 172 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3968 times:

Usually if booked on Expedia or Travelocity, the first airline you travel on will "own" the ticket.

User currently offlineAirScoot From United States of America, joined May 2005, 688 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3890 times:

Technically if there's an international or "over the water" carrier (this could also be understood to be "trans continental depending on where you are in the world) that should be the one who the ticket is issued.. or plated.. on.

There could be a number of reasons for cross plating..

1) The travel agency has a contract with whoever they are plating on allowing for a better discount and/or more commission. An example of this would be where a contact exists between the agency and United Airlines where there is a discount that includes Lufthansa. In order to take care advantage of the discount United has to be paid, so the ticket is issued on United stock. (note.. since e-tickets have become so prevalent the word "stock" here is used loosely).

2) The travel agency has had their ticketing privileges revoked with one carrier so the plates of another are used to issue the ticket. (while rare, this practice is frowned upon and usually involves fraud).

3) The carrier in question has no representation in the settlement area where the ticket is issued. For example.. IR has no representation in the US. AF, on the other hand, does. In order to issue a ticket on IR within the US, it's allowed that AF's plates are used since they have an agreement.

4) There's international travel involved. The way things are SUPPOSED to work (mind you, that's a big SUPPOSED.. especially with a couple of carriers) is that whoever the ticket is plated on is the carrier who was paid. By default they're responsible for your transportation. In the event of an international ticket the international carrier would traditionally be used as the plating carrier so that they would reaccomodate you should your inbound connection on another carrier have trouble.

5) Carrier agreement. KL no longer has payment representation in the US - it's all handled by NW. KL's ticketing symbol is 074. In the US any KL record would be issued on NW stock (012) in lieu of being issued on KL. The reverse is true for Europe.

6) It was a typo 

7) It was the first carrier on the itinerary.

[Edited 2006-10-18 20:45:37]

User currently offline3201 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3753 times:

Quoting BigOrange (Reply 4):

Was airline B operating your first international segment on that ticket? Not sure if that rule still applies as I do very little international ticketing now, but it used to be that the airline with the first international segment was the "plating carrier"

That was the case here -- see below.

Quoting AirScoot (Reply 6):
There could be a number of reasons for cross plating..

Cool, thanks for that list, pretty interesting. Most of those definitely didn't apply in this case, but I did start with a domestic-to-international connection (some US city to LAX, then on to some non-US city), so the only miscon situation would require reaccomodation on airline B. So #4 kinda applies.


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