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Boeing 727- A Tribute By Wings  
User currently offlineWINGS From Portugal, joined May 2005, 2831 posts, RR: 68
Posted (8 years 2 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 21922 times:

Boeing 727 A Tribute By Wings

Hi folks, I was asked to edit my post by the moderators, as some of the photos used in the accident part of my thread was linked to Jetphotos. I have now edited the post and I will repost it so that all members can enjoy.

Well after receiving such positive feedback in regards to my previous Tributes to the Tupolev Tu-144 http://www.airliners.net/discussions...general_aviation/read.main/3033740 and the Lockheed L1011 http://www.airliners.net/discussions...general_aviation/read.main/3035490 I have now dedicated my third tribute to what I have to consider to be the best looking airplane that Boeing has produced until this present day. So let's all take a brief look back into the history of this magnificent and only three engined jet produced by Boeing.

http://rbogash.com/UAL727RO_40.jpg

The 727 design arose as a compromise between United Airlines, American Airlines, and Eastern Air Lines over the configuration of a jet airliner to service smaller cities which often had shorter runways and correspondingly smaller passenger demand. On December 5, 1960 Boeing announced the production of its 727, the first commercial three engined jet. United and Eastern Airlines would be the first airlines to commit to the 727 program by placing orders for 40 frames each.

http://rbogash.com/e1ro-2.JPG

The 727 proved very successful with airlines worldwide partly because of its capability to take off and land on smaller runways while still flying medium range routes. This effectively allowed airlines to attract passengers from cities with large populations but smaller airports to worldwide tourist destinations. One of the features that gave the 727 its ability to land on shorter runways was its unique wing design. Through flap extension and leading edge slat deployment, the 727 could almost double its wing surface area, allowing it to fly with great stability at very slow speeds. The 727 was designed to be used at smaller, regional airports, so independence from ground facilities was an important requirement. This gave rise one of the 727's most distinctive features: the built-in airstair that drops from the rear underbelly of the fuselage.



Even though the jet age essentially began in 1952 with the introduction of the British-designed de DeHavilland Comet. Several jetliners, including the Boeing 707, were developed before the 727, but none came close to its sales record. Boeing original forecast for the 727 was for 250 frames, but the 727 would become the best-selling airliner in history when orders passed the 1,000 mark, but as it turned out this figure would come to rest at a total of 1,831 deliveries, with only the B737 and latter on the A320 breaking this record. Its unprecedented low-speed landing and takeoff performance along with its luxuriously wide fuselage would make the 727 by far the most popular aircraft in the world through the first 35 years of jet
transportation.

http://rbogash.com/e1body.JPG
http://rbogash.com/727cab.JPG

On February 9, 1963 the first 727 took to the skies. With the following flight crew:
Capt. Lew Wallick; Co-Pilot Dix Loesch; Flight Engineer M.K. Shulenberger



http://rbogash.com/727to2.JPG
In late 1963, the first of a fleet of 76 Boeing 727 three-engine fan jets was delivered to Eastern. Regular schedules were flown with a 727, named the Whisperjet, on February 1, 1964 Eastern made the first revenue flight with the 727. In December 1966, Eastern began adding 25 Boeing 727-QC "Quick Change" jets, an airliner that can be converted from a passenger carrier to all-cargo in a matter of minutes. The planes carry passengers during the day and cargo at night.

http://www.airchive.com/Memorabilia/Eastern/*EAL%20B727-100.jpg

Introduced into service by United Airlines in February 1964, the airline would operate the first 727 built, until January 13 1991, when it made it's last commercial flight and was donated to the Museum of Flight in Seattle.



The 727, like all Boeing jetliners, was continually modified to fit the changing market. It began with the -100 series, of which 407 were sold. This was followed by the -100C convertible that featured a main-deck side cargo door, allowing it to carry either cargo pallets or passengers -- or a combination of both -- on the main deck. Boeing built 164 of these.
The 727-200, introduced in December 1967, had increased gross weight and a 20-foot longer fuselage that could accommodate as many as 189 passengers in an all-tourist configuration. In all its variations, 1,245 of the -200s were sold.
http://www.airchive.com/airline%20pics/Post%20Cards%20Compressed/AA727.jpg

727 Specifications
Wingspan: 108 feet (32.91 m)
Length: 153 feet 2 inches (46.69 m)
Tail Height: 34 feet (10.36 m)
Gross Maximum Taxi Weight: Standard: 191,000 pounds (86,600 kg)
Optional: 210,000 pounds (95,300 kg)
Power: Three Pratt & Whitney JT8D turbofans:
-15 rated at 15,500 pounds thrust
-17 rated at 16,000 pounds thrust
-17R rated at 17,400 pounds thrust
Cruising Speed: 570 to 605 mph (890 to 965 km/h)
Cruising Altitude: 30,000 to 40,000 feet (9,144 to 12,192 m)
Range: 1,500 to 2,500 miles (2,750 to 4,020 km)
Passenger Capacity: 148 to 189
Fuel: 8,186 U.S. gallons (31,000 L) standard at lower gross weights
9,806 U.S. gallons (37,020 L) standard for 208,000 pounds

BOEING 727 VARIANTS727-100
The first production model.
727-100C
Is the Convertible version. The seats can be removed and cargo placed on the main deck.
727-100QC
QC stands for Quick Change. This is similar to the Convertible version, however design changes allowed much faster transformation time.
727-100QF
QF stands for Quiet Freighter. United Parcel Service cargo conversion, re-engined with Stage III-compliant Rolls-Royce Tay turbofans.
[edit]
727-200
Stretched version of the 727.
Advanced 727-200
Stretched 20 feet ahead of the wings. MTOW and range increased.
Advanced 727-200F
All freight version of the 727-200.



727 DELIVERIES

1963- 6
1964-95
1965-111
1966-135
1967-155
1968-160
1969-114
1970-55
1971-33
1972-41
1973-92
1974-91
1975-91
1976-61
1977-67
1978-118
1979-136
1980-131
1981-94
1982-26
1983-11
1984-8

TOTAL: 1831+ 1 (Boeing Test Aircraft.)

727 ACCIDENTS
http://www.airdisaster.com/cgi-bin/view_manu_details.cgi?aircraft=727

08.16.1965 United Airlines Boeing 727-22 30/30
The aircraft crashed into Lake Michigan while approaching Chicago. Cause Unknown.
11.08.1965 American Airlines Boeing 727-23 58/62
The aircraft was on a visual approach for runway 18 at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in rain and clouds when the crew lost sight of the runway. While attempting to tune in the ILS frequency and become stabilized on the approach, the aircraft descended below glideslope and impacted the southern bank of the Ohio River, four miles short of the runway.
11.11.1965 United Airlines Boeing 727-22 43/91
The aircraft impacted approach lights short of the runway while attempting to land in adverse weather conditions.
02.04.1966 All Nippon Airways Boeing 727-81 133/133
The aircraft crashed into Tokyo Bay some seven miles from Tokyo's Haneda International Airport in clear weather conditions while on approach. Cause undetermined.
07.19.1967 Piedmont Airlines Boeing 727-22 82/82
The aircraft crashed after colliding with a private Cessna 310 approximately 8 nautical miles north-east of the Ashville, North Carolina, Airport. The Cessna had deviated from its IFR clearance. 79 killed aboard the 727, 3 aboard the Cessna.
02.16.1968 Civil Air Transport Boeing 727-92C 21/63+1
The aircraft crashed short of the runway at night. Investigation revealed that the pilots were not qualified to fly the aircraft.
01.05.1969 Ariana Afghan Airlines Boeing 727-113C 50/65+2
The aircraft crashed while attempting to land in low visibility conditions. The flaps were not extended far enough to maintain flight at final approach speed.
01.18.1969 United Airlines Boeing 727-22C 28/28
The aircraft crashed into Santa Monica Bay shortly after takeoff at night in poor weather. The no.3 electrical generator was listed as inoperative before the flight commenced. Shortly after takeoff, the flight crew received an engine fire warning on the no.1 engine, which was shut down. The no.2 electrical generator - the only one left functioning - was unable to handle the excess load due to the failure of the aircraft's other two generators, and shut down, leading to a loss of all electrical power aboard the aircraft. The crew almost immediately became disoriented and lost control of the aircraft.
06.04.1969 Mexicana Airlines Boeing 727-64 79/79
The aircraft crashed on approach after overflying their clearance limit by several miles in poor weather.
09.21.1969 Mexicana Airlines Boeing 727-64 27/118
The aircraft crashed approximately one mile short of the runway while attempting to land.
12.28.1970 Trans Caribbean Airways Boeing 727-2A7 2/55
During landing, the aircraft touched down hard, bounced to an altitude of 75 feet, and then stalled onto the runway, collapsing the landing gear. The aircraft overran the runway and impacted an embankment.
07.30.1971 All Nippon Airways Boeing 727-281 163/164
The aircraft crashed after colliding with a Japan Air Force F86 fighter jet in flight. The pilot of the F86 ejected, was tried for homicide, and found not guilty.
09.04.1971 Alaska Airlines Boeing 727-192 111/111
The aircraft crashed into terrain while executing a non-precision NDB approach to land in Juneau. Premature start of final descent by the Captain.
02.21.1973 Libya Arab Airlines Boeing 727-224 110/113
The aircraft crashed after being hit by a surface to air missile fired by an Israeli fighter jet. The Boeing had strayed off course and violated Israel's airspace, prompting the attack.
09.15.1974 Air Vietnam Boeing 727-121C 75/75
The aircraft crashed after several grenades were detonated by hijackers when the pilot refused to meet their demands.
12.01.1974 Northwest Orient Boeing 727-251 3/3
The aircraft's pitot tubes (which measure ram air and thus provide an air speed indication) were iced over after the crew failed to activate the anti-ice system in freezing rain conditions. This led to erroneous airspeed indications, a stall, and a spin from which the crew was unable to recover. Pilot error.
12.01.1974 Trans World Airlines Boeing 727-231 92/92
The aircraft crashed on approach to runway 30 at Washington D.C.'s Dulles International Airport. Flying a non-precision VOR approach in heavy winds and rain, the crew misidentified the final approach fix and began to descend prematurely, impacting terrain approximately 14 miles from the runway.
06.24.1975 Eastern Air Lines Boeing 727-225 115/124
The aircraft, on a flight from New Orleans to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport, struck approach lights during a runway 22L ILS approach. The aircraft broke up and caught fire.
04.05.1976 Alaska Airlines Boeing 727-81 1/57
The aircraft overran the runway while landing after the Captain attempted to go around at the last moment. Crew error.
04.27.1976 American Airlines Boeing 727-095 37/88
The Captain initiated a go around after touching down 1/3 down the runway. When no acceleration forces were felt, the throttles were once again retarded and an attempt was made to stop. The aircraft overran the runway with a nose-up attitude of 9° and at a speed of 132 knots.
09.20.1976 Turkish Airlines Boeing 727-2F2 154/154
The aircraft crashed into high terrain while on approach to Antalya, Turkey. The crew was using charts for the incorrect airport.
11.19.1977 TAP Portugal Boeing 727-282 131/164
The aircraft landed long and was unable to stop before running off a cliff at the departure end of the runway. Crew error - excessive speed during landing.
05.08.1978 National Airlines Boeing 727-235 3/58
The aircraft crashed into Pensacola Bay, 3 miles short of the runway, while executing a non-precision approach to land at the Pensacola Regl. Airport. Pilot error in failing to maintain MDA (minimum descent altitude) until the runway environment was in sight.
09.25.1978 Pacific Southwest Airlines Boeing 727-214 137/137 + 7
The aircraft crashed into the residential area of North Park after colliding with a Cessna 172 (Gibbs Flight Service) while making a visual approach to runway 27. ATC failure.
03.14.1979 Alia Royal Jordanian Airlines Boeing 727-2D3 45/64
The aircraft crashed during landing. Windshear.
01.21.1980 Iran National Airlines Boeing 727-86 128/128
The aircraft crashed while attempting to land in a snowstorm. Failure of the ILS equipment at a critical point during the approach.
04.12.1980 Transbrasil Boeing 727-27C 55/58
The aircraft crashed while attempting to land in a thunderstorm. Windshear.
04.25.1980 Danair Boeing 727-64 146/146
The aircraft crashed while in a holding pattern. The pilow overflew the clearance limits of the hold which put the aircraft into an area of high terrain.
06.08.1982 VASP Boeing 727-212A 137/137
The aircraft crashed while on a nighttime visual approach to land at Fortaleza. With the runway in sight to his right, the Captain continued the approach despite warnings from the First Officer of terrain ahead.
07.09.1982 Pan American World Airways Boeing 727-235 145/145 + 8
The aircraft crashed on takeoff from runway 10 at New Orleans International Airport. Rising to a height of approximately 100 feet, the aircraft encountered severe windshear and descended into a residential area.
01.16.1983 Turkish Airlines Boeing 727-2F2 47/67
The aircraft crashed short of the runway while attempting to land in snow and freezing fog.
12.07.1983 Iberia Boeing 727-256 51/93
While on its departure roll, the aircraft collided with an Aviaco DC-9 that had accidently entered the runway. Poor signage and a lack of ground radar contributed to the accident.
01.01.1985 Eastern Air Lines Boeing 727-225 29/29
The aircraft crashed into terrain at FL200. Crew error in not adhering to prescribed flight track. CFIT.
02.19.1985 Iberia Boeing 727-256 148/148
The aircraft impacted a television antenna and crashed into terrain while on approach to runway 30 at Bilbao, Spain. The left wing separated, and the aircraft crashed at about 3400ft. As the aircraft approached the rapidly rising terrain, the Captain was heard to yell 'shut up!' at the Ground Proximity Warning System several times as it sounded terrain alerts.
03.31.1986 Mexicana Airlines Boeing 727-264 167/167
The aircraft was climbing through FL290 for FL330 when a faulty tire exploded in the right main wheel well. Parts of the tire damaged the the aircraft's hydraulic system causing a loss of control.
04.02.1986 Trans World Airlines Boeing 727-231 4/121
Four passengers were ejected from the aircraft after a bomb exploded, tearing a hole in the fuselage and causing a rapid decompression.
02.27.1988 Talia Airways Boeing 727-2H9A 15/15
The aircraft crashed into terrain on approach. The pilot descended below the minimum safe altitude in an attempt to conduct a visual approach despite low ceilings. Crew error.
03.17.1988 Avianca Boeing 727-21 143/143
The aircraft impacted terrain shortly after takeoff. Non-crewmember in the cockpit who distracted the flight crew considerably from their duties.
08.31.1988 Delta Air Lines Boeing 727-232 14/108
The aircraft crashed while attempting to depart runway 18L at DFW. Failure of the crew to ensure that the flaps/slats were properly configured for takeoff. Contributing was the failure of the takeoff warning horn.
10.21.1989 TAN Boeing 727-224 127/146
The aircraft crashed short of the runway while attempting to land in heavy rain and high winds. Crew error.
09.11.1990 Faucett Boeing 727-247 18/18
The aircraft was forced to ditch into the North Atlantic after running out of fuel. Crew error, improper fuel planning.
12.22.1992 Libyan Arab Airlines Boeing 727-2L5 157/157
The aircraft collided with a Lybian MiG23 fighter jet while attempting to land. Failure of both pilots to practice 'see and avoid' procedures of VFR flight.
05.19.1993 SAM Colombia Boeing 727-46 132/132
The aircraft impacted terrain while approaching Cordova Airport. Improper vectors from Air Traffic Control put the aircraft into an area of high terrain.
11.07.1996 Aviation Development Corporation Boeing 727-231 143/143
The ADC aircraft was flying at FL240 en route from Port Harcourt to Lagos. At the same time a Triax aircraft had departed Lagos and was flying at FL160 towards Enugu. The Lagos controller had terminated contact with the Triax aircraft when the ADC crew requested to descend. The permission to descend was delayed to allow an ELF Petroleum business jet to pass beneath the 727 at FL210. When the controller finally cleared the ADC flight to descend, he thought he had cleared to aircraft to FL100 at an earlier stage, but the aircraft was still flying at FL240. When the ADC aircraft descended through FL160, the TCAS alarm sounded. To avoid a head-on collision the flightcrew immediately took evasive action. During this maneuver, the Boeing rolled to an excessive bank angle and conrol was lost. Within 16 seconds speed had increased from 280kts to almost the speed of sound. The aircraft crashed and disintegrated on impact.
02.09.1998 American Airlines Boeing 727-223 0/121
The aircraft crashed while attempting to land on runway 14R at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. Touching down 200 feet prior to the threshold into the approach lights, the landing gear was sheared off.
03.19.1998 Ariana Afghan Airlines Boeing 727-228 45/45
The aircraft crashed while on approach. Controlled flight into terrain. The crew descended below the minimum safe altitude for the area in which they were operating.
04.20.1998 Transportes Aéreos Militares Ecuatorianos Boeing 727-230 53/53
The aircraft crashed into terrain shortly after takeoff from El Dorado International Airport. Failure of the flight crew to execute a right turn shortly after takeoff, as prescribed in the departure publications, even after being warned by Air Traffic Control that they had failed to make the required turn. The aircraft was operating for Air France.
10.10.1998 Congo Airlines Boeing 727-030 41/41
The aircraft crashed after being shot down by rebels. Second accident in two weeks involving an aircraft being shot down by a surface to air missile.
07.07.1999 Lufthansa Cargo Airlines Boeing 727-243 5/5
Lufthansa Flight 8533 departed Kathmandu at 19.46h for a flight to New Delhi. Some five minutes after takeoff the aircraft crashed in flames in the Champadevi hills at the 7550ft level, were it should have been at an altitude of 9500ft. Kathmandu Airport is located at 6250ft. Initial reports identified the captain as Gonjalez, flight officer as Shahni, flight engineer as Vargava and the two others as Singh and Roy. The plane was carrying about 21 tons of cargo, mostly woolen carpet, when it crashed. Weather at the time was drizzly conditions with ground temperature of 22 C. PROBABLE CAUSE: Failure to the adhere to Standard Instrument Departure Procedure (SID) by the crew and failure of the controllers to warn the flight. Contributing factors were incomplete departure briefing, the unexpected airspeed decay during the initial right climbing turn, inadequate intra cockpit crew coordination and communication, and the slow response to the premonition given by air traffic controller.
01.05.2001 Air Gemini Cargo Boeing 727-46F 0/10 + 1
The aircraft developed engine problems on takeoff and crashed during an emergency landing attempt, killing a man who had stopped to relieve himself close to runway. The aircraft was written off as a result of the accident.
01.28.2002 Transportes Aéreos Militares Ecuatorianos Boeing 727-134 92/92
TAME flight 120 departed Quito at 10:03am on the first leg of its scheduled Quito-Tulcán-Cali (Colombia) flight. Radio contact with the aircraft was lost at 10:23am as it approached Tulcán. The aircraft crashed near the Colombian city of Ipiales, approximately 20 miles north of Tulcán, in a crater near the top of the 15,626ft Cumbal Volcano. The wreckage of the aircraft was found by aerial search some 24 hours after the initial disappearance of the plane. The weather in the heavily mountainous region was reported to be foggy around the time of the accident.
07.26.2002 Federal Express Boeing 727-232AF 0:3
The aircraft crashed at 5:43am local time while attempting to land at Tallahassee Regional Airport on a cargo flight from Memphis, TN. With the Tallahassee Airport control tower closed due to the early-morning hour, the flight crew received clearance from Jacksonville Center for a visual approach to runway 9 at 5:36am. The first impact mark was on a tree, about 70 feet high and 3,100 feet from the end of the runway. The plane first hit the ground about 2,100 feet from the end of the runway, and the first piece of wreckage - a leading edge flap - was found approximately 200 feet from the initial tree-strike point. The aircraft's landing gear was down at the time of the accident. The 727 skidded to a stop about 1,000 feet from the end of the runway and caught fire. The flight crew escaped major injury.
12.25.2003 Union des Transports Aériens de Guinée Boeing 727-223 151/163
The aircraft, on a chartered passenger flight from Cotonou to Beirut, crashed while attempting to takeoff on runway 24 at approximately 1415 GMT. Witnesses reported that the aircraft impacted a building, exploded, and crashed into the sea. Weather at the time of the accident was good, with airport officials reporting light winds and clear conditions. Various media outlets report that the plane may have been overloaded.

INTERESTING FACTS
*One hundred and one customers purchased new 727s from Boeing
*The 727 is equipped with a retractable tail skid which is designed to protect the aircraft in the event of an over-rotation on takeoff.

*Despite the exterior noise, the 727 has a relatively quiet passenger cabin due to the placement of the engines at the rear of the aircraft.

*In the early 1960s, Eastern Air Lines and other airlines began calling their 727s "Whisperjets", allegedly because a passenger seated forward in First Class, in theory, could only hear the rear-mounted turbofan jet engines as a whisper in the background. This feature also permitted passengers to whisper to each other. Before Boeing built 727s, hearing someone whispering aboard a jet plane was not possible.
*Post-production winglets have also been installed on many 727's as a means of noise reduction as part of so called "Quiet Wing" Kits and for added fuel economy.

*Every few years, 727 cargo planes accidentally tip back and wind up sitting on their tails because the planes are unloaded improperly and the Airstair in the tail is not deployed. All three turbofan jet engines are all mounted at the tail of the plane making the aircraft rear end heavy.

*For many years, the 727-200 had the most heavily loaded tires of any production aircraft, with a maximum rated load of 45,240 lb (20,520 kg) per main landing gear tire when the aircraft is fully loaded. The maximum tire load of the 727 was only recently exceeded by heavier variants of the Boeing 777.

*Sept. 18, 1984 Last 727 delivered (a 727-200F to Federal Express) after 22 years of production; 1,832 total built.

April 6, 1983 Last 727 passenger airplane delivered to USAir.

*On Dec. 5, 1977, the worldwide 727 fleet carried its one billionth (1,000,000,000) passenger -- a mark never attained before by a commercial aircraft. Today, the number has reached well over 4 billion.
]

SOURCES:
http://www.boeing.com/commercial/727family/index.html
http://rbogash.com/727history.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_727
http://www.airdisaster.com/cgi-bin/view_manu_details.cgi?aircraft=727
http://www.airchive.com/SITE%20PAGES/PLANE-VIN%20POSTCARDS.html
http://www.evair.com/ealhistory.htm

Regards,
Wings


Aviation Is A Passion.
28 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLordg From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2006, 31 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 2 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 21904 times:

interesting fact about the rear stair/door, don,t know the date but an armed man 'mugged' all the passengers on board money & jewelerry etc and then jumped out the hatch with a parachute, after which all american 727s were converted to normal door planes.


If you're going through hell- keep going!
User currently offlineWINGS From Portugal, joined May 2005, 2831 posts, RR: 68
Reply 2, posted (8 years 2 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 21890 times:

Quoting Lordg (Reply 1):
interesting fact about the rear stair/door, don,t know the date but an armed man 'mugged' all the passengers on board money & jewelerry etc and then jumped out the hatch with a parachute, after which all american 727s were converted to normal door planes.



D.B. Cooper, Outlaw / Missing Person

* Born: ?
* Birthplace: ?
* Died: Vanished 24 November 1971 (fate unknown)
* Best Known As: The parachuting skyjacker who maybe got away

The original jumping skyjacker, Cooper boarded a Northwest Orient flight in Portland, Oregon on 24 November 1971 -- the eve of Thanksgiving. Once aloft he threatened to blow up the plane and demanded $200,000 and four parachutes. After the plane landed at Seattle-Tacoma Airport and his demands were met, Cooper ordered the 727 to take off and head for Mexico. He jumped from the rear of the plane somewhere over Washington state, taking the cash with him. Despite exhaustive searches, Cooper's body was never found and his whereabouts are unknown.

http://www.answers.com/topic/d-b-cooper

Regards,
Wings



Aviation Is A Passion.
User currently offlineDakota123 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 116 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 2 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 21816 times:

Quoting Lordg (Reply 1):
interesting fact about the rear stair/door, don,t know the date but an armed man 'mugged' all the passengers on board money & jewelerry etc and then jumped out the hatch with a parachute, after which all american 727s were converted to normal door planes.

On the planes I am familiar with, an aerodynamically activated lock of sorts was retroactively fitted to the door. It would pivot over one edge of the door once the plane was moving and prevent its being opened in flight.

Dakota123


User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (8 years 2 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 21784 times:

Interesting to see the accident list in one place like that. This plane was really the working ground where the NTSB and FAA learned a ton about crew procedures, CFIT, and tons of other human factors that cause crashes. If I am not mistaken, at one point when the crashes started piling up early, the NTSB came out and said essentially that the aircraft was almost too pilot friendly. The pilots loved it, and felt like they could fly it by the seats of their pants when the conditions really called for a more conservative approach. A lot of training changed because of early incidents on the 727. Not a specific fault of the aircraft...just the realities of human nature I guess.


There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlineBreiz From France, joined Mar 2005, 1920 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (8 years 2 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 21610 times:

Quoting WINGS (Thread starter):
Before Boeing built 727s, hearing someone whispering aboard a jet plane was not possible.

WINGS, I can assure you that whispering on board a SE-210 Caravelle was possible some years before the B727. But of course I am older than you to remember that.


User currently offlineBaron95 From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1335 posts, RR: 8
Reply 6, posted (8 years 2 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 21474 times:

I have a question - what would make an airline choose the 727 vs the 737 when both were available? Particularly after the advent of the 737-300.

I mean, come-on, 3 engines, 3-crew, more expensive. What gives? Range - not that much better than 737. Capacity? Again not much bigger? What then?



Killer Fleet: E190, 737-900ER, 777-300ER
User currently offlineBrenintw From Taiwan, joined Jul 2006, 1720 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (8 years 2 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 21462 times:

Quoting Baron95 (Reply 6):
I have a question - what would make an airline choose the 727 vs the 737

The added reliability of a third engine is probably the major factor -- this (especially) allowed longer over-water legs. (Prior to ETOPS, a twin had to be within 60 minutes' flying time of a suitable airport at all times.)



I'm tired of the A vs. B sniping. Neither make planes that shed wings randomly!
User currently offlineMEA-707 From Netherlands, joined Nov 1999, 4358 posts, RR: 35
Reply 8, posted (8 years 2 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 21428 times:

Quoting Baron95 (Reply 6):
have a question - what would make an airline choose the 727 vs the 737 when both were available? Particularly after the advent of the 737-300.
I mean, come-on, 3 engines, 3-crew, more expensive. What gives? Range - not that much better than 737. Capacity? Again not much bigger? What then?

Well maybe that's why the 727 stopped being built after 1983 and before the 737-300 came, don't you think?
After 1983 of course the 727 would only be bought and sold on the 2nd hand martket. That some airlines, even now, still fly or buy 2nd hand 727s over the 737 is because of the low acquisition costs and the higher costs to replace them. Especially if you don't fly 12 hours a day with it (cargo airlines, smaller airlines), the acquisition or leasecosts can still outweigh the higher fuel and staff costs of a 727.



nobody has ever died from hard work, but why take the risk?
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31702 posts, RR: 56
Reply 9, posted (8 years 2 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 21373 times:

Fantastic Tribute.Awaiting your B737 Tribute  Smile
The best part of the B727 was the Aft Air Stair looked great & the cooper lock.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineNWOrientDC10 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1404 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (8 years 2 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 21167 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 9):
Fantastic Tribute

True

Here are some 727-200 a/c on which I have flown:

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Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Stefan Sjögren - Stockholm Arlanda Photography
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Photo © Konstantin von Wedelstaedt


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Photo © Andy Martin - AirTeamImages
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Photo © Bill Blanchard - AirTeamImages


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Photo © AirNikon



The best seat, IMHO, on this a/c type:

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Photo © Daniel Werner



I know WA (and UA, according to the above pic) have the rear galley on the starboard side of the a/c while most other 727-200's have the galley on the port side. What other airlines have the galley on the starboard side. Also, did all 727-100's have the rear galley on the same side?

This is a good discussion topic. Thank You, Wings, for having it.  Smile

BTW, what happened to the other replies? Were they deleted?

Good Day  Smile

Russell



Things aren't always as they seem
User currently offlineBaron95 From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1335 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (8 years 2 months 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 21101 times:

Quoting Brenintw (Reply 7):
The added reliability of a third engine is probably the major factor -- this (especially) allowed longer over-water legs. (Prior to ETOPS, a twin had to be within 60 minutes' flying time of a suitable airport at all times.)

I wasn't aware that many 727s were flying more than 60 min from shore. What routes were those? I knes Eastern flew them over the Caribean, but I'm sure those remained within 60 minutes of shore.

Quoting MEA-707 (Reply 8):
Well maybe that's why the 727 stopped being built after 1983 and before the 737-300 came, don't you think?

Actually, you are right - my fault for not checking, last deliveries of the 727 in 1984 coincided with the first deliveries of the 733. Then let me ask this, what were the major advantages of the 727 vs 737-200, they were both produced side-by-side for some 15 years.



Killer Fleet: E190, 737-900ER, 777-300ER
User currently offlineImperialEagle From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2630 posts, RR: 22
Reply 12, posted (8 years 2 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 21032 times:

Sorry, previous attempt to post did not materialize! Will try it again.


Here at ATL, in late '63 EA had an "open house" at their hanger to show off the new 727. I remember it well. It was in the hanger along with an L188 and a DC-7B. It certainly did make the piston and propeller turbine powered aircraft look dated!
It was magical with the shiney new "Golden Falcon" livery and with that towering "T" tail and three engines on the rear----it was totally futurama! Wow!

In the early days when fuel was cheap it was fun to see the EA 72's leap off of the runway. You could tell the crew was really enjoying them.
Of course, like the other jets of the era, they poured black smoke. It didn't take long before those pretty "Golden Falcons" on the vertical fin looked a bit bar-b-qued from all the black soot deposited by reverse thrust applications.
Some of the aircraft of that era got really bad. I can remember PI's 72's (and the aft-of-wing fuselage of their early 73's) turning absoloutely black from all the cycles.
Hoooooray for better burner cans!

I can remember becoming angry at the 72's for displacing my favorite "windmills"----especially the L188's. And once the DC-9-30's (DL and EA) started to pour into ATL en mass, it was all over. The late '70's ATL push looked like a sales film for 72's and D93's. It almost got boring as one watched all those tri-motors (and diesel twins) line up for take off.

It got to where I just plain took them for granted.

Like most people in the US, I flew on many a 72. Some of the flights were VERY memorable.
Worst turbulence I ever encountered: MCO-MIA on a NA 721 through a thunderstorm one summers afternoon.
It was WILD man!
Koolest take-off: on a 722 of NW from MDW to DTW aircraft nearly empty we pulled so many 'gs as the wheels left the pavement most of us guys did a "yeee-haaaw" on the way up! Awesome! That bird thought she was a 720B!

EA's "Whisperjet" campaign was really effective in the mind of the public too (although they also referred to the D9's as "Whisperjets"). It was always amazing to me that most folks could get off of a plane from any carrier and most of the time if you asked what type aircraft they had flown on, the answer was always "hmmmm some kind of Whisperjet". Of course I heard not a few country folks say the same thing about their flights on a 440 or 188.
But don't talk to those of us who sat aft of the rear doors on a 722 about whispers! ESPECIALLY if the door seals were worn and the engines were high-time!
Ruuuummmmm-ruuuuuummmmmm, ruuuuuummmmm! On a long flight it was grueling. Pray for some cotton balls in your flight bag!

Well here at ATL the 72's are mostly gone now--a few cargo versions 100's and 200's here and there. I find I actually take the time to stop and watch them whenever I see one arrive or depart-------who would have thunk it?

The Boeing 727's were great thoroughbreds and I'm glad for the experiences I had with them!

Thanks WINGS for the tribute!



"If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough!"
User currently offlineRICARIZA From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 2393 posts, RR: 26
Reply 13, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 20835 times:

Quoting WINGS (Thread starter):
to what I have to consider to be the best looking airplane that Boeing has produced until this present day

I have to agree with that..
It was great as usual.. thank you WINGS!!




I miss ACES, I am proud of AVIANCA & I am loyal to AMERICAN
User currently offline727Tiger From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 274 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 20825 times:

My first ride (Braniff MKC-DAL) and my all-time favorite (as if you couldn't tell from my Username). Later, I flew them on more Braniff I flights, DL, TW, EA and Piedmont.

Another great tribute, Wings.

[Edited 2006-10-26 21:32:27]

User currently offlineLeezyjet From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 4042 posts, RR: 53
Reply 15, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 20726 times:

Quoting WINGS (Thread starter):
The aircraft crashed after being hit by a surface to air missile fired by an Israeli fighter jet.

I'm sure a missile fired by a fighter jet is an AIR to air missile !!!.

 Smile



"She Rolls, 45 knots, 90, 135, nose comes up to 20 degrees, she's airborne - She flies, Concorde Flies"
User currently offlineWINGS From Portugal, joined May 2005, 2831 posts, RR: 68
Reply 16, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 20633 times:

My first and only trip aboard a B727-200ADV was with Tap Portugal in 1988. Even though I was young at the time I remember like it was yesterday.



When the last B727 is retired she will be dearly missed.

Regards,
Wings



Aviation Is A Passion.
User currently offlineTrintocan From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2000, 3257 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 20479 times:

A great tribute Wings. I have flown on 727s several times. In the Caribbean the 727 is quite iconic because BWIA used them as their famous Sunjets. They received 3 in 1965-6 and used them until 1971 when they traded them to Braniff for 707s. Air Jamaica also flew 727s - first on joint BW services and later on their own until the 1990s when A320s took over.

I never flew on 727s of either Caribbean airline but I have flown those of AA, UA and EA. My first 727 flight was on AA between LGA and YYZ in 1983 then the return 11 days later. That return journey I remember for the worst downdraft I have ever experienced. The plane entered a cloud about halfway along the journey and it shook a bit before suddenly dropping about 1000 feet (300m) - half the passengers aboard started screaming and I was terrified! Thankfully nothing more happened on that journey!

My next 727s came in 1986 with EA - I did POS-MIA (via ANU), ATL-RIC and MIA-POS (again via ANU). The flight from ATL was delayed by severe storms and was the only time I flew on a 727-100. 1989 saw me fly AA's 727s on sectors MIA-DFW, DFW-MEX, MEX-DFW and RDU-MIA. It was then the turn of UA in 1993 as I did IAD-MCO on one of their 200s and finally AA gave me a 727 trip in 1997 from MIA-DCA.

The 727's fortunes have been drastically affected by 11 September 2001 as the downturn in the airline markets saw many airlines retire them, particularly in the USA. Hopefully the few that still fly remain a long-lived testament to their durability and reliability. Over in the UK and Europe 727s are very rare sights indeed.

TrinToCan.



Hop to it, fly for life!
User currently offlineBoomBoom From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 20448 times:

Northern Air Cargo is still using the 727-100F

NAC's Boeing 727-100F jet aircraft carry up to 38,000 pounds. Although this aircraft is rarely used in passenger transport today, cargo applications are endless. Using our 727's to supplement our DC-6 fleet, we are able to serve the farthest outlying hub stations with state maintained, paved, runways over 5000 ft. The large cargo door allows us to carry oversize freight and palletized "loose loaded" freight on our scheduled service, in addition to many charter applications throughout Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, Russia, and the rest of the Pacific Rim.
http://www.nacargo.com/about/fleet.php


User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 20429 times:

Quoting Lordg (Reply 1):
interesting fact about the rear stair/door, don,t know the date but an armed man 'mugged' all the passengers on board money & jewelerry etc and then jumped out the hatch with a parachute, after which all american 727s were converted to normal door planes.

The 727's all remained the same, however, Boeing designed the infamous "Cooper Vane" a device that aerodynamically locks the ventral airstairs while in flight. Older 727 were retrofitted with these devices, and the following 727's had these installed while in production.

Quoting WINGS (Reply 2):
Despite exhaustive searches, Cooper's body was never found and his whereabouts are unknown.

(Somebody could better explain this than me), It should be interesting to note, that ~10 years later, a huge amount of cash was found floating in a river in a forest, somewhat near the area where investigators had determined D.B. Cooper could have jumped out.


User currently offline727LOVER From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 6609 posts, RR: 20
Reply 20, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 20378 times:

Quoting WINGS (Thread starter):
In all its variations, 1,245 of the -200s were sold.

I believe there were 1260 727-200s built. Perhaps you are missing those Fed Ex aircraft.

And in the crash section, I think there is a Pan Am aircraft loss in East Germany missing. I even did a thread about it:

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/general_aviation/read.main/813389

But all in all a great tribute.  cool 



Listen Betty, don't start up with your 'White Zone' s*** again.
User currently offlineAlitalia744 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 4763 posts, RR: 44
Reply 21, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 20374 times:

Wings - we usually don't see eye to eye, but a great tribute you put together for the most beautiful airliner ever to grace the skies - the 727!

Thanks!



Some see lines, others see between the lines.
User currently offlineMilesrich From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2012 posts, RR: 6
Reply 22, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 20302 times:

The tribute is nice, but the info on the 11/11/65 SLC UA accident is totally inaccurate. There was no bad weather that day, just very bad piloting by one, Gale C. Kehmeyer, [sic], who really screwed the pooch. When I started traveling for business in 1973, the vast majority of flights were on 727's. My first 727 flight was on United in March of 1964 from DEN to ORD, my last in November of 2001 on Delta, ROC to ATL.

727's I have flown on:

727-100 UA, AA, WA Transworld Airlines (USA)">TW, NA, EA, DL, BN, PS, PA, NW, FL
727-200 UA, AA, WA Transworld Airlines (USA)">TW, NA, EA, DL, BN, PS, PA, NW, AL, RW, RC, PE, WA, PI, FL, US


User currently offlineOsiris30 From Barbados, joined Sep 2006, 3192 posts, RR: 25
Reply 23, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 20297 times:

By far the best looking sub-sonic jet liner ever built; period. End of Story.

It looks like it's going mach 3 sitting still. The 727 has got to be my favorite airliner of all time as far as looks go. Sure Concorde and the Tu-144 looked unique, but nothing EVER has done 'sexy' the same way (sorry that's the best way I can put it).



I don't care what you think of my opinion. It's my opinion, so have a nice day :)
User currently offlineLuvAir From Germany, joined Oct 2006, 22 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (8 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 20238 times:

Here's another website on D.B. Cooper's heist: http://www.super70s.com/Super70s/News/1971/November/24-DB_Cooper.asp

Quoting WINGS (Reply 2):
The original jumping skyjacker, Cooper boarded a Northwest Orient flight in Portland, Oregon on 24 November 1971 -- the eve of Thanksgiving. Once aloft he threatened to blow up the plane and demanded $200,000 and four parachutes. After the plane landed at Seattle-Tacoma Airport and his demands were met, Cooper ordered the 727 to take off and head for Mexico. He jumped from the rear of the plane somewhere over Washington state, taking the cash with him. Despite exhaustive searches, Cooper's body was never found and his whereabouts are unknown.


25 DxBrian : Ever use google? The 737-200 had 115-120 seats, where the 727-200 could hold 150-160 in 2 class config, and about 180 in an all coach configuration.
26 Post contains links and images DTW757 : I've flown on 19 different 727's over the years with Piedmont, United, American, TWA, and Northwest. I even had the opportunity to fly the -100 model
27 Post contains links WINGS : Well not according to Boeing. Production of the 727 extended from the early 1960s to August 1984 -- a remarkable length of time, considering the orig
28 Post contains images Arcano : Lovely post and great aircraft. Chile aviation had many 727s in its history... Regards to my first aircraft ever
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