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Emergency Exit Seat Policies  
User currently offlineAg92 From India, joined Jul 2006, 1317 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3918 times:

What are the policies of the various airlines out there.

Like I know with UA, the person has to be 15 before he/she is eligible for the exit seats.

A quick search revealed nothing, so sorry if it has been posted before
and
sorry if this is posted in the wrong forum, I thought that this might be best suited in this forum.

Regards

24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineHBJZA From Switzerland, joined Jan 2006, 376 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3906 times:

At U2 one must be ABP (able bodied passenger), at least 16 yo, not pregnant, not under the influence of drugs, alcohol or whatever and so on. So Pax must be perfect to sit there.

User currently offlineDaleaholic From UK - England, joined Oct 2005, 3204 posts, RR: 13
Reply 2, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3883 times:

Quoting HBJZA (Reply 1):
ABP (able bodied passenger)

I think this is pretty much standard for any exit row seat. The age seems to vary, I have seen minimum ages of 15/16. Ability to lift about 60lb I think was one on Delta.  Smile



Religion is an illusion of childhood... Outgrown under proper education.
User currently offlineWexCan From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2006, 100 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 3847 times:

Quoting HBJZA (Reply 1):
At U2 one must be ABP (able bodied passenger), at least 16 yo, not pregnant, not under the influence of drugs, alcohol or whatever and so on. So Pax must be perfect to sit there.

Is that for EZY or EZS? At EZY we allow anyone over 14. Then again, maybe I read my manual wrong  Smile


User currently offlineBongodog1964 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 3475 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 3827 times:

I noticed when travelling with VS, you have to be abled bodied, and willing to pay a £50 surcharge.

The result was that an attendant had to ask two able bodoed people to move to the exit row for takeoff and landing in order to meet regulations.


User currently offlineUN_B732 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 4289 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 3791 times:

Delta is 14 or over, you can pre-reserve as an elite domestically (or as a non-elite on Dash 8s, and possibly CRJs)
Internationally they are blocked for the airport.
-A



What now?
User currently offlineBa767s From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3769 times:

Quoting WexCan (Reply 3):
Quoting HBJZA (Reply 1):
At U2 one must be ABP (able bodied passenger), at least 16 yo, not pregnant, not under the influence of drugs, alcohol or whatever and so on. So Pax must be perfect to sit there.

Is that for EZY or EZS? At EZY we allow anyone over 14. Then again, maybe I read my manual wrong

Yes Chris you are right, just check out your cabin safety card CHIPPED section. ABP must be 14+.

Happy Landings,

J.K


User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 7, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3767 times:

All U.S. airlines the minimums are (to name a few):

-Be at least 15 years of age or older
-Have full mobility to assist with getting exit open without injury to you or others
-Have the ability to understand and communicate instructions
-Be physically able and willing to operate the emergency equipment if necessary.
-Not being hearing impaired as to not hear commands of the crew
-Not be visually impaired as to not see potential problems
-Able to direct/redirect others
-Not be responsible for others (i.e. a child/infant)

Hopefully crews do their jobs and assess who is sitting there for potential issues (although I am sure readers here have a few stories of their own concerning this).

These minimums have no bearing on frequent flying status or when/where you checked in with your airline. The FAA doesn't give a toss about your frequent flyer status.

[Edited 2006-12-02 17:38:03]

[Edited 2006-12-02 17:38:31]


You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineAA777223 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1219 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3765 times:

AA, have to be 15, able- bodied, and elite.


Sic 'em bears
User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2127 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 3716 times:

Quoting AA777223 (Reply 8):
AA, have to be 15, able- bodied, and elite.

Elite? In what sense? You don't mean ff status do you, because:

Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 7):
These minimums have no bearing on frequent flying status or when/where you checked in with your airline. The FAA doesn't give a toss about your frequent flyer status.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineAA777223 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1219 posts, RR: 7
Reply 10, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 3701 times:

Yes, I am. To pre-reserve an exit row seat on AA, the AIRLINE says that frequent flier elites get first pick. Sure the FAA doesn't care, but its the airline that makes the ultimate choice. I am gold on AA, and am fortunate to get to fly in these seats, but I can assure, before I qualified, it is only non-exit seats, unless there are no elites on the flight, who are able, and desire those them.


Sic 'em bears
User currently offlineWexCan From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2006, 100 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 3695 times:

Quoting Ba767s (Reply 6):
Yes Chris you are right, just check out your cabin safety card CHIPPED section. ABP must be 14+.

Ah good old CHIPPED. Got me into trouble one day when I tried to explain it to a quite, eh, large passenger. Being the perfect newbie I recited it word for word and he came back with "it doesn't say anything about fat now does it?".


User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 12, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 3681 times:

Quoting AA777223 (Reply 10):
Yes, I am. To pre-reserve an exit row seat on AA, the AIRLINE says that frequent flier elites get first pick. Sure the FAA doesn't care, but its the airline that makes the ultimate choice. I am gold on AA, and am fortunate to get to fly in these seats, but I can assure, before I qualified, it is only non-exit seats, unless there are no elites on the flight, who are able, and desire those them.

The topic was what are the policies (re: requirements) to sit there. Being AA gold is not a requirement, although AA thanks you in advance for your patronage.

You are right in that the airline can make that choice who, based on what fare/standing with frequent flyer program/etc., sits there. But ultimately is is based on the requirements doled out by the FAA.

You could be gold with AA, platinum with CO and DL and not meet the requirements the FAA gives out. Then, you do not sit there, no matter how many miles you flew or how many dollars you spend.

Bottom line is the policies are governed by the FAA and then the individual airline to pass it on.



You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineTurkishWings From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1436 posts, RR: 8
Reply 13, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3609 times:

I do not know the exact age requirement but at TK we normally do not allow under 18 or so... Additionally, old (I mean very old), disabled, pregnant women and those with children can not sit at the exit row as well.... Also no luggage, even a small handbag is allowed at these rows...

This week, I had 2 flights with TK.. A 734 and a 738... Normally TK 737's have 3+3 seating on all rows but this particular A/C (the 734), which I think was leased from Asiana, had 2 + 2 seating at the emergency exit with a very large gap between the seat and the window... Both rows were empty.. Don't you think someone should be sitting there? Who is supposed to open the windows in an unprepared emergency situation?



Coffee - Tea or Me?
User currently offlineFutureFO From Ireland, joined Oct 2001, 3132 posts, RR: 22
Reply 14, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3601 times:

EWRCabinCrew is correct in the requirements to sit in the Exit row. FF status only matters in selecting the exit in an online checkin. It releases first online to the high FF pax. At the airport however if they are still there then anyone that meets the minimum criteria can select those seats.


I Don't know where I am anymore
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 15, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3601 times:

Quoting TurkishWings (Reply 13):
Don't you think someone should be sitting there? Who is supposed to open the windows in an unprepared emergency situation?

What if the flight were empty or had very few people on board?

At CO, all doors are manned and have cabin crew at them per FAA guidelines and how the FAA certified CO to operate their aircraft. Window exits are classified as secondary exits. Most people will go to the door in which they entered. Not a window exit.

For cabin crew, we have primary exits to cover and some of us have secondary, like the window exits.



You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineNzrich From New Zealand, joined Dec 2005, 1515 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3591 times:

At Air NZ
Min age is 15 must be able to open the exit
Be able bodied
Be able to understand the crew instructions (ie speak english)
Not require a extension seatbelt ie no infants as well
Be prepared to help in a emergency



"Pride of the pacific"
User currently offlineAA777223 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1219 posts, RR: 7
Reply 17, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3572 times:

Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 12):
Bottom line is the policies are governed by the FAA and then the individual airline to pass it on.

I am aware of the topics original direction. However, as it seemed to evolve into the policies of many different carriers, I thought I would share my knowledge of one which hadn't been mentioned yet. I didn't realize we weren't allowed to share information beyond the most strict confines of the original question.



Sic 'em bears
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 18, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3558 times:

Quoting AA777223 (Reply 17):
I didn't realize we weren't allowed to share information beyond the most strict confines of the original question.

What I had posted was in no means to take away from what you were inputting to the post. If you took it the wrong way, it was a complete misunderstanding on what my posts were.

We are all free to post what additional info we want, but I was trying to convey what the FAA minimums were. Some people aren't sure what they are. You, on the other hand, offered just as valuable information as to what airlines do. Great addition.

When I said bottom line, it wasn't a slam against you at all, sometimes I ramble and I wanted the reader to know my final point, it was meant to convey what the base minimums were, per the FAA, not what you could/couldn't add to the conversation.

If you felt slighted, I apologise. It wasn't meant to be personal, by any stretch.

Cheers,

Bill



You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineWe're Nuts From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 5722 posts, RR: 20
Reply 19, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3554 times:

Quoting AA777223 (Reply 17):
However, as it seemed to evolve into the policies of many different carriers, I thought I would share my knowledge of one which hadn't been mentioned yet

You didn't mention a "policy", you mentioned a "perk". If an elite passenger has a broken leg, his is not sitting in the exit row, and the airline will switch him with any other other able bodied passenger, status be damned.



Dear moderators: No.
User currently offlineAA777223 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1219 posts, RR: 7
Reply 20, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3520 times:

quotation error, suggest deletion

[Edited 2006-12-03 01:49:16]


Sic 'em bears
User currently offlineAA777223 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1219 posts, RR: 7
Reply 21, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3512 times:

Quoting AA777223 (Reply 8):
AA, have to be 15, able- bodied, and elite.

I think you will find "and" was the word in the original post.

Quoting We're Nuts (Reply 19):
If an elite passenger has a broken leg, his is not sitting in the exit row, and the airline will switch him with any other other able bodied passenger, status be damned.

That is unlikely the case. I think you will find a disabled elite passenger replaced by another able-bodied, elite passenger. It is unlikely they will choose just "any other passenger".



Sic 'em bears
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3501 times:

For those of us in the US, everything you could ever want want to know (maybe) about the requirements:

Sec. 121.585 - Exit seating.

(a)(1) Each certificate holder shall determine, to the extent necessary to perform the applicable functions of paragraph (d) of this section, the suitability of each person it permits to occupy an exit seat, in accordance with this section. For the purpose of this section --

(i) Exit seat means --

(A) Each seat having direct access to an exit; and,

(B) Each seat in a row of seats through which passengers would have to pass to gain access to an exit, from the first seat inboard of the exit to the first aisle inboard of the exit.

(ii) A passenger seat having "direct access" means a seat from which a passenger can proceed directly to the exit without entering an aisle or passing around an obstruction.

(2) Each certificate holder shall make the passenger exit seating determinations required by this paragraph in a non-discriminatory manner consistent with the requirements of this section, by persons designated in the certificate holder's required operations manual.

(3) Each certificate holder shall designate the exit seats for each passenger seating configuration in its fleet in accordance with the definitions in this paragraph and submit those designations for approval as part of the procedures required to be submitted for approval under paragraphs (n) and (p) of this section.

(b) No certificate holder may seat a person in a seat affected by this section if the certificate holder determines that it is likely that the person would be unable to perform one or more of the applicable functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section because --

(1) The person lacks sufficient mobility, strength, or dexterity in both arms and hands, and both legs:

(i) To reach upward, sideways, and downward to the location of emergency exit and exit-slide operating mechanisms;

(ii) To grasp and push, pull, turn, or otherwise manipulate those mechanisms;

(iii) To push, shove, pull, or otherwise open emergency exits;

(iv) To lift out, hold, deposit on nearby seats, or maneuver over the seatbacks to the next row objects the size and weight of over-wing window exit doors;

(v) To remove obstructions similar in size and weight to over-wing exit doors;

(vi) To reach the emergency exit expeditiously;

(vii) To maintain balance while removing obstructions;

(viii) To exit expeditiously;

(ix) To stabilize an escape slide after deployment; or

(x) To assist others in getting off an escape slide;

(2) The person is less than 15 years of age or lacks the capacity to perform one or more of the applicable functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section without the assistance of an adult companion, parent, or other relative;

(3) The person lacks the ability to read and understand instructions required by this section and related to emergency evacuation provided by the certificate holder in printed or graphic form or the ability to understand oral crew commands.

(4) The person lacks sufficient visual capacity to perform one or more of the applicable functions in paragraph (d) of this section without the assistance of visual aids beyond contact lenses or eyeglasses;

(5) The person lacks sufficient aural capacity to hear and understand instructions shouted by flight attendants, without assistance beyond a hearing aid;

(6) The person lacks the ability adequately to impart information orally to other passengers; or,

(7) The person has:

(i) A condition or responsibilities, such as caring for small children, that might prevent the person from performing one or more of the applicable functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section; or

(ii) A condition that might cause the person harm if he or she performs one or more of the applicable functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section.

(c) Each passenger shall comply with instructions given by a crewmember or other authorized employee of the certificate holder implementing exit seating restrictions established in accordance with this section.

(d) Each certificate holder shall include on passenger information cards, presented in the language in which briefings and oral commands are given by the crew, at each exit seat affected by this section, information that, in the event of an emergency in which a crewmember is not available to assist, a passenger occupying an exit seat may use if called upon to perform the following functions:

(1) Locate the emergency exit;

(2) Recognize the emergency exit opening mechanism;

(3) Comprehend the instructions for operating the emergency exit;

(4) Operate the emergency exit;

(5) Assess whether opening the emergency exit will increase the hazards to which passengers may be exposed;

(6) Follow oral directions and hand signals given by a crewmember;

(7) Stow or secure the emergency exit door so that it will not impede use of the exit;

(8) Assess the condition of an escape slide, activate the slide, and stabilize the slide after deployment to assist others in getting off the slide;

(9) Pass expeditiously through the emergency exit; and

(10) Assess, select, and follow a safe path away from the emergency exit.

(e) Each certificate holder shall include on passenger information cards, at each exit seat --

(1) In the primary language in which emergency commands are given by the crew, the selection criteria set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, and a request that a passenger identify himself or herself to allow reseating if he or she:

(i) Cannot meet the selection criteria set forth in paragraph (b) of this section;

(ii) Has a nondiscernible condition that will prevent him or her from performing the applicable functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section;

(iii) May suffer bodily harm as the result of performing one or more of those functions; or

(iv) Does not wish to perform those functions; and

(2) In each language used by the certificate holder for passenger information cards, a request that a passenger identify himself or herself to allow reseating if he or she lacks the ability to read, speak, or understand the language or the graphic form in which instructions required by this section and related to emergency evacuation are provided by the certificate holder, or the ability to understand the specified language in which crew commands will be given in an emergency.

(3) May suffer bodily harm as the result of performing one or more of those functions; or,

(4) Does not wish to perform those functions.

A certificate holder shall not require the passenger to disclose his or her reason for needing reseating.

(f) Each certificate holder shall make available for inspection by the public at all passenger loading gates and ticket counters at each airport where it conducts passenger operations, written procedures established for making determinations in regard to exit row seating.

(g) No certificate holder may allow taxi or pushback unless at least one required crewmember has verified that no exit seat is occupied by a person the crewmember determines is likely to be unable to perform the applicable functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section.

(h) Each certificate holder shall include in its passenger briefings a reference to the passenger information cards, required by paragraphs (d) and (e), the selection criteria set forth in paragraph (b), and the functions to be performed, set forth in paragraph (d) of this section.

(i) Each certificate holder shall include in its passenger briefings a request that a passenger identify himself or herself to allow reseating if he or she --

(1) Cannot meet the selection criteria set forth in paragraph (b) of this section;

(2) Has a nondiscernible condition that will prevent him or her from performing the applicable functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section;

(3) May suffer bodily harm as the result of performing one or more of those functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section; or,

(4) Does not wish to perform those functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section.

A certificate holder shall not require the passenger to disclose his or her reason for needing reseating.

(j) [Reserved]

(k) In the event a certificate holder determines in accordance with this section that it is likely that a passenger assigned to an exit seat would be unable to perform the functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section or a passenger requests a non-exit seat, the certificate holder shall expeditiously relocate the passenger to a non-exit seat.

(l) In the event of full booking in the non-exit seats and if necessary to accommodate a passenger being relocated from an exit seat, the certificate holder shall move a passenger who is willing and able to assume the evacuation functions that may be required, to an exit seat.

(m) A certificate holder may deny transportation to any passenger under this section only because --

(1) The passenger refuses to comply with instructions given by a crewmember or other authorized employee of the certificate holder implementing exit seating restrictions established in accordance with this section, or

(2) The only seat that will physically accommodate the person's handicap is an exit seat.

(n) In order to comply with this section certificate holders shall --

(1) Establish procedures that address:

(i) The criteria listed in paragraph (b) of this section;

(ii) The functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section;

(iii) The requirements for airport information, passenger information cards, crewmember verification of appropriate seating in exit seats, passenger briefings, seat assignments, and denial of transportation as set forth in this section;

(iv) How to resolve disputes arising from implementation of this section, including identification of the certificate holder employee on the airport to whom complaints should be addressed for resolution; and,

(2) Submit their procedures for preliminary review and approval to the principal operations inspectors assigned to them at the certificate-holding district office.

(o) Certificate holders shall assign seats prior to boarding consistent with the criteria listed in paragraph (b) and the functions listed in paragraph (d) of this section, to the maximum extent feasible.

(p) The procedures required by paragraph (n) of this section will not become effective until final approval is granted by the Director, Flight Standards Service, Washington, DC. Approval will be based solely upon the safety aspects of the certificate holder's procedures.


User currently offlineFutureFO From Ireland, joined Oct 2001, 3132 posts, RR: 22
Reply 23, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 3489 times:

Therefore a bulkhead seat is not quite an exit seat unless on the Saab or the Do328.


I Don't know where I am anymore
User currently offlineWe're Nuts From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 5722 posts, RR: 20
Reply 24, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3394 times:

Quoting AA777223 (Reply 21):
That is unlikely the case. I think you will find a disabled elite passenger replaced by another able-bodied, elite passenger. It is unlikely they will choose just "any other passenger".

Flight attendants don't care about a passenger's "status" with the airline. That's a customer service job. All we care about is the ability of the person to open the exit and direct people to it.



Dear moderators: No.
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