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Why So Long To Clear Us To The Assigned Altitude?  
User currently offlineGolftango From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 314 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5206 times:

Yesterday from KPHL to KBDL on WN, we went up to a FL less than 10K (I'm assuming because our landing lights were still on) and continued at this altitude for quite some time. We just skimmed along the low cloud layer. I actually thought we were going to continue on to KBDL like this. Then after 15 minutes or so we pulled up pretty hard and climbed on up to our assigned FL, then right back down on into KBDL. Is this the norm because I've never experienced this before? Maybe ATC related?



11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFuturecaptain From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5207 times:

There are times on departure where you will be cleared to an intermediate altitude for a few minutes before being allowed to climb to cruise. Several possible reasons including conflicting traffic higher up and in case you have radio failure you will figure it out at a lower altitude and can handle it there instead of being at 30K feet.

User currently offlineJdwfloyd From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 837 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5211 times:

Between PHL and BDL is some pretty congested airspace. Perhaps the air traffic controller that you were talking to only had control to a certain altitude. Or traffic above you had to clear before you were issued a climb. There a many factors that play into altitude restrictions and clearances.

User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 5207 times:

Landing lights are on below FL180 now (used to be 10,000), so you probably were higher than ten. In addition to the usual ATC variables, it could also have benn turbulence at higher altitudes. I was working the west coast yesterday, so I can't tell you for sure since I didn't have any flights in the area....

User currently offlineGolftango From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 314 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 5207 times:

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 3):
Landing lights are on below FL180 now (used to be 10,000)

Oh wow, is this something new? Thanks for the info everyone, most likely traffic in the Tri-State area!


User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6385 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 5207 times:

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 3):
Landing lights are on below FL180 now (used to be 10,000), so you probably were higher than ten. In addition to the usual ATC variables, it could also have benn turbulence at higher altitudes. I was working the west coast yesterday, so I can't tell you for sure since I didn't have any flights in the area....

Do you guys ever utilize tower-to-tower IFR in areas of the USA like these, or is that just limited to us GA folk  Wink Tower-to-tower IFR is where the entire flight is handled by adjoining control towers and/or tracon facilities exclsuively (i.e. center is never contacted). I guess if your plan is to go above FL180, then that's automatically out of the question  Smile



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 4747 times:

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 5):
Do you guys ever utilize tower-to-tower IFR in areas of the USA like these, or is that just limited to us GA folk

Sometimes we use tower enroute, but things have to be mucho screwed up...


User currently offlineBAW2198 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 637 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 4731 times:

Give this website a look--> http://flightaware.com/live/flight/SWA2023

I don't know your flight number, but if this was your flight, you went right through NY's airspace. That would account as futurecaptain said for the delay in climb.



"And remember, Keep your stick on the ice"--->Red Green
User currently offlineFlyibaby From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1017 posts, RR: 6
Reply 8, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 4711 times:

Quoting BAW2198 (Reply 7):
Give this website a look--> http://flightaware.com/live/flight/SWA2023

I don't know your flight number, but if this was your flight, you went right through NY's airspace. That would account as futurecaptain said for the delay in climb.

This is absolutely correct. As an example, if you are traveling IAD-JFK, your assigned altitude will usually be FL170 because they are stacking the flights in every 1000 feet due to RVSM. I would be suprised if you ever climbed above FL170 on that route anyway.


User currently offlinePHLapproach From Philippines, joined Mar 2004, 1243 posts, RR: 19
Reply 9, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 4704 times:

Out to PHL you would have been climbed to 12k and turned to DITCH. Then switched to the DIXIE68 low sector within ZNY and if you had a higher filed altitude he would have sent you up to 240. Granted, sometimes it can take time before DIXIE68 can get you a climb out of Philly. Obviously since you can see that flight is too short, then ZNY would have been able to keep you with the low sectors but still clear the New York TRACON at 17000. It's easier for the low sectors to keep you rather than send you up and have the High sectors such as JFK56 deal with trying to sequence you in with Boston and Canadian bound traffic.

User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6385 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 4660 times:

Quoting Flyibaby (Reply 8):
your assigned altitude will usually be FL170

In the US, the flight levels don't begin until 18,000 feet...they may tell you to "climb and maintain 17,000 feet", but the Flight Level would imply setting the altimeter to the common datum (29.92 inches of mercury) which is only done at 18,000 feet in the US. At 17,000 feet, you would use the last altimeter setting given by ATC, or the altimeter setting received in the ATIS for the destination field.



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineGolftango From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 314 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 4514 times:

This was my actual flight, but i appreicate all the insight

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/S...9/history/20061115/2141Z/KPHL/KBDL

Here is the log:
04:41PM 39.87 -75.28 147 1200
04:42PM 39.83 -75.38 323 4500
04:42PM 39.83 -75.37 207 5800
04:43PM 39.80 -75.45 279 8600
04:43PM 39.80 -75.43 207 9900
04:44PM 39.75 -75.42 261 10900
04:44PM 39.75 -75.40 257 12000
04:44PM 39.75 -75.42 261 10900
04:45PM 39.75 -75.30 326 19000
04:45PM 39.75 -75.28 321 12000
04:46PM 39.75 -75.18 328 19000
04:46PM 39.77 -75.15 325 12000
04:47PM 39.77 -75.07 382 19000
04:47PM 39.77 -75.05 384 12000
04:48PM 39.78 -74.92 404 19000
04:49PM 39.78 -74.77 411 12200
04:50PM 39.85 -74.63 384 16000
04:51PM 39.95 -74.57 386 19000
04:52PM 40.03 -74.47 400 21000
04:53PM 40.15 -74.37 432 21000


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