Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Big Changes In Aviation Due To Aircraft Accidents?  
User currently offlineJAM747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 550 posts, RR: 1
Posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 7346 times:

What are some of the the big changes to aviation that has happened due aircraft accidents? During the history of aviation there have been some very terrible accidents and air disaster resulting in loss of life. Unfortuately it was not untill these accidents occured that certain steps were put in to prevent such tragedies from happening or reduce the loss of life if they do happen. What are some of these changes that were put in place that have improved aviation safety?

55 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 7339 times:

A major accident that made a lot of safety improvments possible was the Delta 191 accident at DFW back in 1985. The aircraft involved, a L-1011 had a digital flight data recorder (DFDR) and it recorded many more data parameters than was the norm compared with many other aircraft flying back then that recorded fewer. That increased level of captured data helped with:

1. Dr. Ted Fujita's research on microburst windshear.

2. Refinements in flight simulator programming so that all crews could fly 191's encounter themselves.

3. The development of Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR).

4. The development of predictive and reactive windshear programming for use on the aircraft.


User currently offlineLazyshaun From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 548 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 7320 times:

How about the Concorde crash in France? Largely contributing factor to its retirement by both AF and BA.

AS MD80 that crashed due to the back tailwings (sorry, don't know their name) braking and it crashing into the sea (?) from full height? Lead to an investigation concluding that the part responsible for the manueovering of it not being properly greased by AS (and apparently other carriers)
BTW, I only saw this on a programme a little while ago, so that is why I can't remember too much. Plus it was on C5...


Also, not major for aviation, but recently some crashes in Africa, especially Nigeria, have resulted in the Airlines' licence for flying being taken away by the govt.

There are plenty more, and I'm sure people will fill in Smile



I came. I saw. I conquered
User currently offlineVref5 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7292 times:

Development of the Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS), which finally became a reality due to crashes in 1970-1971 including the loss of the aircraft carrying a large number of Marshall University football team members. (The movie about its aftermath in football, titled 'We are Marshall' is coming out in three weeks.)

The NTSB report concerning the 1970 Marshall crash, released in 1972:

http://www.marshall.edu/library/spec...m/Memorial/pdfs/NTSB-AAR-72-11.pdf

See printed page 68 of the PDF document file (or PDF document page 75) for that recommendation. GPWS hasn't been foolproof, but it's helped with aviation safety.


User currently offlineMPDPilot From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 991 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7281 times:

The 737 had a problem with its rudder for a while where it would go to a full deflection in certian curcumstances resulting in two aircraft crashing. this resulted in a new part on the 737 to fix the problem and also I think it contributed to newer aircraft having more than one yaw control surfaces.

there is also that saying "FARs are writen in blood"



One mile of highway gets you one mile, one mile of runway gets you anywhere.
User currently offlineFlyboy_se From Sweden, joined Feb 2000, 812 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7275 times:

Since Pan Am crash over Lockerbie, everybody have to travel with their checked in luggage.If you dont show up at the gate they have to offload your luggage.


I prefer to be crazy and happy rather than normal and bitter
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3519 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7266 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

One of the big ones was the Knute Rockne Fokker accident that resulted in the abandonment of wood as an airliner structural material.


Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
User currently offlineVref5 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7262 times:

Research and development of the 'artificial horizon' (attitude indicator) and the 'heading indicator' (directional gyro) by General Jimmy Doolittle. This technology allowed him to demonstrate instrument-based flying.

For one thing, you had a longer lifespan if you ended up in instrument flying weather, with the improved cockpit technology and navigational aids. That was a particular issue that bedeviled early aviation.

Even to this day, some private pilots still continues to reap the benefits of instruments-based flying. Sometimes as a means to get somewhere without being confined to great weather, and sometimes as a means to get out of a situation gone really bad in a hurry.

In commercial aviation, it essentially means that a qualified flight crew, runway, and aircraft can land in extremely poor weather without undue concern about survivability when coupled with expertise and other assistive tools.


User currently offlineVref5 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7259 times:

Crew Resource Management (CRM) developed out of a NASA safety seminar in 1979 as a means to provide more effective crew interaction and using all possible resources to avoid accidents.

User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 9, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7254 times:

Every single major accident over the last 30 or so years dictated changes in the way commercial aviation flies. Just off the top of my head...

Valujet 592- mandated fire detection and supression in all cargo holds. It also drove changes in how airlines with work with Part 145 Repair Stations.

United 232- Major changes in cockpit crew resources training and use.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 10, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7243 times:

Air Canada DC-9 in CVG, brought about changes in aisle path lighting in dense smoke onboard.


You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineVref5 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7242 times:

Quoting MPDPilot (Reply 4):
The 737 had a problem with its rudder for a while where it would go to a full deflection in certian curcumstances resulting in two aircraft crashing. this resulted in a new part on the 737 to fix the problem and also I think it contributed to newer aircraft having more than one yaw control surfaces.

there is also that saying "FARs are writen in blood"

Indeed (re: the quote).

The crashes of the '70s and '80s exposed the dangers of having single points of failure in aircraft systems. E.g. American Airlines 191 crash at O'Hare in 1979, United Airlines 232 Sioux City crash in 1989.

These accidents and others led to revamped aircraft design which made it much more fault tolerant in all but the most extreme circumstances.


User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1984 posts, RR: 6
Reply 12, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7216 times:

WOW, i am surprised no one has mentioned 11/Sept/01... the only thing really changed on aircraft would be to strengthen the cockpit doors, but procedure has changed drastically. No longer can people go up and see the cockpit in flight, people can not gather in big groups, no one allowed into front galley when pilot has to go to the washroom etc, i think this would have been the most influental "accident" in history.


Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 13, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7206 times:

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 12):
No longer can people go up and see the cockpit in flight,

At least in the US, that wasn't a change. But you are right, that that wasn't brought up earlier.



You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7206 times:

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 12):
WOW, i am surprised no one has mentioned 11/Sept/01

Maybe it's just me, but I didn't consider those since they were intentional acts, and not accidents per se in the context that the OP seemed to be looking for...


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3519 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 7195 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 12):
WOW, i am surprised no one has mentioned 11/Sept/01

No one has mentioned it because it wasn't an accident....



Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 16, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 7195 times:

How about the airstair device that prohibits lowering of the aft airstairs on 727-200s. Wasn't that brought about by the D.B. Cooper/NWA flight?


You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineVref5 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 7175 times:

A redesign of the door locking mechanism and improved pressurization controls + systems to prevent uncontained/explosive decompression resulting in loss of control. A significant one that comes to mind was Turkish Airlines 981 that crashed in a snow-covered forest in France in '74.

There were a rash of that type of accident in the mid '70s and a few more after then, but has since mostly dropped off.


User currently offlineCjbmibe From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2006, 108 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 7157 times:

BD092 LHR-BHD crashed in 1989 a few yards from EMA.

As a result of this crash:
greater communication between the cockpit and cabin crew developed;
longer training for variations of aircraft -this was a 734 and only new with the airline, and contained some new features over previous versions, crew only received 75 hours of flights onboard in total;
a common brace position was adapted by British airlines;
research into backward facing seats was also carried out and discovered that its safer.



How can I soar like an Eagle when I have to work with these turkeys?
User currently offlineZippyjet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 5478 posts, RR: 12
Reply 19, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 7148 times:

Way back in the Jurassic era before many of my fellow A-Netters were even a glimmer in their parent's eye, there was Lockheed's L-188 Electra. Sadly this plane that was at first popular suffered several fatal crashes. New speed restrictions were put into place until Lockheed made a design fix. Excessive vibration in the engine nacelles caused the plane to break apart. Once that fix was made, the speed restrictions were lifted and the L-188 proved to be a solid reliable turboprop. However, by then the pure jet age was in full swing and you know the rest!


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Barry A. Stark
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mel Lawrence



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mel Lawrence
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mel Lawrence




I'm Zippyjet & I approve of this message!
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 20, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 7136 times:

Also, the British Airtours 737 incident in MAN, August 22, 1985, didn't that bring about changes in seating around the window exits (as in allowing for more room so people can get out) and standardising evacuation procedures, as well?


You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineMCOflyer From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 8671 posts, RR: 15
Reply 21, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 7134 times:

What about the 737 rudder problems, UA 292, and the UA 741 crash over the pacific from HNL enroute to AKL?

If i'm right, all forward cargo doors had to have diffrent mechanisms to the forward corgo door on 747's.

I believe UA292 brought procedures on how to deal with situations that include hydraulics.

MCOflyer



Never be afraid to stand up for who you are.
User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1984 posts, RR: 6
Reply 22, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 7114 times:

Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 13):
At least in the US, that wasn't a change. But you are right, that that wasn't brought up earlier.

Ahh, i did not know this, as i always have traveled AC when possible, i was always given a chance to get up front.

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 15):
No one has mentioned it because it wasn't an accident....

While it was not an accident in the context that there was a maintenance malfunction, pilot error etc... it involved an airplane, well four, that crashed into a building, which a substantial amount of lifes where lost, following this day, new security messures where brought into place, because of this i think it is a valid situation to put in here.



Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlineMCOflyer From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 8671 posts, RR: 15
Reply 23, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 7066 times:

I think the Gimeli Glider accident mandated certain use of metric system.

MCOflyer



Never be afraid to stand up for who you are.
User currently offlineReidYYZ From Kyrgyzstan, joined Sep 2005, 536 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 7049 times:

If memory serves:

EA401 into the everglades brought about changes to autopilot disconnect protocols: More pressure on control column required and a louder and more distinct audible tone/chime and maybe something to do with radio altimeter (don't know enough about rad-alt history, I could be wrong)

NG004 (Lauda Air) with inflight T/Rev deployment brought about requirments to include a tertiary locking system in most, if not all T/Rev systems.

Aloha Airlines 243: aging aircraft procedures implemented after this or before-not sure.

United 232 (Sioux City) caused the implementation of hydraulic fuses in critical areas. Trivia:Lockheed foresaw this very problem in designing the Tristar. In case of #1 engine turbine disc failure, there was a fuse installed in the fuselage left of where the lower galley is for, I think, 'A' system for nose gear retraction or slat ops.


25 EWRCabincrew : Gimli glider, but yes...at least use one or the other.
26 Bohica : IIRC in the AA DC-10 accident in ORD, the F/O was flying the A/C. Stick shakers/pushers were optional on the F/O's side on the DC-10. AA did not selec
27 Pilot3033 : IIRC, it was flight 1771 Flight 182 (also IIRC) was responsible for further developments and implementation of TCAS.
28 TrijetsRMissed : Just to add to whats already been said.. AA587 A300 in Queens, changed training procedures on how pilots should use the rudder. AA191 DC10 in Chicago
29 MCOflyer : Didn't that AA accident in Columbia bring some required practices? Also if I remember correctly that EA 721 crash at JFK made INS mandatory standard o
30 TrijetsRMissed : While each accident started with a single failure, they both lead to a series of failures. Also AA191 changed maintenance procedures. Engines and pyl
31 OPNLguy : Takeoff configuration warning systems were on aircraft long before these two... If that's Eastern 66 at JFK (a microburst encounter), INS wasn't made
32 TrijetsRMissed : You're right, but the CAWS was modified afterwards. Most notably the system's fail light to ensure the CAWS is functioning properly with adequate ele
33 Post contains links MarkHKG : It even helped push for a new overwing exit design for the B737-NG series aircraft, the "self disposing" hatches. In progress is the whole fuel vapor
34 TrijetsRMissed : " target=_blank>http://www.ntsb.gov/Recs/mostwanted/...s.htm These changes are only being integrated into new aircraft being built, so theoretically a
35 MarkHKG : Correct. And it's not just the 747. After TWA800, a parked Thai Airways Intl 737-400 exploded in 2001, killing 1 person. It was blamed, again, on the
36 Jimbobjoe : The door locking mechanism problem was known at the time of the accident. In fact, the aircraft had been ordered after Mcdonnell-Douglas had issued a
37 TrijetsRMissed : There was an AA DC-10 that had the same door blow open in flight. This happened two years before the Turkish accident. It landed safely, which probab
38 Jasond : That was the big one for me. It radically changed the culture in the cockpit to a more collaberative environment for info sharing and decision making
39 TrijetsRMissed : Not too mention you have history's worst Captain in Van Zandt vs what I consider the best, the hero Capt AL Haynes.
40 Breiz : I assume that one of the most significant change followed the Comet crashes which led to better knowledge of metal fatigue due to varying pressure an
41 Vref5 : Very good points taken regarding AA 191. Speaking of aircraft design... the recent Helios B737 crash in Greece might suggest design changes to visual
42 Vref5 : I can't quite point to any one particular accident in the past without looking it up but standardization of ATC phrasing and terminology as well as ra
43 Post contains links Vref5 : The SAS 686 and Cessna Citation accident at Milano Linate airport several years ago led to renewed calls for better ground movement monitoring tools,
44 LHStarAlliance : What about , SR111 in Peggys Cove . ?
45 PSU.DTW.SCE : NW 1482 in DTW 12/3/1990 - the DC-9-10 that wandered onto the active runway in dense fog and was sliced up and caught fire due to the wing of a NW 727
46 GBan : I'd add the "Hindenburg" to such a list - at that time the accident in Lakehurst did change aviation.
47 LTBEWR : Good point. The most important change from SR111 was the revisions of wiring coatings and insualtion. If I am correct, the insuation on this MD-11, a
48 Trekster : The one i was going to talk about One of the biggest changes came about due to this incident.
49 MarkHKG : Also caused the introduction of "vent holes" between compartments, to prevent a huge pressure differential from causing structural failure or collaps
50 TrijetsRMissed : In 1991 a USAir 733 flight 1493 was cleared to land on a runway at LAX in which a Skywest Metroliner was awaiting take-off clearance. The aircraft co
51 Post contains images OPNLguy : And, leading that all off was their flight 5050 in September 1989, which aborted a takeoff on 31 at LGA and ended up off the end of the pier in the a
52 PSU.DTW.SCE : Of those 5 USAir incidents, where there any big procedural changes or safety improvements as result?
53 Post contains links Zippyjet : One of the all time classic changes came about what was then one of the worst airliner disasters. June 1956 when a UA DC-7 and a TWA Connie slammed in
54 TrijetsRMissed : The most notable accident that caused changes and safety improvements was US427. It took the NTSB a few years but they were able to determine that th
55 Post contains images KELPkid : In general (and this is a big generalization ), the years of analyzing cockpit voice recorders after accidents, followed by the reviewing of psycholog
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Big Changes In South Florida Aviation posted Thu Sep 18 2003 01:56:15 by Acvitale
Rnwys 31L/R In Use Due To High Winds At DFW posted Wed Nov 15 2006 23:21:47 by N659AA
Compensation Due To Aircraft Crashes posted Thu Sep 22 2005 19:40:17 by Vio
BIG Changes In DFW For Delta Again... posted Wed Sep 21 2005 07:26:30 by N839MH
Asiana To Reduce Some Flights In Aug Due To Strike posted Sat Jul 30 2005 03:25:02 by HeeseokKoo
Adjustments In Loads Due To Extreme Heat posted Wed Jul 20 2005 13:47:00 by LTBEWR
CHS Closed Due To Aircraft Accident posted Tue Jan 11 2005 01:46:34 by Hannigan
Big Day In Aviation History posted Fri Dec 17 2004 13:51:41 by Xpat
Runway 9 Closed In BOS Due To Birdstrike posted Thu Oct 21 2004 20:53:30 by Iowaman
Ground Stop In MSP Due To "vip Movement" posted Fri Jul 16 2004 22:53:41 by Ezycrew