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Boeing Begins Use Of 777 Moving Line Assembly  
User currently offlineNYC777 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 5774 posts, RR: 47
Posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 11965 times:

+ Completed first step of converting the line to a moving line.
+ Only final assembly if production process has been converted.
+ Entire production process to be converrted to moving line by 2008.

http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/061108/sfw095.html?.v=71

[Edited 2006-11-08 18:34:03]


That which does not kill me makes me stronger.
45 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLeelaw From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 11769 times:

Boeing Begins Use of Moving Assembly Line for 777 Jetliners

SEATTLE, Nov. 08, 2006 -- The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA] has started using a moving assembly line for the first time to build its market-leading 777 jetliner. For now, the moving assembly line is used only during final assembly positions for the airplane, moving it at a steady pace of 1.6 inches per minute during production...






To make its 777 assembly line move during final assembly, Boeing uses a tug that attaches around the front landing gear of the airplane and pulls it forward. The tug has an optical sensor that follows a white line along the floor.

http://www.boeing.com/news/releases/2006/q4/061107b_nr.html


User currently offlineNYC777 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 5774 posts, RR: 47
Reply 2, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 11738 times:

Is Boeing supposed to increase the production rates of the 777? If so from what rate to what rate?

Does the moving line help increase the production rate?



That which does not kill me makes me stronger.
User currently offlineLuisca From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 11722 times:

I'm guessing the Dreamliner's assembly will also be moving line from the beggining?

User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12589 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 11710 times:

Quoting NYC777 (Reply 2):
Is Boeing supposed to increase the production rates of the 777? If so from what rate to what rate?

From 1.6 inches per minute to 2.0?  biggrin 



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineNYC777 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 5774 posts, RR: 47
Reply 5, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 11677 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 4):
From 1.6 inches per minute to 2.0?

heh, heh. Good one!  biggrin   laughing 



That which does not kill me makes me stronger.
User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 11589 times:

Quoting NYC777 (Reply 5):
heh, heh. Good one!

It's not such a joke though really...increasing the speed of the moving line at that rate would increase montly production by 20%. That's not a small number folks, even if it's not going to beat any slugs in races.  Wink



There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlineNYC777 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 5774 posts, RR: 47
Reply 7, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 11551 times:

Ok but what is the monthly 777 out going to be eventually. Right now it seems to be about 5 to 6 per month but are they going to increase it something like 7 to 8 per month?

I think they would have to with the increasing 777 backlog.



That which does not kill me makes me stronger.
User currently offlineBeech19 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 936 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 11509 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 4):
From 1.6 inches per minute to 2.0?

Actually yes... 2in/min is the proposed speed for the moving lines when they were being talked about. I beleive that is the speed of the 737 lines. So they COULD speed it up 20% as was mentioned and increase production by A LOT.

There has been talk of speeding up the 777 line to faster than 5 days.

Quoting NYC777 (Reply 7):
I think they would have to with the increasing 777 backlog.

I think they should leave it at 5 days myself. It will keep a good backlog yet customer can still get aircraft within 18 months of ordering. Unless they got some massive order (or a few) they should probably leave it alone.



KPAE via KBVY
User currently offlineGr8Circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3107 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 11304 times:

A question here.....does Boeing (and Airbus too) have production work round the clock in shifts, or do the plants shut down at night...?

User currently offlineBeech19 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 936 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 11202 times:

Quoting Gr8Circle (Reply 9):
A question here.....does Boeing (and Airbus too) have production work round the clock in shifts, or do the plants shut down at night...?

I can't speak for Airbus but at Boeing its 24/7. Day shift, swing and graveyard (only 6 hours long).
They only shut down twice a year... Family Day (in August usually) and for the Christmas-New Years break (1 - 2 weeks).



KPAE via KBVY
User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31060 posts, RR: 87
Reply 11, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 11197 times:
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Quoting NYC777 (Reply 7):
Ok but what is the monthly 777 out going to be eventually. Right now it seems to be about 5 to 6 per month but are they going to increase it something like 7 to 8 per month?

The primary limit to the 777 production rate right now is the ability of suppliers to get parts to PAE, I believe.

Quoting Gr8Circle (Reply 9):
A question here.....does Boeing (and Airbus too) have production work round the clock in shifts, or do the plants shut down at night...?

Boeing works round-the-clock.


User currently offline787atPAE From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 143 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 11011 times:

Boeing may build the aircraft all day, but only the cool stuff happens at night. Stuff like moves of the fuselage sections, wings, etc, over other planes and through the factory. Even the doggone airplane itself goes to the paint shop at night. I've only heard riveting during the day.

User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31060 posts, RR: 87
Reply 13, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 11001 times:
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I did see one of EK's 773ER, in full colors, in front of the hanger one morning on the way into work a month or so ago. Fortunately, traffic was not too snarled.  Smile

User currently offlineLightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13156 posts, RR: 100
Reply 14, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 10958 times:
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Quoting Revelation (Reply 4):
From 1.6 inches per minute to 2.0?

 rotfl  As others noted, so true. The whole point of a moving line is to add a pace to the production. By doing so, workers get motivated to finish before passing a litteral "inchstone." Same number of workers, greater number of airframes. Boeing customers are happy (they get their 777's on time), stockholders are happy (more profit) and the workers should be happy (believe it or not, it improves job security).

Quoting Stitch (Reply 11):
The primary limit to the 777 production rate right now is the ability of suppliers to get parts to PAE, I believe.

They'll be able to ramp up. A 25% increase isn't major. (My math. 25% of 1.6 is 0.4. 0.4+1.6 is 2.0.  Wink

Hence my signature...  duck 
Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlineSlimChance From United States of America, joined May 2006, 62 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 10914 times:

Quoting Beech19 (Reply 8):
Unless they got some massive order

You mean like if some cargo operator suddenly put in an order for 15+15?  Wink


User currently offlineLokey123 From Barbados, joined May 2006, 138 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 10878 times:

I was down at BFI today and I'm heading up to Everett tomorrow. It should be interesting to get a look at this newly implemented moving assembly line. Will let all know what I see.

User currently offline777MechSys From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 350 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks ago) and read 10758 times:
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Quoting Stitch (Reply 11):
The primary limit to the 777 production rate right now is the ability of suppliers to get parts to PAE, I believe.

 checkmark 

Quoting Beech19 (Reply 8):
There has been talk of speeding up the 777 line to faster than 5 days.

I believe they under 5 right now. 4 to be technical. LOL  Wink I can't let you be right all the time.

Still talks of a 3 day rate.


User currently offlineToiletboy99999 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 10666 times:

Quoting NYC777 (Reply 2):
Does the moving line help increase the production rate?

This is actually very beneficial to Boeing. My degree is essentially doing things like this.

If anyone has ever seen those older photos of the boeing assembly process, it is a nightmare moving around all the planes to where they need to be. It was a real life game of Tetris. By having it set up this way, Boeing moves the plane down an organized chain, and moves the plane to each station.

Additionally, Boeing can better predict production times, and better fill in orders of new planes, because there is a more organized time slot system.

Yesterday, I spoke to a Boeing recruiter, and he told me that they are able to produce 28 737's a month using 2 moving assembly lines. I wont bore anyone with the details, but this concept has worked so well for Boeing, and has dramatically reduced production time of what it used to be.


User currently offlineBeech19 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 936 posts, RR: 4
Reply 19, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 10482 times:

Quoting 777MechSys (Reply 17):
I believe they under 5 right now. 4 to be technical. LOL I can't let you be right all the time.

Still talks of a 3 day rate.

Well... you COULD...
I thought they were at 5 and talking about going to three. My informant must have been wrong.  duck 



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User currently offlineTheweave33 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 41 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 10009 times:

Quoting Toiletboy99999 (Reply 18):
I wont bore anyone with the details

I'd love to hear the details. Is there anywhere on the web where one could find such descriptions?


User currently offlineVorticity From United States of America, joined May 2004, 337 posts, RR: 5
Reply 21, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 9802 times:

The moving assembly line is part of Boeing's "Lean" efforts. It's intended to eliminate waste, and improve quality. If you really want to know more about it (the details)... read this article..

http://www.boeing.com/news/frontiers/archive/2002/august/cover.html



Thermodynamics and english units don't mix...
User currently offlineCobra27 From Slovenia, joined May 2001, 1016 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 9514 times:

I think moving assembley line has only pyhcological advantages for workers, they get more into getting the job done. I see no other benefits from. The planes are to big to be put on conveyor line.

Does Airbus have a production line? I am not sure, but I think they don't have and at the same time have lower production cost for A320 family than Boeing 737


User currently offlineAstuteman From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 10074 posts, RR: 97
Reply 23, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 9452 times:
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Quoting Revelation (Reply 4):
From 1.6 inches per minute to 2.0?



Quoting NYC777 (Reply 5):
heh, heh. Good one!

It does sound funny, but it's true - you increase throughput by increasing the pace.
Simple eh?
NOT!  Smile
The pace will be governed by the slowest operation (bottleneck).
Increasing the line pace usually requires a re-engineering of the bottleneck process.
It may even require a re-engineering of the product around the bottleneck process.

(If you're ever bored, ask me what I learned about product re-engineering from watching the guys at Nissan, Sunderland, installing engines/transmissions in Bluebirds..  Smile )

The beauty, though, is a clear visibility as to the overall benefit to the product and the line  thumbsup   cloudnine 

Quoting Lightsaber (Reply 14):
. The whole point of a moving line is to add a pace to the production

 checkmark  - A "Cadence" even  Smile

Quoting Vorticity (Reply 21):
.

Thanks for the fascinating link, Vorticity

It's well worth a read, for all you guys out there  checkmark 

Quoting Cobra27 (Reply 22):
I think moving assembley line has only pyhcological advantages for workers

I have to strongly disagree with that, Cobra27.

The moving assembly line imposes a discipline to the production process whose effect is felt right down the supply chain and back into design.  yes 

Vorticity's link scratches the surface. I'd strongly suggest reading it (if you haven't already).
The moving assembly line will re-engineer just about the entire business focussed around that product.

It's also much more prone to being disrupted by problems/issues, but that's actually the point of it.
You HAVE to have disciplines that a non-moving line allow you to get away with.
Those disciplines are invariably beneficial to the business.

Great news for the 777 and Boeing  Smile

Regards


User currently offlineLeelaw From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 9007 times:

Boeing spurs 777 output
New system makes production toe the line

By JAMES WALLACE
P-I AEROSPACE REPORTER

...For now, a tug moves the 777 along a 275-foot line during final assembly. The tug, which has an optical sensor that follows a line on the floor, is attached to the front landing gear and pulls the plane forward about 1.6 inches per minute. The tug stops if there is a problem.

During this part of final assembly, mechanics install seats, overhead bins and other interior parts. In addition, functional testing is performed on various systems, and the two engines are installed.

Eventually, Boeing could be building the 777 at record rates. Boeing will not talk about the production rate for a specific jet, but the company is boosting production of the 777 to seven jets a month, according to people on the program. Boeing has studied the feasibility of raising rates even more, to perhaps 10 planes a month...


http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/291678_boeing09.html


25 Cobra27 : That is what I said. Other benefits? Something from engineer's (not psychology of workers) maybe? Or not?
26 Post contains images Astuteman : For fear we have a misunderstanding, I believed you to have said that the moving line has "only psychological advantages for workers". My words "disc
27 UAL747-600 : With regards to monthly/anual deliveries see below. Fair use excerpt from Seattle PI Eventually, Boeing could be building the 777 at record rates. Boe
28 Post contains links and images Revelation : Indeed. In fact, the only way the overall production rate can increase is to do so. It's just not the answer I imagine the poster was after! If I did
29 777MechSys : No talk... 777 will be on a 3 day rate by the end of the year.
30 NYC777 : So are you saying they'll be putting out 1 777 every three days? Is that what it means? If so, that's pretty damned good!!!
31 Beech19 : Good to hear. Then my "informant" was only half wrong. LOL Whats crazy to think is pushing out both 777's and 787's at 3 days a peice! Thats a lot of
32 WestWing : Just a quick request for clarification. According to earlier posts, Everett operates 24/7 and 777MechSys says they will achieve a 3-day rate for 777s
33 Post contains images Lightsaber : But if you've read any history about mass production, you realize that unless you push the limit, the company is throwing away productivity. If Boein
34 DZ09 : what's that green stuff you see on airplanes during assembly. Is that an aluminum primer or some sort of protective plastic film?
35 Post contains images Beech19 : Yes, every 3 days (on average, weekend work isn't as quick) a 777 would leave the factory, dragged across Highway 526 and into one of the paint shops
36 NYC777 : Wow then we're talking about 10 777/month. Have the suppliers already been turning out their pieces to support this rate? Seems like quite a bit.
37 Post contains images Beech19 : Plastic film. When you pull it all off and polish it up you get a AA aircraft.
38 KELPkid : Yeppers, that would be primer...
39 Post contains links AirbusCanada : here is an article comparing production process at airbus and boeing. http://courses.washington.edu/samcrs/Howtheotherhalfbuilds.pdf
40 Post contains links Beech19 : No... The green is not a primer as i already mentioned. It is a plastic-based coating (film was the wrong word) that is on the metal peices that are
41 Post contains links and images Beech19 : This is the plastic protective coating... View Large View MediumPhoto © Nick Goodwin This is primer... View Large View MediumPhoto © Nick Go
42 KELPkid : Ah, thanks for the correction. I never knew about the plastic before...and primer is quite green (just a lot more yellowish green than the plastic!).
43 Beech19 : Yeah... the plastic is cool to see. Definitly not your average white plane jane airliner. (plastic green is how the BBJ's are delivered to the custom
44 Toiletboy99999 : Sorry, all of this was in a convo. i had with a Boeing Project Engr.
45 Post contains images Astuteman : Me too Me too It does ask a lot of the design community, though. I genuinely hope that you meant "defer". I'd hate to "differ" with you on this subje
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